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America’s Energy Future Project

In 2007, the National Academies initiated a major study titled “America’s Energy Future: Technology Opportunities, Risks, and Tradeoffs,” to inform the national debate about the nation’s energy future. The America’s Energy Future (AEF) project is planned to include two phases (Figure A.1). Phase I will produce a series of five reports. The first is a summary of discussions at the National Academies’ March 2008 energy summit convened to provide input to the deliberations of the Committee on America’s Energy Future. Three reports produced by separately constituted panels will also provide material for consideration by the full AEF study committee in its report on the current and future potential of existing and new energy supply and demand technologies, their associated impacts, and projected costs. Phase I of the AEF project will serve as the foundation for a Phase II portfolio of subsequent studies at the Academies and elsewhere focused on more strategic, tactical and policy issues, such as energy research and development priorities, strategic energy technology development, policy analysis, and many related subjects.

A key objective of the AEF project is to facilitate a productive national policy debate about the nation’s energy future.



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A America’s Energy Future Project I n 2007, the National Academies initiated a major study titled “America’s Energy Future: Technology Opportunities, Risks, and Tradeoffs,” to inform the national debate about the nation’s energy future. The America’s Energy Future (AEF) project is planned to include two phases (Figure A.1). Phase I will produce a series of five reports. The first is a summary of discussions at the National Academies’ March 2008 energy summit convened to provide input to the deliberations of the Committee on America’s Energy Future. Three reports produced by separately constituted panels will also provide material for con- sideration by the full AEF study committee in its report on the current and future potential of existing and new energy supply and demand technologies, their associated impacts, and projected costs. Phase I of the AEF project will serve as the foundation for a Phase II portfolio of subsequent studies at the Academies and elsewhere focused on more strategic, tactical and policy issues, such as energy research and development priorities, strategic energy technology development, policy analysis, and many related subjects. A key objective of the AEF project is to facilitate a productive national policy debate about the nation’s energy future. 

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 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE Phase I Committee on America's Energy Future Chair, Harold T. Shapiro Summit Summary Subgroups Panel on Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Chair, Lester B. Lave Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas Nuclear Power Panel on Electricity from Renewable Sources Renewable Energy Chair, Lawrence T. Papay Panel on Alternative Liquid Alternative Fuels for Transportation Fuels Transportation Chair, Michael P. Ramage Electric Power Transmission and Distribution Cross-cutting and Integration Issues Phase II FIGURE A.1 America’s Energy Future Project. A-1

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 APPENDIX A COMMITTEE ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE HAROLD T. SHAPIRO (IOM), Princeton University, Chair MARK S. WRIGHTON, Washington University, Vice Chair JOHN F. AHEARNE (NAE), Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society ALLEN J. BARD (NAS), University of Texas, Austin JAN BEYEA, Consulting in the Public Interest W.F. BRINKMAN (NAS), Princeton University DOUGLAS M. CHAPIN (NAE), MPR Associates, Inc. STEVEN CHU (NAS), E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CHRISTINE A. EHLIG-ECONOMIDES (NAE), Texas A&M University, College Station ROBERT W. FRI, Resources for the Future, Inc. CHARLES H. GOODMAN, Southern Company Services, Inc. (retired) JOHN B. HEYWOOD (NAE), Massachusetts Institute of Technology LESTER B. LAVE (IOM), Carnegie Mellon University JAMES J. MARKOWSKY (NAE), Independent Consultant RICHARD A. MESERVE (NAE), Carnegie Institution for Science WARREN F. MILLER, JR. (NAE), Texas A&M University-College Station FRANKLIN M. ORR, JR. (NAE), Stanford University LAWRENCE T. PAPAY (NAE), PQR, LLC ARISTIDES A.N. PATRINOS, Synthetic Genomics, Inc. MICHAEL P. RAMAGE (NAE), ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company (retired) MAXINE L. SAVITZ (NAE), Honeywell, Inc. (retired) ROBERT H. SOCOLOW, Princeton University JAMES L. SWEENEY, Stanford University G. DAVID TILMAN (NAS), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis C. MICHAEL WALTON (NAE), University of Texas, Austin PANEL ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY LESTER B. LAVE (IOM), Carnegie Mellon University, Chair MAXINE L. SAVITZ (NAE), Honeywell, Inc. (retired), Vice Chair R. STEPHEN BERRY (NAS), University of Chicago MARILYN A. BROWN, Georgia Institute of Technology LINDA R. COHEN, University of California, Irvine MAGNUS G. CRAFORD (NAE), LumiLeds Lighting PAUL A. DECOTIS, State of New York, Office of the Governor JAMES DEGRAFFENREIDT, JR., WGL Holdings, Inc. HOWARD GELLER, Southwest Energy Efficiency Project DAVID B. GOLDSTEIN, Natural Resources Defense Council ALEXANDER MACLACHLAN (NAE), E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (retired)

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 THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMIT ON AMERICA’S ENERGY FUTURE WILLIAM F. POWERS (NAE), Ford Motor Company (retired) ARTHUR H. ROSENFELD, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory DANIEL SPERLING, University of California, Davis PANEL ON ELECTRICITY FROM RENEWABLE SOURCES LAWRENCE T. PAPAY (NAE), PQR, LLC, Chair ALLEN J. BARD (NAS), University of Texas at Austin, Vice Chair RAKESH AGRAWAL (NAE), Purdue University WILLIAM L. CHAMEIDES (NAS), Duke University JANE H. DAVIDSON, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis J. MICHAEL DAVIS, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory KELLY FLETCHER, GE Global Research CHARLES F. GAY, Applied Materials, Inc. CHARLES GOODMAN, Southern Company Services, Inc. (retired) SOSSINA M. HAILE, California Institute of Technology NATHAN S. LEWIS, California Institute of Technology KAREN L. PALMER, Resources for the Future, Inc. JEFFREY M. PETERSON, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority KARL RABAGO, AES Corporation CARL J. WEINBERG, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (retired) KURT E. YEAGER, Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (retired) PANEL ON ALTERNATIVE LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS MICHAEL P. RAMAGE (NAE), ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company (retired), Chair G. DAVID TILMAN (NAS), University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Vice Chair DAVID GRAY, Noblis ROBERT D. HALL, CDG Management, Inc. EDWARD A. HILER (NAE), Texas A&M University-College Station (retired) W.S. WINSTON HO (NAE), Ohio State University DOUGLAS R. KARLEN, Iowa State University JAMES R. KATZER (NAE), Independent Consultant MICHAEL R. LADISCH (NAE), Purdue University JOHN A. MIRANOWSKI, Iowa State University MICHAEL OPPENHEIMER, Princeton University RONALD F. PROBSTEIN (NAS/NAE), Massachusetts Institute of Technology HAROLD H. SCHOBERT, Pennsylvania State University

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 APPENDIX A CHRISTOPHER R. SOMERVILLE (NAS), University of California, Berkeley GREGORY STEPHANOPOULOS (NAE), Massachusetts Institute of Technology JAMES L. SWEENEY, Stanford University