Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Committee Membership Tresa M. Pollock (NAE), Chair, is the L.H. and F.E. Van Vlack Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She received a B.S. from Purdue University in 1984 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1989. Dr. Pol- lock was employed at General Electric Aircraft Engines from 1989 to 1991, where she conducted research and development on high-temperature alloys for aircraft turbine engines. She was a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University from 1991 to 1999. Her research inter- ests are in processing and properties of high-temperature structural materials, including nickel-base alloys, intermetallics, coatings, and composites. In 2007 Pro- fessor Pollock was president of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS), a 10,000-member global technical society for materials professionals, and has served as associate editor of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. She is a fellow of ASM International and has received the ASM International Research Silver Medal Award. Dr. Pollock was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2005. John E. Allison, Vice Chair, is a senior technical leader at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, in Dearborn, Michigan, where he currently leads teams focused on the science and technology required for low-cost, durable components fabricated from cast aluminum and magnesium alloys. Dr. Allison received his Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering and materials science in 1982 from Carnegie Mellon University, his M.S. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University in 1977, and his B.S. in engineering mechanics from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1972. The main focus of Dr. Allison’s work is the development 

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i n t e g r at e d c o m P u tat i o na l m at e r i a l s e n g i n e e r i n g 0 of a comprehensive suite of integrated computational materials engineering tools for modeling cast metal components with approaches ranging from casting pro- cess simulation to first-principle atomistic calculations. His research expertise is in processing−structure−property relationships, complex failure processes such as fatigue and creep in advanced metals and material selection processes. His past work included the development of titanium, intermetallics, and metal matrix composites for the automotive industry. Dr. Allison has been at Ford Research Laboratories since 1983. His work experience prior to that included service as an officer in the U.S. Air Force at the Wright Aeronautical Laboratories and as a visiting scientist at the Brown-Boveri Corporate Research Center in Baden, Switzerland. Dr. Allison is also an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan. He has over 120 publications and 4 patents. In 2002, Dr. Allison was the president of TMS. He is a fellow of ASM and has received numer- ous awards, including the Arch T. Colwell Award from SAE, Henry Ford Technology Award, Ford Technical Achievement Awards, Ford Innovation Awards, and the Air Force Systems Command Scientific Achievement Award. Dr. Allison has served as a member of NRC’s National Materials Advisory Board. Daniel G. Backman joined the Mechanical Engineering Department of Worcester Polytechnic Institute as a research professor following a 26-year career with GE Aircraft Engines. Dr. Backman received his S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He went on to hold an assistant professor- ship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and then joined GE, where he provided materials application engineering support and carried out research on aerospace materials and processes. More recently, he contributed to development of the disk alloy for the NASA high-speed civil transport and led the DARPA- sponsored Accelerated Insertion of Materials (AIM) initiative at GE. Much of Dr. Backman’s work has focused on mathematical modeling of material processes and the development and implementation of intelligent processing of materials methods for aircraft engine materials. At the time of his retirement from GE, Dr. Backman was the organizational leader of the Materials Modeling and Simulation section. He has served on a number of national technical committees, a corporate board, and has three patents on aerospace materials. Mary C. Boyce is the Gail E. Kendall Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Boyce earned a B.S. degree in engi- neering science and mechanics from Virginia Tech and an S.M. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the MIT faculty in 1987. Dr. Boyce teaches mechanics and materials. Her research focuses primarily on the mechanics of elastomers, polymers, and polymeric-based micro- and nanocomposite materials, with emphasis on identifying connections

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aPPendix a  among microstructure, deformation mechanisms, and mechanical properties. She has published over 100 technical journal papers in mechanics and materials. Profes- sor Boyce has received numerous awards and honors recognizing her research and teaching efforts, including the MIT MacVicar Faculty Fellow, the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, the ASME Applied Mechanics Young Investigator Award, fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics, fellow of the ASME, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Mark Gersh is currently senior manager of the Lockheed Martin Advanced Tech- nology Center’s Modeling, Simulation and Information Sciences Department, which is responsible for pursuing destabilizing information technologies critical to the success of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. These technolo- gies are applied in a diverse set of domains, including high-performance imag- ing and exploitation; mission-specific visualization and interaction; collaborative engineering and optimization; tracking, discrimination, and data fusion; network- embedded autonomy; distributed digital communications; and modeling and sim- ulation integration. Advancements are pursued in the context of remote sensing and space science, telecommunications and navigation, missile defense, space trans- portation, space exploration, and strategic systems. Previously, Mr. Gersh served as Lockheed Martin’s program manager for two key government efforts involved with the advancement of modeling and simulation technologies for rapid design and manufacturing. He led an effort with the Advanced Systems and Technology arm of the National Reconnaissance Office exploring constructs for agile design and development of space systems. He was also the program manager of DARPA’s simulation-based design effort, which pioneered the use of virtual prototyping technology in the form of advanced integration frameworks, product modeling techniques, software agent-based services, and multidisciplinary optimization. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Mr. Gersh was director of research for the Vanguard Information Technology Strategy Program within Computer Sciences Corporation’s subsidiary index. Before that, Mr. Gersh was a program manager for the Information Technology Office at DARPA, where he managed a portfolio of research and advanced technology development that focused on experimental information systems architectures, engineering, and integration. Mr. Gersh received a B.S. in computer engineering from Lehigh University and an M.B.A. from the University of West Florida. Elizabeth A. Holm is a distinguished member of the technical staff in the Compu- tational Materials Science and Engineering Department at Sandia National Labo- ratories. She is a computational materials scientist with a long-standing interest in bringing materials modeling to industrial practice. Over her 14 years at Sandia, she has worked on simulations to improve processes that make materials for advanced

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i n t e g r at e d c o m P u tat i o na l m at e r i a l s e n g i n e e r i n g  lighting, on prediction of microcircuit aging and reliability, and on the processing of innovative bearing steels. Her research areas include the theory and modeling of microstructural evolution in complex polycrystals, the physical and mechanical response of microstructures, and the wetting and spreading of liquid metals. Dr. Holm obtained her B.S.E. in materials science and engineering from the University of Michigan, an S.M. in ceramics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a dual Ph.D. in materials science and engineering and scientific computing from the University of Michigan. She has received several professional honors and awards, is a fellow of ASM International, and serves on the National Materi- als Advisory Board and the board of directors of TMS. Dr. Holm has authored or coauthored more than 90 publications. Richard LeSar is professor and chair of the Department of Material Science and Engineering at Iowa State University. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the Uni- versity of Michigan and an A.M. and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. He spent many years at Los Alamos National Laboratory, serving in a number of research and management positions. Dr. LeSar’s work focuses on the development and applica- tion of theory, modeling, and simulation of materials structures and properties. He is interested in modeling at many scales, with recent applications of electronic structure calculations (perovskites), atomistic simulations (molecular and metallic systems), and mesoscale simulations (dislocation dynamics). He currently works on employing dislocation simulations to guide the development of new theories of plasticity and the development of coarse-grained descriptions of biomolecules for simulating large-scale molecular processes. Dr. LeSar is a member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and also serves as a member of the editorial board of the Annual Reviews of Materials Research. He is a past editor of Computational Materials Science. Mike Long recently joined the high-performance computing group at Microsoft. Before that, he was a visual supercomputing manager at SGI, where he was respon- sible for high-performance scientific visualization served to geographically remote users. Prior to SGI, Mr. Long was a senior applications analyst for Linux Networx, where he was responsible for porting and benchmarking manufacturing and pro- cess integration and design optimization applications. Prior to joining Linux Net- worx, Mr. Long was a senior consulting engineering at Engineous Software and a senior applications analyst specializing in high-performance applications for Cray and SGI, where he pioneered many of the optimization efforts, including automo- tive crashworthiness design optimization and injection molding optimization. Mr. Long received master’s and bachelor’s degrees in structural analysis from Brigham Young University.

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aPPendix a  Adam C. Powell IV is principal at Opennovation, an engineering consulting firm in the Boston area. Opennovation provides services in materials process analysis and installation, training, customization, and support of open-source engineering analysis tools. Dr. Powell’s technical background is in materials science, with a focus on process technology, including applications in metals, polymers, and thin films. He also has expertise in polymer membranes, electrochemistry, mechanical behavior of materials, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, physical vapor deposition, computer modeling, and high-performance computing and has developed open- source phase field, boundary element, and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) software. Dr. Powell received S.B. degrees in economics and materials science and engineering, as well as a Ph.D. in materials engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before founding Opennovation, Dr. Powell was a manag- ing engineer at Veryst Engineering LLC. Prior to joining Veryst, Dr. Powell was on the faculty of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. Before MIT, he was a metallurgist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. John (Jack) J. Schirra is the manager of the Engine Systems Integration & Tech- nology Program Office organization in the Materials and Processes Engineering Department at Pratt & Whitney. Prior to that he was manager of the Materials Characterization and Service Investigations groups. He has over 20 years’ experi- ence in jet engine materials starting at P&W after graduating from Lehigh Univer- sity (1984) with a B.S. in materials engineering and metallurgy. While employed at P&W he has also received an M.S. in metallurgy (1987) from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.B.A. (2001) from Purdue University. He has over 20 technical publications and presentations and has served on the program committees for both the International Symposium on Superalloys and the Special Emphasis Symposium on Superalloy Inco 718. Throughout most of his career he has worked in structural materials and process development. He has made a significant contribution to the development and utilization of structural materials behavior modeling at P&W starting with integrated empirical superalloy models. Deborah Demania Whitis is section manager for structural materials development at GE Aviation, responsible for 9 development engineers, 11 materials behavior analysts, and 11 materials testing technicians. Her research group focuses on sup- porting materials application, development, and repair engineering, as well as life management and design, by developing new structural materials for aircraft engines; conducting specialized materials testing; performing statistical analysis and materials modeling; and publishing materials design curves. She is the depart- ment focal point for materials and process modeling tools. Dr. Whitis received a B.S.

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i n t e g r at e d c o m P u tat i o na l m at e r i a l s e n g i n e e r i n g  in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.S. in materials science from the University of Cincinnati, and a Ph.D. in materials science and engi- neering from the University of Virginia. Her academic and industrial experience has involved the development of constitutive models for microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior for high-temperature aerospace alloys. Dr. Whitis served as the modeling task leader for DARPA’s AIM program, coordinating the efforts of industry, university, and government laboratory resources to develop multiscale microstructure and property models for nickel-based superalloys. She is a founding member of the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) Techni- cal Advisory Group (TAG) for TMS, and she serves as a member of the High- Temperature Alloys Committee of the Structural Materials Division and the Shap- ing and Forming Committee of the Materials Processing and Manufacturing Divi- sion of TMS. She is also a member of the ASME and ASM. Christopher Woodward is a principal materials research engineer in the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Currently he manages the High-Temperature Metals Development Group, consisting of eight materials scientists and four materials characterization and testing technicians. Areas of research include a wide range of computational materials science and engineering methods ranging from electronic structure and dislocation dynamics to crystal plasticity methods, novel microstructure testing, and physical metallurgy. Dr. Woodward earned a B.S. in physics from the University of Massachusetts and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in solid state physics from the University of Illinois. His areas of research include computational materials science, effects of chemistry on alloy thermodynamics and plasticity, electronic structure of complex systems, novel boundary condition methods, dislocation dynamics, and high-performance computing. He has given 25 invited talks at international conferences and produced 55 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Woodward is the recipient of the Eshbach Fellowship from Northwestern University and the AFOSR Star Team Award (for excellence in basic research) and was an award finalist for the 2005 Charles J. Cleary Scientific Achievement Award at the AFRL.