Appendix
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Thomas Dietz (Chair) is professor of sociology and of crop and soil sciences, director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program, and assistant vice president for environmental research at Michigan State University. His research interests include the role of deliberation in environmental decision making, the human dimensions of global environmental change and cultural evolution. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Danforth fellow, and past president of the Society for Human Ecology. He is the recipient of the distinguished contribution award from the Section on Environment, Technology, and Society of the American Sociological Association and of the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America. He holds a bachelor’s degree in general studies from Kent State University and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California at Davis.


Gail Bingham is president of RESOLVE and has been a practicing mediator for 30 years with a focus on the environment and natural resources. She has served as a mediator for a variety of local, state and federal agencies and private parties on such diverse subjects as the economic implications of proposed climate change legislation, geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide, regulatory policy under the Safe Drinking Water Act, national wetlands policy, watershed management and pollutant policy, children’s health protection, allocation of water rights, hydroelectric relicensing, chemicals policy, hazardous waste management, and community land use and infrastructure issues. She also is the author of several publications, including Resolving Environmental Disputes: A Decade of Experience, When the



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Appendix Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Thomas Dietz (Chair) is professor of sociology and of crop and soil sci- ences, director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program, and assis- tant vice president for environmental research at Michigan State University. His research interests include the role of deliberation in environmental decision making, the human dimensions of global environmental change and cultural evolution. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Danforth fellow, and past president of the Society for Human Ecology. He is the recipient of the distinguished contri- bution award from the Section on Environment, Technology, and Society of the American Sociological Association and of the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America. He holds a bachelor’s degree in general studies from Kent State University and a Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California at Davis. Gail Bingham is president of RESOLVE and has been a practicing mediator for 30 years with a focus on the environment and natural resources. She has served as a mediator for a variety of local, state and federal agencies and private parties on such diverse subjects as the economic implications of proposed climate change legislation, geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide, regulatory policy under the Safe Drinking Water Act, national wet- lands policy, watershed management and pollutant policy, children’s health protection, allocation of water rights, hydroelectric relicensing, chemicals policy, hazardous waste management, and community land use and infra- structure issues. She also is the author of several publications, including Resolving Environmental Disputes: A Decade of Experience, When the 

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00 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Sparks Fly: Building Consensus When the Science Is Contested, and Seeking Solutions: Alternative Dispute Resolution and Western Water Issues. She was the 2006 recipient of the Mary Parker Follett Award from the Associa- tion for Conflict Resolution. She received a B.S. degree from Huxley College of Environmental Studies in Washington State and did graduate work in environmental planning at the University of California at Berkeley. Jennifer Brewer (Program Officer) is now an assistant professor in the Department of Geography and the Institute for Coastal Science and Policy of East Carolina University. Her research investigates models of environ- mental governance, especially in the areas of marine resources and climate change. Prior to her work on this study at the National Research Council, she worked in the areas of environmental policy, natural resource manage- ment, and international voluntary service. She held a fellowship in the U.S. House of Representatives, positions on the staff and board of Volunteers for Peace, and staff and consulting positions with nonprofit and governmental organizations involved in fisheries and coastal resources. She has a B.A. degree with high honors from the University of Michigan, an M.S. degree in marine policy from the University of Maine, and a Ph.D. in human ge- ography from Clark University. Caron Chess is a professor in the Department of Human Ecology at Rutgers University. She conducts research on the evaluation of public participation and the impact of organizational factors on public participation and risk communication. She has served as the president of the Society for Risk Analysis and she currently sits on the editorial board of Risk Analysis and the boards of two journals of environmental communication. In addition to publishing in academic journals, she has also authored publications that are used widely by government and industry practitioners, including Communi- cating with the Public: Ten Questions Environmental Managers Should Ask and Improving Dialogue with Communities: A Short Guide to Government Risk Communication, which has been translated into three languages. Prior to her academic career, she coordinated environmental programs for state government and environmental organizations and played a central role in the campaign for the country’s first public access right-to-know law. She received an M.S. degree from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. degree from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Michael L. DeKay is an associate professor in the Department of Psychol- ogy at Ohio State University. Previously, he was an associate professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University.

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0 APPENDIX His research concerns judgment and decision making, particularly in the environmental and medical domains. With colleagues at Carnegie Mellon, he developed and assessed a deliberative method for ranking health, safety, and environmental risks, with specific attention to the validity and replica- bility of the resulting rankings. His current projects involve precautionary reasoning, distortion of outcome and probability information in risky de- cisions, and the appropriateness of aggregating outcomes across repeated decisions. He has authored or coauthored numerous journal articles and book chapters, including many articles in Risk Analysis and Medical Deci- sion Making. He holds a B.S. in chemistry from Caltech (1985), an M.S. in chemistry from Cornell (1987), and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in social psychol- ogy from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Jeanne M. Fox is president of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and serves as a member of the governor’s cabinet. She also serves on several committees of the National Association of Regulatory Commissioners and on the advisory council to the board of directors and the executive com- mittee of the Electric Power Research Institute. She is chair of the National Council on Electricity Policy. Previously, she was regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with responsibility for New Jer- sey, New York, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and she also served as commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protec- tion and Energy and as New Jersey’s commissioner on the interstate Dela- ware River Basin Commission. She has also been a visiting distinguished lecturer at the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and a visiting lecturer in public and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. She received a bachelor’s degree from Douglass College and a J.D. degree from Rutgers University School of Law. Steven C. Lewis is president and principal scientist of Integrative Policy & Science, Inc. (IPSi), which provides consulting services in general toxicology, qualitative and quantitative assessment of risk from environmental hazards, science policy, and legislative/regulatory affairs. Prior to founding IPSi, he held various positions at Exxon-Mobil, including manager of the petroleum and synthetic fuels group. His research and safety assessment activities focused on potential health risks from exposure to chemical carcinogens, toxicants to the nervous system, and chemical hazards to reproductive health, and he also had responsibility for public and community affairs, including management of a multi-stakeholder process to address concerns of rural Alaskans after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and has served on the editorial boards of five scientific journals. He is an adjunct professor at the University of Medi-

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0 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION cine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and a senior fellow at the University of Texas at Dallas. He holds a B.A. degree in chemistry from Indiana University and a Ph.D. degree in toxicology from the Indiana University School of Medicine. Gregory B. Markus is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan and a research professor in the Center for Political Studies at the university’s Institute for Social Research. His research, teaching, and public work focus on political participation and urban politics, primarily in the United States. He has worked for more than 25 years with organizations at the local, state, national, and international levels that build the capacities of individuals and communities to devise and implement practical strategies to address public issues. He previously served as vice president of MOSES, a community organizing project based in Detroit, and he is board chair of the Harriet Tubman Center for Community Organizing, also based in De- troit. He is a past recipient of the sociopsychological prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Amoco Award for excellence in teaching. He holds a Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Michigan. D. Warner North is president and principal scientist of the consulting firm NorthWorks, Inc., and a consulting professor in the Department of Man- agement Science and Engineering at Stanford University. Over his career, he has carried out applications of decision analysis and risk analysis for electric utilities in the United States and Mexico, for the petroleum and chemical industries, and for government agencies with responsibility for energy and environmental protection. He has served as a member and consultant to the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Pro- tection Agency since 1978, and he previously served as a member of the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Yale University and a Ph.D. degree in operations research from Stanford University. Ortwin Renn serves as full professor and chair of environmental sociology at Stuttgart University. He directs the Interdisciplinary Research Unit for Risk Governance and Sustainable Technology Development at the University of Stuttgart and DIALOGIK a nonprofit research institute for the investigation DIALOGIK, of communication and participation processes in environmental policy mak- ing. He is also the elected deputy dean of the Economics and Social Science Department and acting director of the Institute of Social Sciences at the Uni- versity of Stuttgart. He work focuses primarily on risk governance, political participation, and technology assessment. He is a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the International Risk Governance Council in Ge-

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0 APPENDIX neva and the European Academy of Science and Arts, and he serves on the senate of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and on the governing board of the German National Academy of Technology and Engineering. He also chairs the State Sustainability Commission. His is a recipient of an hon- orary doctorate from the Swiss Institute of Technology and the distinguished achievement award of the Society for Risk Analysis. He holds a doctoral degree in sociology and social psychology from the University of Cologne. Margaret A. Shannon is the associate dean for undergraduate education and faculty development and professor in the Rubenstein School of Envi- ronment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. She is also a professor in honor on the faculty of forest and environmental sciences at the University of Freiburg, where she teaches international environmental governance and supervises doctoral students. Previous academic appoint- ments were at the Buffalo Law School, State University of New York (SUNY); the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syra- cuse University; the College of Forestry of the University of Washington; the College of Environmental Science and Forestry of SUNY Syracuse; and at the Lewis and Clark Law School. Her research focuses on the emergence of a participatory approach that actively engages people and organizations in creating new modes of environmental governance. She received B.A. degrees in anthropology and sociology from the University of Montana and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in natural resource management, policy, and sociol- ogy from the School of Renewable Natural Resources at the University of California at Berkeley. Paul C. Stern (Study Director) is a principal staff officer at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences and director of its stand- ing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level; participatory processes for informing environmental decision making; and the governance of environmental re- sources and risks. He is coauthor of the textbook Environmental Problems and Human Behavior (2nd ed., 2002); coeditor of numerous National Research Council publications, including Decision Making for the En- vironment: Social and Behavioral Science Priorities, The Drama of the Commons, Making Climate Forecasts Matter, Understanding Risk, and Energy Use: The Human Dimension. His coauthored article in Science, “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” won the 2005 Sustainability Sci- ence Award from the Ecological Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He holds a B.A. degree from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, all in psychology.

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0 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Seth Tuler (Consultant) has been a senior researcher at SERI since its founding in 1995. His research interests are focused on the human dimen- sions of natural resource management and environmental remediation, including public participation and risk communication. He seeks to apply insights emerging from research to practical applications in a wide range of policy arenas, including the clean-up of contaminated sites, marine oil spill response, fisheries management regulations, worker and public safety in national parks, and wildland fire management. He has also been involved with a variety of projects to facilitate environmental health education, training, and public participation with community residents affected by contamination from U.S. nuclear weapons production and related facilities. He is a member of the Board of Scientific Advisors’ Subcommittee for the National Center for Environmental Research of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Elaine Vaughan is professor emerita and research professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California at Irvine. Her research interests include risk communication, public understanding and use of scientific risk information, cultural val- ues and beliefs and their influence on psychological responses to risk and uncertainty, risk perceptions of culturally and socioeconomically diverse populations, and measurement issues related to research that targets such social groups. She has designed and conducted numerous studies on com- munity reactions to both conventional and nontraditional or extreme risk events with an emphasis on the effects of uncertain and evolving informa- tion on responses. She has published numerous scientific articles on these topics. She has served on numerous national and state committees, includ- ing the joint White House-Congressional Advisory Board on Veterans’ Dose Reconstruction, the University of California’s Scientific Advisory Panel on the Disposal of Low Level Radioactive Waste, and California’s Project on Comparative Risk Policy. She received a B.A. degree in psychology from the University of California at Los Angeles and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from Stanford University. Thomas J. Wilbanks is a corporate research fellow at the Oak Ridge Na- tional Laboratory and leads the laboratory’s Global Change and Develop- ing Country Programs. A past president of the Association of American Geographers, he conducts research on such issues as sustainable develop- ment, energy and environmental technology and policy, responses to global climate change, and the role of geographical scale in all of these regards. His recently coedited books include Global Change and Local Places, Geographical Dimensions of Terrorism, and Bridging Scales and Knowl- edge Systems: Linking Global Science and Local Knowledge. For the Inter-

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0 APPENDIX governmental Panel on Climate Change, he is the coordinating lead author for the Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group II, Chapter 7 (industry, settlement, and society); for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, he is the coordinating lead author for the Synthesis and Assessment Product (SAP 4.5) on the effects of climate change on energy production and use in the United States, and lead author for the section of another SAP (4.6) on effects of global change on human health and welfare and human systems.

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