Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

MILTON D. HAKEL (Chair) is the Ohio Board of Regents eminent scholar in industrial and organizational psychology at Bowling Green State University, where he has been a faculty member since 1991. Known for his work in the area of certification and employment testing, his research interests include the roles of formative assessments in learning and performance; assessment and development of managerial, executive, and other social skills; observation, impression formation, behavior prediction, and decision making, as in employment interviews, assessment centers, and performance appraisals; employee selection; and job analysis and job performance. He has published numerous articles and three books on employment testing, certification, selection, validation, and adult learning and intellectual development. At the National Academies, Hakel served on the Board on Testing and Assessment (BOTA) and its Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality. He has a B.A. in psychology and philosophy (1963) and a Ph.D. in psychology (1966) from the University of Minnesota.


ALEXANDRA BEATTY (Senior Program Officer) is a staff member in the Center for Education. She was staff director for the Committee on Educational Excellence and Testing Equity, which issued reports on the testing of English language learners and on measuring dropout rates, as well as a staff member of BOTA and the Board on International Comparative Studies in Education (BICSE). Prior to joining the National Research Council (NRC), she was a Program Administrator for the Educational Testing Service, and she has also served as the Senior Project Director for Education for the



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff MILTON D. HAKEL (Chair) is the Ohio Board of Regents eminent scholar in industrial and organizational psychology at Bowling Green State Univer- sity, where he has been a faculty member since 1991. Known for his work in the area of certification and employment testing, his research interests include the roles of formative assessments in learning and performance; assessment and development of managerial, executive, and other social skills; observation, impression formation, behavior prediction, and decision making, as in employment interviews, assessment centers, and performance appraisals; employee selection; and job analysis and job performance. He has published numerous articles and three books on employment testing, certification, selection, validation, and adult learning and intellectual devel- opment. At the National Academies, Hakel served on the Board on Testing and Assessment (BOTA) and its Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality. He has a B.A. in psychology and philosophy (1963) and a Ph.D. in psychology (1966) from the University of Minnesota. ALEXANDRA BEATTY (Senior Program Officer) is a staff member in the Center for Education. She was staff director for the Committee on Educa- tional Excellence and Testing Equity, which issued reports on the testing of English language learners and on measuring dropout rates, as well as a staff member of BOTA and the Board on International Comparative Studies in Education (BICSE). Prior to joining the National Research Council (NRC), she was a Program Administrator for the Educational Testing Service, and she has also served as the Senior Project Director for Education for the 

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 ASSESSING ACCOMPLISHED TEACHING Committee for Economic Development, and as an independent writer and researcher. She has a B.A. in philosophy from Williams College and an M.A. in history from Bryn Mawr College. JULIAN BETTS is professor of economics and adjunct professor of inter- national relations and Pacific studies at the University of California, San Diego, as well as a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. His research has focused on the economic analysis of public schools, specifi- cally the link between student outcomes and measures of school spending, including class size, teachers’ salaries, and teachers’ level of education. His work has also examined the role that standards and expectations play in student achievement and has included studies of various forms of school choice and an evaluation of San Diego’s Blueprint for Student Success. His other main areas of research include higher education; immigration; tech- nology, skills, and the labor market; and the economics of unions. At the National Academies, he served on the Committee on Improving Measures of Access to Equal Educational Opportunity. He has a B.S. in chemistry (1984) from McGill University, an M.S. in economics (1986) from the Uni- versity of Oxford, England, and a Ph.D. in economics (1990) from Queen’s University, Ontario. MARK DYNARSKI is senior fellow and associate director of research at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., where he has worked since 1988. Prior to that, he was an associate professor of economics at the University of California, Davis. His work focuses on education policy, particularly evaluating programs for at-risk children and youth and school-community partnerships, and he has published numerous reports and articles on these topics. He currently is directing the What Works Clearinghouse for the Institute of Education Sciences, for which he previously served as princi- pal investigator of the dropout prevention area. He is directing a national study of education technology and previously directed a national study of after-school programs. Both evaluations used random assignment designs to measure effects on student learning. He has conducted a wide variety of re- search, including evaluations of dropout prevention programs, Early Head Start, and alternative high schools. He has a B.A. in economics from the State University of New York at Geneseo (1977) and a Ph.D. in economics from the Johns Hopkins University (1982). STUART W. ELLIOTT (Senior Program Officer) is director of BOTA at the NRC, where he has worked on a variety of projects related to assess- ment, accountability, teacher qualifications, and information technology. Previously, he worked as an economic consultant for several private-sector consulting firms. He was also a research fellow in cognitive psychology

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 APPENDIX B and economics at Carnegie Mellon University and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology. ADAM GAMORAN is a professor of sociology and educational policy studies and director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research focuses on inequality in education and school reform. He is the author or coauthor of books on school and district capacity to support teacher-driven instructional change, stratification in higher education, and standards-based reform and the poverty gap. Gamoran is an elected member of the National Academy of Education and has been a visiting professor at Tel Aviv University and the University of Edinburgh. At the National Academies, he has served on a variety of committees, including BICSE, and is currently a member of the Board on Science Education. He also chairs the Independent Advisory Panel of the National Assessment of Career and Technical Education for the U.S. Department of Education. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago (1984). JANE HANNAWAY is the director of the Education Policy Center at the Urban Institute. She is an organizational sociologist whose work focuses on the study of educational organizations, specifically elementary/secondary schools, employment and education, school and teacher evaluations, standards-based reform, and vouchers. Her recent research focuses on structural reforms in education, particularly accountability, competition, and choice. She was recently appointed director of the Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Databases in Education at the Urban Institute. She has authored or coauthored several books and numerous papers in education and management journals. She is a past vice president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and has served on its executive board. She is an elected member of the Council of the Association for Public Policy and Management. Hannaway has served on the editorial board of a number of journals and is past editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, the main policy journal of the American Educational Research Association. She is currently on the executive board of the AERA. She has a Ph.D. in the sociology of education from Stanford University. RICHARD INGERSOLL is professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to his current position, Ingersoll was a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at the University of Georgia and as a classroom teacher in public and private schools. His research is concerned with the character of elementary and secondary schools as work- places, teachers as employees, and teaching as a job. He has published nu-

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 ASSESSING ACCOMPLISHED TEACHING merous articles, reports, and pieces on the management and organization of schools, the problem of underqualified teachers, the debate over school accountability, the problems of teacher turnover and teacher shortages, the status of teaching as a profession, and the degree to which schools are centralized or decentralized and its impact on school performance. He has received a number of awards, including the Richard B. Russell Award for Excellence in Teaching from the University of Georgia; the Harry Braverman Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems, for his work on organizational control and accountability in schools; and an AERA fellowship. Ingersoll has conducted numerous briefings of local, state, and federal policy makers and been invited to present his research before many groups. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania (1992). MICHAEL T. KANE has been director of research at the National Con- ference of Bar Examiners in Madison, Wisconsin, since 2001. Previously he was professor of education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. From 1982 to 1991, he was vice president for research and senior research scientist at ACT, Inc., where he worked on a variety of testing programs, including admissions and placement tests and licensure and certification tests. From 1976 to 1982, Kane was the director of test development at the National League for Nursing, which prepared licensure tests and achieve- ment tests in nursing. He has published a number of articles on various aspects of testing, particularly on validity theory, generalizability/reliability theory, and standard setting both in general and in the context of licensing and certification testing. He has a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College (1965), an M.S. in physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1967), and an M.S. in statistics (1970) and a Ph.D. in education (1972) from Stanford University. DEIRDRE J. KNAPP is vice-president and director of the Assessment, Training, and Policy Studies Division at the Human Resources Research Organization. Her 25-year career has focused primarily on developing employment credentialing assessments and conducting validation research studies, and she specializes in the area of designing performance assessments. Knapp has been involved with testing in a wide variety of occupations and employment settings, including a screening assessment for the Army’s For- eign Language Recruitment Initiative; credentialing examinations for legal administrators, independent medical examiners, nursing home administra- tors, physical therapists, system administrators, and veterinary surgeons; and a variety of selection and screening assessments used for jobs in the military. She has published numerous articles, technical reports, and book chapters and served as editor for a book on exploring the limits in person-

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 APPENDIX B nel selection and classification. She has a B.A. in psychology (1980) from Ohio University and M.A. (1983) and Ph.D. (1984) degrees in industrial and organizational psychology from Bowling Green State University. JUDITH A. KOENIG (Study Director) is a senior program officer for BOTA, where, since 1999, she has directed measurement-related studies designed to inform education policy. This work has included studies on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), inclusion of special needs students in assessment programs, developing assessments for state and federal accountability programs, and setting standards for the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. From 1984 to 1999, she worked at the Asso- ciation of American Medical Colleges on the Medical College Admission Test, directing operational programs and leading a comprehensive research program on the examination. Prior to that, she worked for 10 years as a special education teacher and diagnostician. She has a B.A. (1975) in special education from Michigan State University, an M.A. (1984) in psychology from George Mason University, and a Ph.D. (2003) in educational measure- ment, statistics, and evaluation from the University of Maryland. SUSANNA LOEB is an associate professor of education at Stanford Uni- versity. She specializes in the economics of education and the relationship between schools and federal, state, and local policies. She studies school finance reform, specifically how the structure of state finance systems affects the level and distribution of funds to districts. Her work also involves studying the teacher labor market and how changing job opportunities for women college graduates affect the pool of potential teachers. Of particular interest are the factors associated with teachers’ choices to work in urban areas and with low-performing students. She has published numerous jour- nal articles and book chapters on these topics. Loeb has received a number of awards, including outstanding dissertation awards by the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management and the American Education Finance Association, the Parker Prize for Labor Economics issued by the University of Michigan, and the Stanford School of Education Teaching Award. She has bachelor’s degrees in civil engineering and political science from Stanford University (1988) and an M.P.P. (1994) and a Ph.D. in eco- nomics (1998) from the University of Michigan. JAMES H. LYTLE is practice professor of educational leadership at the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1998 to 2006, Lytle was superintendent of the Trenton public schools, where he led an aggressive effort to implement New Jersey’s urban educa- tion reform initiative. Prior to his appointment in Trenton, he served in a variety of capacities in the school district of Philadelphia as an elementary,

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20 ASSESSING ACCOMPLISHED TEACHING middle, and high school principal; executive director for planning, research, and evaluation; regional superintendent; and assistant superintendent. Lytle has been active in a number of national professional organizations, includ- ing the Council of Great City Schools, the Cross Cities Campaign, and the AERA. He has written and presented frequently on the improvement of urban schooling. His research interests relate to increasing the efficacy of urban public schools and leading school change efforts. Currently he is a consultant to the Wallace/Reader’s Digest Foundation project on school leadership development. Lytle has a B.A. from Cornell University, an M.A. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a Ph.D. in education from Stanford University. C. FORD MORISHITA is a biology teacher at Clackamas High School in Clackamas, Oregon. He has done much work for the Oregon Department of Education, serving on the K-12 Science Education Standards and As- sessment Panel, the Oregon Science Leaders Institute and Outreach, and the Professional Development Design Team for Math and Science. He also served as Teacher in Residence at Portland State University for the Oregon Collaborative for Excellence in Preparation of Teachers in 1997-1998. At the National Academies, he served on the Committee on Assessment and Teacher Quality and, from 2002 to 2007, contributed much work as a founding member of the Teacher Advisory Council. He currently serves on Smithsonian’s National Advisory Board for the National Science Resource Center and as a founding member of the Education Advisory Council for the Oregon Chalkboard Project. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Oregon Milken Educator Award; the 1997 Oregon Teacher of the Year; the Oregon Academy of Sciences Citation for Science Teach- ing; the 1994 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching; the Outstanding Biology Teaching Award from the National Association of Biology Teachers; and the Tandy Technology Scholar for Science Teaching. He has an M.A.T. in biological sciences and B.S. in biology from Lewis and Clark College. LYNN W. PAINE is associate professor of teacher education and adjunct professor of sociology and women’s studies at Michigan State University. In addition to teaching courses related to comparative education, teacher learning, feminist analyses of education, and social foundations in teacher education, she has taught in the Women’s Studies Program, helped develop and teach a transcollegiate course (Growing Up in Three Societies), and taught a graduate seminar in the sociology of education in the Department of Sociology. Her work has focused on comparative and international edu- cation and the sociology of education, with an emphasis on the relation- ship between education policy and practice, the links between education

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2 APPENDIX B and social change, and issues of inequality and diversity. Her publications include a number of journal articles, book chapters, and books. At the National Academies, she was a member of the Committee on Continuing to Learn from TIMSS and served on BICSE from 1995 to 2003, serving as vice chair from 2001 to 2003. She has a B.A. in East Asian Studies from Princeton University (1975) and an M.A. in sociology (1982) and a Ph.D. in international development education (1986) from Stanford University. NEIL SMELSER is a professor of sociology (emeritus) at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has been a faculty member since 1958. His work and research interests include sociological theory, economic so- ciology, collective behavior, sociology of education, social change, and comparative methods. He has written numerous books and articles on a wide range of sociological and behavioral science topics. He has received many honors and awards, including election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1968, the American Philosophical Society in 1976, and the National Academy of Sciences in 1993. Smelser has a long history of service to the National Academies. He was a member of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education from 1995 to 2003, serv- ing as chair from 2001 to 2003. He has served on numerous committees studying social science issues, including techniques for enhancing human and organizational performance and sociological aspects of terrorism and security. Smelser has a B.A. in social relations (1952) and a Ph.D. in sociol- ogy (1958) from Harvard University. He has a B.A. from Magdalen College at Oxford University (1954) and an M.A. (1959) from the Final Honours School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. He is also a graduate of the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute. BRIAN STECHER is a senior social scientist in the education unit at RAND. His research focuses on measuring educational quality and im- provement, with an emphasis on assessment and accountability systems. His current projects include the National Longitudinal Study of No Child Left Behind for U.S. Department of Education, a multistate study of the implementation of standards-based accountability for the National Sci- ence Foundation, an examination of the use of formative assessment for instructional improvement, and a study of the effect of reform-oriented instruction in mathematics and science. He recently completed a four-year evaluation of the California Class Size Reduction initiative. Stecher has served on a number of expert panels for the National Academies, and he is a member of the Technical Design Group advising the California Depart- ment of Education on the state’s accountability system. He has published widely in professional journals and is currently a member of the editorial board of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and the Educational

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22 ASSESSING ACCOMPLISHED TEACHING Assessment Journal. Stecher has a B.A. in mathematics from Pomona Col- lege, an M.A. in mathematics from the University of Oregon, and a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Los Angeles. ANA MARIA VILLEGAS is professor of curriculum and teaching at Montclair State University. Her work has ranged in focus from the educa- tional needs of students with limited English proficiency, to recruiting and preparing nontraditional teacher candidates of color, to preparing cultur- ally responsive teachers. She has conducted studies of culturally responsive teaching, policies and practices in the education of immigrant students, effective instructional practices in bilingual classrooms, increasing the diver- sity of the teaching force, and strategies for transforming teacher education for diversity. Her honors include the Educational Testing Service’s Research Scientist Award, the Early Career Award from the Committee on the Role and Status of Minorities in Research and Development of the AERA, and the Margaret B. Lindsey Award for Distinguished Research in Teacher Education of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. In March 2003 she was chosen as distinguished visiting professor by the doctoral faculty in the Educational Leadership Program at Johnson and Wales University. She has a B.A. in English from St. Peters College (1972), an M.A. in urban education from Hunter College (1975), and a Ph.D. in curriculum and teaching from New York University. DOROTHY Y. WHITE is associate professor in the Department of Math- ematics and Science Education at the University of Georgia, where she has worked since 1997. Previously she was an instructor in the Department of Mathematics at Piedmont College, an instructor with the American Busi- ness Institute in Bronx, New York, and a classroom teacher at Pequenos Souls Daycare. Her scholarly work has focused on the areas of equity in mathematics education, discourse in elementary school mathematics class- rooms, teacher and student interaction in elementary school classrooms, and the mathematical experiences of female adolescents of color. She has received a number of awards for her teaching, including Honors Day Award for Teaching from the University of Georgia and Outstanding New Scholar from the University of Maryland. White served as the editor for Teaching Children Mathematics Focus Issue in 2004. She also has extensive grant- writing experience and was awarded several U.S. Department of Education grants through the Eisenhower Program for Improving Mathematics and Science Instruction. She has a Ph.D. in mathematics education (1997) from the University of Maryland. KAREN K. WIXSON is dean and professor of education at the University of Michigan and has been a member of the faculty since 1980. Prior to

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2 APPENDIX B receiving her doctorate in reading education at Syracuse University, she worked both as a remedial reading and a learning disabilities teacher. She has published widely in the areas of literacy curriculum, instruction, and assessment, and is coauthor of a popular text on the assessment and instruc- tion of reading and writing problems. She has been a long-time consultant to NAEP reading tests and served on the Planning Committee for the devel- opment of the 2007 NAEP Reading Framework. She recently served as codirector and principal investigator of the U.S. Department of Education’s Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement. At the National Academies, Wixson served on the Committee on Embedding NAEP in State Assessments. She has a B.A. in behavioral disabilities (1972) from Univer- sity of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A. in leaning disorders (1975) from the State University of New York at Binghamton, and an M.A. (1978) and Ph.D. (1980) in reading education from Syracuse University.

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