D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

E. JOHN GALLAGHER, M.D. (Chair), is university chair of the department of emergency medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center where he serves as a professor in the departments of emergency medicine, medicine, and epidemiology and population health. Dr. Gallagher’s research targets out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, measurement and management of acute pain, and diagnostic testing and reasoning. For more than 30 years, he has focused on strategies to optimize care of the medically underserved inner-city population of the Bronx. Dr. Gallagher received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1972. His service to professional organizations includes serving as president of the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine and as editor of several medical journals. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on a wide range of emergency medicine topics. Dr. Gallagher served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee for Developing Reusable Facemasks for Use During an Influenza Pandemic, as a consultant to the IOM Committee on Increasing Rates of Organ Donation, and as a reviewer for the IOM report Hospital-Based Emergency Care: At the Breaking Point. Dr. Gallagher was elected a member of the IOM in 2002.


ROGER L. BARKER, Ph.D., is the Burlington Distinguished Professor in the department of textile engineering, chemistry, and science at North Carolina State University and director of the Center for Research on Textile Protection and



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D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members E. JOHN GALLAGHER, M.D. (Chair), is university chair of the department of emergency medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center where he serves as a professor in the departments of emergency medicine, medicine, and epidemiology and population health. Dr. Gallagher’s research targets out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, measurement and management of acute pain, and diagnostic testing and reasoning. For more than 30 years, he has focused on strategies to optimize care of the medically underserved inner- city population of the Bronx. Dr. Gallagher received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1972. His service to professional organizations includes serving as president of the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine and as editor of several medical journals. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on a wide range of emergency medicine topics. Dr. Gallagher served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Commit- tee for Developing Reusable Facemasks for Use During an Influenza Pandemic, as a consultant to the IOM Committee on Increasing Rates of Organ Donation, and as a reviewer for the IOM report Hospital-Based Emergency Care: At the Breaking Point. Dr. Gallagher was elected a member of the IOM in 2002. ROGER L. BARKER, Ph.D., is the Burlington Distinguished Professor in the department of textile engineering, chemistry, and science at North Carolina State University and director of the Center for Research on Textile Protection and 

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the peRsonal pRotectIve technology pRogRam nIosh at  Comfort. He has been engaged in research and standards development for pro- tective clothing for more than 20 years and is internationally recognized for his work in the field of protective clothing systems. Dr. Barker has published many technical papers on the protective properties of textile materials and clothing and on testing methods used for evaluation. He is active in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), ASTM International, and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) committees involved in the development of standards for measurement for personal protective equipment. Dr. Barker holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from the University of Tennessee and a Ph.D. in textile and polymer science from Clemson University. HOWARD J. COHEN, Ph.D., is a professor and chair of the occupational safety and health department at the University of New Haven. He formerly was the manager of industrial hygiene at the Olin Corporation and editor-in-chief of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Journal. He is a graduate of Boston University where he received a B.A. degree in biology. Dr. Cohen received his master of public health and doctorate of philosophy degrees in industrial health from the University of Michigan. He is certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene (CIH) by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Dr. Cohen is the former chair of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z88.2 committee on respiratory protection and a current member of the editorial board of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. He is the past chair of the AIHA’s respiratory protection committee, a past president of the Connecticut River Valley Chapter of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, and a past officer and treasurer of the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. JANICE COMER-BRADLEY, M.A., is technical director of the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA), where she directs the voluntary standards- setting activities of 13 product groups representing suppliers of safety and health equipment. She works closely with federal regulatory agencies and outside standards bodies to influence activities that affect the manufacture, use, and distribution of safety equipment, and she represents ISEA on numerous standards committee and government panels. Ms. Bradley earned a B.S. degree from the University of Dayton and a master’s degree in environmental studies from Brown University. Ms. Bradley has spent her entire career in the safety and health field. Prior to her work at ISEA she was the director of environmental health and safety for the Rockefeller Univer- sity in New York City, the university health and safety officer for Brown University, and the safety specialist for the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Dayton, Ohio. Ms. Bradley is a certified safety professional by the American Soci- ety of Safety Engineers and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University where

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appendIx d  she teaches a graduate-level course in the M.B.A. program that introduces future business leaders to workplace safety and health issues. She served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Review of the NIOSH-BLS Respirator Use Survey Program. ELIZABETH A. CORLEY, Ph.D., is assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. She is also an affiliated faculty member in the Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes (CSPO) and the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. Dr. Corley’s current research is focused on the areas of evaluation and science policy. Her funded research projects focus on the development of innovative methodologies for program evaluation, the evaluation of science and engineering research centers, and the social impacts of science. Dr. Corley is currently principal investigator for the external evalua- tion of the Learning in Formal and Informal Environments Center funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and serves as a co-principal investigator for the NSF-funded Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU). She currently serves as a member of the editorial board for Research Evaluation. Prior to joining ASU in 2003, Dr. Corley held teaching and research positions at Columbia University, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Bucknell University. While attending the Georgia Institute of Technology, she earned three degrees in civil engineering and a Ph.D. in public policy. RICHARD M. DUFFY, M.Sc., has been involved with worker occupational health and safety issues for more than 30 years, the past 29 years at the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), where he is assistant to the general president, responsible for the IAFF’s activities addressing occupational medicine, safety, and health. He has been involved in numerous committees involving firefighters’ and other workers’ safety and health, including those of the federal government, state governments, NFPA, ANSI, and ISO. He has been actively involved in addressing protective clothing and equipment for workers. He served as chairman of the NFPA Technical Correlating Committee for Fire and Emergency Services Protec- tive Clothing and Equipment. He directed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Federal Emergency Management Agency program Project FIRES (Firefighters Integrated Response Equipment System), which under the auspices of the IAFF continues to work toward the development of state-of-the-art protective clothing and equipment, including the management of the new IAFF initiative Project HEROES (Homeland Emergency Response Operational and Equipment Systems). Mr. Duffy is responsible for the coordination and technical aspects of the IAFF-IAFC (International Association of Fire Chiefs) Joint Wellness-Fitness Initia- tive for Fire Fighters, including the Wellness-Fitness Program, and has been directly

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the peRsonal pRotectIve technology pRogRam nIosh at 0 responsible for IAFF efforts in addressing infectious diseases, including pandemic flu and proper recommendations for personal protective equipment. He has served as a member on the NRC Panel for Fire Research. Mr. Duffy holds bachelor of sci- ence degrees in environmental health and in business management and a master of science degree in occupational and environmental health sciences. JAMES S. JOHNSON, Ph.D., C.I.H., QEP, has worked at the Lawrence Liver- more National Laboratory (LLNL) since 1972. His position from November 2000 was section leader of the Chemical and Biological Safety Section of the Safety Programs Division. Throughout his career at LLNL, Dr. Johnson was involved with respiratory protection and personal protective equipment as the respiratory program administrator, research scientist, and division and section manager. He is an AIHA fellow; a member of the NFPA Technical Correlating Committee on Fire and Emergency Services Protective Clothing and Equipment; a member of the NFPA Respiratory Protection Equipment Committee; past chair of the International Society for Respiratory Protection, Americas Section; secretariat chair of the ANSI Z88 for Respiratory Protection; and a member and secretary of the AIHA Respirator Committee. He is also a member of the AIHA Protective Clothing and Equipment Committees and the Emergency Preparedness and Response Task Force. Dr. Johnson retired from LLNL on July 1, 2006, and is now a part-time consultant. JIMMY PERKINS, Ph.D., C.I.H., is professor of environmental and occupa- tional health at the University of Texas School of Public Health. He received his B.A. at the University of Texas at Austin and his Ph.D. and M.S. in environmental health science at the University of Texas-Houston. Dr. Perkins served as a professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health and has also worked in the petroleum industry and for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Dr. Perkins’ research has focused on the permeation of chemicals through protective clothing and all aspects of dermal exposure risk management, including skin permeation models and mechanisms and the statisti- cal aspects of chemical exposure assessment. Dr. Perkins is a certified industrial hygienist. He serves as a member of the IOM standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment in the Workplace. DAVID PREZANT, M.D., is the chief medical officer (Office of Medical Af- fairs) and senior pulmonary consultant to the New York City Fire Department (FDNY) and is professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and research director for the Pulmonary Division. He received his bachelor of science from Columbia College in 1977 and his doctor of medicine from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1981. Dr. Prezant is board-certified in internal medicine,

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appendIx d  pulmonary medicine, and critical care medicine. He is a member of the John P. Redmond IAFF Medical Advisory Board and represents FDNY as a member of the technical committee for the Fire Service Joint Labor Management Wellness-Fitness Initiative. Dr. Prezant is co-director of the NIOSH-funded FDNY World Trade Center Monitoring and Treatment Programs and is principal investigator for their Data Coordinating Center. KNUT RINGEN, Dr.P.H., is a private consultant in disease management; envi- ronment, safety, and health risk management; workers’ compensation; and group health insurance. Dr. Ringen specializes in the development of research and service programs, with an emphasis on workers and other special populations, and has been instrumental in developing many health programs that have achieved national significance. He has served as the director of the Center to Protect Workers’ Rights and executive director of the Laborers’ National Health and Safety Fund. Among many honors, he has been elected to the European Academy of Sciences and the Collegium Ramazzini. He received his doctor of public health degree from Johns Hopkins University for his research on the development of health policy, a master’s degree in hospital administration from the Medical College of Virginia, and a mas- ter of public health degree from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Ringen served as a member of the IOM Committee on the Assessment of the NIOSH Head-and-Face Anthropometric Survey of U.S. Respirator Users. EMANUEL P. RIVERS, M.D., M.P.H., is vice chairman and director of research for the department of emergency medicine and senior staff attending physician in the Surgical Critical Care Unit and the Emergency Department at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Rivers received his master of public health and doctorate of medicine degrees from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He completed a residency in emergency and internal medicine at Henry Ford Hospi- tal, followed by a fellowship in cardiac critical care medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. He is board-certified in critical care medicine, emergency medicine, and internal medicine. Dr. Rivers is a fellow and recipient of a national research award from the American College of Physicians, Society of Academic Emergency Medicine, and the American College of Chest Physicians. His research interests focus on early detection and treatment of shock, particularly sepsis. Dr. Rivers was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 2005. JOSEPH J. SCHWERHA, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and director of the Occu- pational and Environmental Medicine Residency Program at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh; master’s degree in public health,

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the peRsonal pRotectIve technology pRogRam nIosh at  specializing in environmental health and industrial hygiene, from the University of Michigan; and medical degree from West Virginia University. He is board- certified in occupational medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medi- cine. Dr. Schwerha was general manager of health services and medical director at U.S. Steel for 30 years. He was awarded the 2005 William S. Knudsen Award by the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, an inter- national medical society of more than 6,000 physicians and health professionals. Dr. Schwerha is a member of the IOM standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment in the Workplace and serves on the Committee to Review the NIOSH Traumatic Injury Program. ANUGRAH SHAW, Ph.D., a textile technologist, is a professor at the Univer- sity of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) and has conducted research on protective clothing for pesticide applicators for more than two decades. Her research includes work related to standardization of test methods, development of performance specifications, and studies related to the development and evaluation of personal protective equipment for hot climates. Dr. Shaw was responsible for the creation of an extensive database that includes data for more than 130 fabrics that were evalu- ated at UMES. This database has been used to develop an online system for work and protective clothing. Dr. Shaw serves as the technical contact for ASTM and ISO standards and performance specifications for protective clothing for pesticide applicators, and as an ISO delegate for a subcommittee on protective clothing. She has presented at numerous national and international conferences, published in several refereed journals, and written a book chapter on the selection of personal protective equipment. She received her Ph.D. in textile technology from Texas Woman’s University. TONYA L. SMITH-JACKSON, Ph.D., is director of the Assessment and Cog- nitive Ergonomics Laboratory, associate professor of human factors engineering in the Grado Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and adjunct as- sociate professor of psychology in the department of psychology at Virginia Tech. She received a Ph.D. degree in psychology-ergonomics from North Carolina State University in 1998. She is also director of the Human Factors Engineering and Er- gonomics Center and associate director of the Center for Innovation in Construc- tion Safety and Health at Virginia Tech. Her research interests range from safety information presentation and comprehension in occupational and recreational settings to cognitive ergonomics. She is on the editorial board of Ergonomics in Design and the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. Dr. Smith-Jackson is president of the Safety Technical Group of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and is a past member of the ANSI Z535 Committee.

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appendIx d  FRAMEWORK COMMITTEE LIAISON SUSAN E. COZZENS, Ph.D., is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology and director of its Technology Policy and Assessment Center. She earned her Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. She is cur- rently working on research in the fields of science, technology, and inequalities; she continues to work internationally on developing methods for research assess- ment, as well as science and technology indicators. Prior to joining the faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology, she was director of the NSF Office of Policy Support. Dr. Cozzens has served as a consultant to numerous organizations, in- cluding the Office of Science and Technology Policy, National Science Foundation, Office of Technology Assessment, General Accounting Office, National Cancer Institute, National Institute on Aging, and National Institutes of Health (NIH). She has served on several NRC and IOM committees, including Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process, Assessment of Centers of Excellence Programs at NIH, and Research Standards and Practices to Prevent the Destructive Applica- tion of Biotechnology, and is currently a member of the Committee to Review the NIOSH Hearing Loss Research Program. Dr. Cozzens is the past editor of Science, Technology, & Human Values and the Journal of the Society for Social Studies of Sci- ence. She currently is the coeditor of Research Evaluation. BOARD ON HEALTH SCIENCES POLICY LIAISON MARTHA N. HILL, Ph.D., is dean and professor at the Johns Hopkins Uni- versity School of Nursing. She holds joint appointments in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. Dr. Hill, the 1997-1998 president of the American Heart Association, is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. She serves on the IOM Board on Health Sciences Policy and was the co-vice chair of the IOM report Unequal Treatment: Confronting Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Health Care. Dr. Hill received her bachelor of science degree in nursing from Johns Hopkins University, her master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, and her doctoral degree in behavioral sciences from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Dr. Hill is internationally known for her work and research in preventing and treating hypertension and its complications among underserved blacks, particularly among young, urban black men. She is an active investigator and consultant on several NIH-funded clinical trials. She has published extensively and serves on numerous review panels, editorial boards, and advisory committees including the Board of Directors of Research!America. Dr. Hill has also consulted on hypertension and other cardiovascular-related issues in countries outside the United States, including South Africa, Scotland, Israel, and Australia.

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