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APPENDIXES

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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members JAN van SCHILFGAARDE received his Ph.D. in soil physics and agricul- tural engineering in 1954. At present he is associate director of the North- ern Plains Area, Agricultural Research Service in Fort Collins, Colorado. Previously he was director of the U.S. Salinity Laboratory, Department of Agriculture, Riverside, California. He has published over 60 documents, primarily in soil and water management, and is a member of American So- ciety of Agricultural Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineering, American Society of Agronomists, and the Soil Conservation Society of America. Jan van Schilfgaarde is also a member of the National Research Council's Board on Agriculture and a member of the National Academy of ~ _ . . , ~ nglneerlng. WILLIAM H. ALLAWAY received his Ph.D. in 1945 from Iowa State University and an honorary D.Sc. from the University of Nebraska in 1971. He has been a professor (soils) at Iowa State; director, U.S. Plant, Soil and Nutrition Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture; and advisor to the U.S. Chilean minister of agriculture. His research has centered on soil chemistry and on trace elements (especially selenium) in soils, plants, and animals. He is professor emeritus, Cornell University. ERNEST E. ANGINO received his Ph.D. in geochemistry in 1961 from the University of Kansas, where he is professor of geology and chairman of that department. He has been a member of the National Research Council's U.S. National Committee on Geochemistry and vice-chairman, technical 131

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132 IRRIGATION-INDUCED WATER QUALITY PROBLEMS advisory committee, Committee on Resources and Development, Federal Power Commission. He was awarded the Antarctic Service Medal by the U.S. Department of Defense. His research has involved trace element complexing in natural waters and sediment-water interactions. MARGRIET F. CASWELL received a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics in 1983 at the University of California, Berkeley. She is assistant professor of economics~and environmental studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. The majority of her recent research concerns agricultural water issues in California, with particular interest in the interactions be- tween water demand, waste water production, and irrigation technology choice. She has been a postgraduate research economist for the Gian- nini Foundation of Agricultural Economics, a lecturer in the economics of resource conservation, and a consultant. EDWIN H. CLARK II received a B.S. in engineering from Yale University in 1960, an M.S. (water resources engineering) and M.A. (economics) in 1966 from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton in 1971. Dr. Clark is an expert in water quality and agricultural management issues. He has worked as a consulting engineer for Harza and did research in Pakistan relative to water supplies for agriculture. He taught economics at Williams College and served as a senior staff member at the Council on Environmental Quality through 1978. For three years (until 1981), Dr. Clark served as deputy director of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances, where he was concurrently a special assistant to the administrator. Until recently, he was vice president of The Conservation Foundation's water resources program. He is now secretary of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control for the state of Delaware. CHARLES T. Dul\IARS received his B.S. from Oregon State University and his J.D. from Arizona State University in 1969. He is a member of the bar in both New Mexico and Arizona. At present, he is professor of law at the University of New Mexico. Previously he was chief counsel of the New Mexico Legal Rights Demonstration Land Grant Project. His area of expertise is in water law. WILFORD R. GARDNER received a Ph.D. in physics from Iowa State College in 1953. His research has been in measurement of soil moisture by neutron scattering; soil physics; movement of fluids in porous media; soil-water plant relations; soil salinity; plant biophysics; and environmental physics. He is dean, College of Natural Resources, University of California at Berkeley. Previously he was with the department of soils, water, and

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 133 engineering at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He has been a National Science Foundation senior fellow at Cambridge University and a Fulbright lecturer, University of Ghent. Dr. Gardner is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. ROLF HARTUNG received his Ph.D. in 1964 at the University of Michigan, and in 1980 he was designated diplomat, American Board of Toxicology. At the University of Michigan he is a professor of environmental toxicology in the Department of Environmental and Industrial Health. Previously he was chairman of the toxicology program there. CHARLES D. D. HOWARD received M.S. degrees from the University of Alberta (1962) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1966~. He is president of the consulting engineering firm Charles Howard and Associates, Ltd., located in Victoria, British Columbia, and has special- ized in water resources systems analysis. He has developed innovative mathematical and computer methods for water resources operations and planning, including implementation of water quality models for nonpoint runoff and in-stream processes related to irrigation return flows and trans- port of hazardous chemicals. He has served agencies of the United Nations and Canadian federal, provincial, and municipal governments and has par- ticipated in many studies for U.S. agencies and utilities. L. DOUGLAS JAMES received B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., and Ph.D. (1965) de- grees from Stanford University. He has held several teaching and consulting positions and is director of the Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State University. He has broad expertise in water resources planning and Hood hydraulics and was chairman of the National Research Council's Committee on a Levee Policy for the National Flood Insurance Program, whose report was provided to the Federal Emergency Management Agency in October 1982. He is also a former member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. WILLIAM M. LEWIS, JR., received his Ph.D. in zoology with a minor in mathematics from Indiana University in 1973. He was a research associate and subsequently adjunct assistant professor of zoology at the University of Georgia between 1973 and 1974. In 1974, he moved to the University of Colorado at Boulder as assistant professor of biology. At the University of Colorado he held the rank of assistant professor from 1978 to 1982 and of professor after 1982. He is director of the University of Colorado Center for Limnology. Dr. Lewis was a Guggenheim fellow in 1980 to 1981 and has previously served on National Research Council committees, including the Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on Glen

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134 IRRIGATION-INDUCED WATER QUALITY PROBLEMS Canyon Environmental Studies. His interests include aquatic food chains, the trophic status of lakes, the chemistry of surface water, mass transport by large rivers, and interactions between floodplains and rivers. ROBERT R. MEGLEN received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Colorado in 1971. He is director of the Analytical Laboratory of the Center for Environmental Sciences and is also adjunct professor in the chemistry department at the University of Colorado at Denver. His research interests are in the area of analytical applications of optical spectroscopy and ion chromatography. For many years he has conducted trace element research on a variety of environmental problems, including energy development, nutrition, drinking water standards, and ground and surface water contamination. Dr. Meglen was appointed to membership on the Water Science and Technology Board in 1988. FRANCOIS M. M. MOREL received his Ph.D. in engineering sciences from California Institute of Technology in 1971. He is currently graduate officer, department of civil engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- ogy, Cambridge. His fields of interest lie in theoretical and experimental studies on the effects and fate of chemical pollutants; computer modeling of chemical characteristics of natural and polluted waters; coordination chemistry and photochemistry of trace metals in natural waters; interac- tions between the chemistry and microbiota in aquatic systems; and trace metal nutrition and toxicity in phytoplankton. He has served on a National Research Council panel on marine mineral technology and was a member of the committee on ocean waste transportation. ISHWAR P. MURARKA is manager of Electric Power Research Institute's Land and Water Quality Studies Program. Previously, he was an environ- mental scientist at the Argonne National Laboratory and a faculty member at Northern Illinois University and North Carolina State University. He holds several advanced degrees, including a Ph.D. in soil science (Oregon State University, 1971~. He has expertise in waste management, pollutants in the environment, and subsurface water quality. He is active in profes- sional organizations and has published 70 scientific papers, many related to ground water quality. He is a consultant to the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is a Certified Professional Soil Scientist. OSCAR E. OLSON received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 1948. He is professor emeritus at South Dakota State University. He has been dean of the graduate school, South Dakota State University; visiting professor, Institute of Enzyme Research, University of

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 135 Wisconsin/Madison; visiting scientist, U.S. Plant, Soil, and Nutrition Labo- ratory, New York; member of the National Research Council subcommittee on nutrient and toxic elements in water; member of the NRC panel on agricultural uses of water; and member of the NRC panel on medical and biological effects of environmental pollutants selenium. His research has dealt with selenium and nitrate poisoning and calcium metabolism in poultry. W. SCOTT OVERTON received an M.S. in wildlife management in 1950 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in experimental statistics from North Carolina State University in 1964. He has been professor of forest science at Oregon State University and visiting professor at Emory University and Cornell University. His research interests are in statistics and ecology, spatial distributions, population dynamics, evolutionary and growth processes, modeling, general systems theory, ecosystem theory, and resource management. He is with the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University. ALBERT L. PAGE received his B.A. from the University of California at Riverside in 1956 and his Ph.D. in soil science from the University of Cali- fornia at Davis in 1960. His area of expertise is in soil chemistry. Presently he is professor of soil science at the University of California, Riverside. Previously he was director of the University of California Division of Agricultural Sciences, Kerney Foundation of Soil Science. His research interests include chemical and mineralogical properties of soils; chemistry of hydrolyzable metals in colloid systems; ion exchange equilibrium; and environmental trace metal contamination. He was a Guggenheim and Full- bright fellow and is a member of the Soil Science Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy. MERILYN B. REEVES is a member of the Board of Directors of the League of Women Voters of the United States. She chairs the Advocacy Issues Committee for the national league. From 1980 to 1984 she served as the natural resources coordinator of the national board. She has been a member of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council; chair of the State of Maryland Hazardous Substances and Low-Level Nuclear Waste Council; member of the Department of Energy's Environmental Commit- tee; and member of the Maryland and Chesapeake Bay Legislative Advisory Commission. She holds an M.S. degree from Northern State College in South Dakota. KENNETH D. SCHMIDT received a Ph.D. in hydrology from the Univer- sity of Arizona, Tucson, in 1971. He is a registered geologist in the states

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136 IRRIGATION-INDUCED WATER QUALITY PROBLEMS of California, Arizona, and Oregon and a ground water quality consultant in Phoenix. Since 1964 he has worked on numerous ground water inves- tigations in the San Joaquin Valley. He has participated in the Basin 5D studies by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, evaluating salt loading to ground water, impacts of irrigation on salinity, and fertilizer contributions to nitrate concentration. He has evaluated the impacts of ir- rigation on ground water quality as a member of an irrigation and drainage division task force of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He has also performed a detailed evaluation of the effect of irrigation on ground water quality in the Salt River valley of Arizona. R. RHODES TRUSSELL received his Ph.D. in 1972 at the University of California, Berkeley. His principal expertise lies in the areas of water quality and water treatment for domestic and industrial use as well as chemistry. He has served on a National Research Council committee on drinking water additives and as technical chairman, American Water Works Association's Particulates Committee. DANIEL E. VVIL~RD is an ecologist and wetlands biologist. He received an JOB. in biology (1959) from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in zoology (1966) from the University of California at Davis. He taught zoology at the University of Texas from 1966 to 1970 and then at the University of Wisconsin through 1977. He has taught at the University of Oregon's Institute of Marine Biology and at Cornell University's Shoals Marine Laboratory. Currently he is professor and director of environmental science and policy programs in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and professor of biology at Indiana University, Bloomington.