Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members John T. Christian, Chair, NAE, is one of the nation’s leading geotechnical engineers and a consulting engineer. He spent much of his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at Stone & Webster Engi- neering Corporation, where he was a vice president before he left to go into private practice. Dr. Christian has published over 90 papers and three books in the geotechnical and earthquake engineering fields. He is currently a consulting engineer in Boston and Newton, Massachusetts. Dr. Christian has actively served as a fellow and former chair of the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the organization that oversees the accreditation of engineering programs at universities. He is also a former chair of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Geotechnical Engineering Division and edited the Society’s Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering. An honorary member of ASCE and of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers Section, ASCE, Dr. Christian is the dis- tinguished recipient of several honors and awards. In 1996, he received ASCE’s Thomas A. Middlebrook Award for a paper on the uses of reliabil- ity approaches in which he applied probabilistic concepts to geotechnical engineering. In 1999 he was elected to the National Academy of Engi- neering. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from MIT. Bilal M. Ayyub is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environ- mental Engineering at the University of Maryland and director of the 0

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0 ASSESSMENT OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION’S SECURITY PROGRAM Center for Technology and Systems Management. He is engaged in research on uncertainty modeling and analysis, systems modeling, deci- sion analysis, homeland security, various defense and infrastructure systems, safety systems, and mathematical modeling using statistics, probability theory, fuzzy sets, and the theory of evidence. He is a fellow of the ASCE, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME). Dr. Ayyub is a recipient of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE) “Jimmie” Hamilton Award for the best paper in the Naval Engi- neers Journal in 1985, 1992, 2000, and 2002; an award for the outstanding research-oriented paper in the ASCE Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management in 1987; the ASCE Edmund Friedman young Engineer Award for Professional Achievement, 1989; the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society’s k.S. Fu Award for Distinguished Service, 1995; the ASCE Walter L. Huber Research Prize, 1997; and several leader- ship and distinguished service awards. He is the founder and cochair of the International Symposia on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis. Dr. Ayyub is the author or coauthor of about 450 publications, including many books and textbooks. Dr. Ayyub holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of kuwait and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology. george H. Baker III is a member of the faculty at James Madison Univer- sity and is involved in consulting with industry and government in the areas of critical infrastructure assurance, high-power electromagnetics, and nuclear and directed-energy weapon effects. He is the former direc- tor (1996-1999) of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Springfield Research Facility, where he was involved in assessing, protecting, and targeting critical underground, infrastructure, and mobile systems. He was instrumental in organizing the initial Joint Chiefs of Staff force protec- tion program and assessment teams. Much of his career was spent at the Defense Nuclear Agency directing RDT&E related to hardening systems to nuclear effects. He is the recipient of the Defense Nuclear Agency’s Legacy and Technical Achievement awards. He is presently a member of the congressional EMP Commission staff and a member of the Executive Board of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Homeland Secu- rity Division. He is a founding member of the Virginia Alliance for Secure Computing and Networking and of the Directed Energy Professional Society. He is past chair of the Nonproliferation and Arms Control Tech- nology Working Group focus group on buried facilities, the Underground Site Infrastructure Applications Working Group, and the International Technical Cooperation Program EMP Group. He is an EMP fellow and senior member of the IEEE.

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0 APPENDIX A Dwight A. Beranek is vice president and operations manager at Michael Baker, Jr., Inc., where he is program executive for the Federal Emergency Management Agency map modernization project. Mr. Beranek recently retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), where he served for more than 35 years in a variety of management and leadership posi- tions. Most recently, he was deputy director of military programs at USACE’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. In that position, he provided senior executive direction and leadership for multi-billion-dollar-per-year military construction programs. Previously, he was the chief of engineer- ing and construction serving as USACE’s civilian chief engineer for civil works and military missions. Before that, he served as director of engi- neering for the Great Lakes and Ohio River Division, working extensively with military, state, and local officials to deliver military construction and water resources projects. Mr. Beranek served as a member of the Federal Highway Administration’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Bridge and Tunnel Secu- rity and led the establishment of the Infrastructure Security Partnership, a network of more than 100 professional organizations dedicated to reduc- ing the vulnerability of our nation’s built environment to terrorism and natural threats. He is a member of the Society of American Military Engi- neers (SAME), the ASCE, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. He is the recipient of the President’s Medal of SAME and the President’s Medal of ASCE. He was also awarded the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Senior Executive for contributions in the federal government. Mr. Beranek holds a B.S. in engineering from Northwestern University and master’s degrees in public administration from American University and in busi- ness administration from Boston University. Mark M. Hankewycz is director of security services at The Protection Engi- neering Group, PC. He has 20 years of security experience with expertise in planning and implementing integrated electronic security systems consist- ing of automated electronic entry control, intrusion detection, and camera systems. He has comprehensive experience in security guard force manage- ment, antiterrorism/force protection, policy and procedure development, security needs assessments, risk analysis, and threat assessments, and command-and-control systems integration. Mr. Hankewycz has developed security master plans and emergency preparedness and disaster recovery plans. He is a member of the National Fire Protection Association and the American Society for Industrial Security. Mr. Hankewycz holds a B.S. in business management from the University of Phoenix. Jeremy Isenberg, NAE, is recent past president and CEO of Weidlinger Associates, Inc., a structural and civil engineering and software develop-

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0 ASSESSMENT OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION’S SECURITY PROGRAM ment firm. Dr. Isenberg is an expert in the computational modeling of dynamic response of structures, especially those exposed to blast loads. He initiated the conversion of computational mechanics technology at Weidlinger Associates from defense applications to civilian uses such as geological prospecting, design of ultrasound search units for medi- cal imaging, and for optical inspection of submicron features on silicon wafers. He is active on several professional committees of ASCE and the American Concrete Institute and is recent past president of the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE. He served as a member of the Federal Highway Administration’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Bridge and Tunnel Secu- rity. He is the recipient of the ASCE Ernest Howard Award for contribu- tions to computational mechanics applied to blast effects on structures; of the C. Martin Duke Award for contributions to lifeline earthquake engineering; and of the Tewksbury Award of ASCE/SEI. He is a regis- tered civil or professional engineer in several states. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Isenberg received a B.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in structural engineer- ing from Cambridge University, where he was a Fulbright scholar. L. Michael Kaas retired as director of the Department of the Interior’s Office of Managing Risk and Public Safety. In that position he was respon- sible for facilities management, health and safety, and law enforcement and security policy in the Office of the Secretary. His 28-year career at DOI also included positions at the U.S. Bureau of Mines as associate director for information and analysis, chief of the Division of Resource Evaluation, chief of the Division of Environmental Technology Research, chief of the Office of Regulatory Projects Coordination, chief of the Division of Min- eral Information Systems, deputy director of minerals information and analysis, and planning officer. He is a recipient of DOI’s Distinguished Service Award and its Meritorious Service Award. Mr. kaas is a member and past director of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engi- neers and a recipient of the Herbert Hoover Award. He has authored many technical papers. Mr. kaas is a registered professional engineer in Minnesota and holds a B.S. in mining engineering from the Pennsylvania State University and an M.S. in mineral engineering from the University of Minnesota. David A. Klinger is associate professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. He previously held positions as assistant professor and associate professor of sociology at the University of Houston. Before pursuing his graduate degrees, he worked as a patrol officer for the Los Angeles and Redmond (Washington) police depart-

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 APPENDIX A ments. He has held research positions at the Police Foundation in Wash- ington, D.C.; the University of Washington, Seattle; the Washington State Attorney’s Office; and the Seattle Police Department. In 1997, Dr. klinger was the recipient of the American Society of Criminology’s inaugural Ruth Caven young Scholar Award for outstanding early career contri- butions to the discipline of criminology. Dr. klinger’s current research focuses on the organization and actions of the modern police. He has written more than 25 scholarly articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries on a variety of police-related issues. His book on officer-involved shootings, Into the Kill Zone: A Cop’s Eye View of Deadly Force, was pub- lished by Jossey–Bass in 2004. Dr. klinger holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington. Richard g. Little is director of the keston Institute for Infrastructure at the University of Southern California (USC), where he conducts research and develops policy studies to inform the discussion of infrastructure issues critical to California and the nation. Prior to joining USC, he was director of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environ- ment of the National Research Council (NRC), where he developed and directed a program of studies in building and infrastructure research. He has conducted numerous studies on life-cycle management and the financ- ing of infrastructure, project management, and hazard preparedness and mitigation and has published extensively on risk management and deci- sion making for physical security and critical infrastructure protection. Mr. Little has more than 35 years of experience in planning, management, and policy development relating to public facilities, including 15 years with local government. Mr. Little holds a B.S. in geology and an M.S. in urban-environmental studies from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. John A. McCarthy is the president of kamal Advisory Services, LLC, in Dubai. He was previously executive director and principal investigator of the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) project at the George Mason University School of Law, where he also holds a faculty appointment as research professor of security studies. Prior to joining the CIP project, Mr. McCarthy was a director in kPMG’s mid-Atlantic risk and advisory services practice, where he provided computer security, critical infra- structure, and business continuity management solutions to government clients. Prior to joining kPMG, Mr. McCarthy served as a member of the professional staff of the Critical Infrastructure Assurance Office, which supported the National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protec- tion, and Counter-terrorism at the National Security Council. He assisted in the development of an integrated national infrastructure assurance strategy to address risks and threats to the nation’s critical infrastructures.

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 ASSESSMENT OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION’S SECURITY PROGRAM He was a commissioned officer in the U.S. Coast Guard, where he served for more than 20 years in a wide variety of field command and senior staff positions. His military and civilian awards include the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal (three awards), the Combat Action Ribbon, and the Vice President’s National Partnership for Reinventing Govern- ment “Hammer” Award. He holds a B.A. degree in psychology from The Citadel Military College of South Carolina and an M.S. in information resource management from Syracuse University. Charles I. Mcginnis retired from the U.S. Army as a major general and was a former director of civil works for USACE; more recently he served in senior positions at the Construction Industry Institute in Austin, Texas. He has also served as a senior officer of Fru-Con Corporation and as the director of engineering and construction for the Panama Canal Company and later as vice president of the company and lieutenant governor of the Canal zone. As director of civil works, he was responsible for a $3 bil- lion per year planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance program of water-resource-oriented public works on a nationwide basis. He is a fellow of SAME, a fellow and life member of ASCE, and a charter member of the National Academy of Construction. He is a recipient of the U.S. Army’s Distinguished Service Medal. Mr. McGinnis is a registered professional engineer in Texas and Missouri and holds a master’s degree in civil engineering from Texas A&M University. Karlene H. Roberts is a professor at the Haas School of Business, Uni- versity of California at Berkeley, and a research psychologist at the Insti- tute for Business and Economics Research at Berkeley. Dr. Roberts has expertise in the design and management of organizations and systems of organizations in which errors can have catastrophic consequences. The results of her research have been applied to programs in numerous organizations, including the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, the Federal Aviation’s Air Traffic Control System, NASA, and the oil and gas, finan- cial, and medical industries. Dr. Roberts has published on a wide variety of organizational risk management issues. She is a fellow in the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Academy of Management. She has served on several NRC committees, including the Human Factors Committee, the Committee on NASA’s Bio- astronautics Critical Path Roadmap, the Committee on Work Environment for Nurses and Patient Safety, and the Committee on Core Competencies for Federal Facilities Asset Management. She has a B.A. in psychology from Stanford University, a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, and an honorary Ph.D. in management science from the Université Paul Cézanne Aix-Marseille III.

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 APPENDIX A Randy Rossman is a 20-year veteran of the Miami-Dade Police Depart- ment (MDPD). He holds the rank of sergeant and is currently assigned to the Homeland Security Bureau, which has the primary responsibility for gathering, analyzing, disseminating, and maintaining criminal intelligence and for homeland security initiatives for the MDPD and provides infor- mation to federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. In addition, the HSB conducts security and vulnerability assessments and identifies the security needs of critical infrastructures and sites within Miami-Dade County that could be targeted by terrorists. Sgt. Rossman supervises detectives assigned to the Infrastructure and Protections Section, which includes Miami International Airport and the Port of Miami. His section recently completed a buffer zone protection plan for the Turkey Point nuclear power plant. Sgt. Rossman holds a B.S. in economics from Florida State University. Craig D. uchida is president of Justice & Security Strategies, a consulting firm that focuses on homeland security, criminal justice, and public health issues. He provides training and technical assistance, develops and imple- ments research and evaluation plans, and assists in implementing change within local, state, and federal organizations. Dr. Uchida has more than 25 years of experience in criminal justice and has worked with more than 35 police agencies during his career. More recently, he has assisted agencies and organizations in homeland security issues. He assisted the Major Cities Chiefs Association with its terrorist alert policies, worked in Alaska on the continuity of operations/continuity of governance planning (COOP/COG), and documented the Los Angeles Police Department’s efforts to establish Operation Archangel, a multiagency approach to critical infrastructure pro- tection. In addition, he is an instructor in homeland security at the Naval Post-Graduate School. He previously served as assistant director for grants administration and as senior policy adviser, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services; as director, Office of Criminal Justice Research, National Institute of Justice (NIJ); and as director, Evaluation Division, NIJ, at the U.S. Department of Justice. He previously served as assistant professor, Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Uchida holds a B.A. from the University of California at San Diego, an M.A. in American history from the State University of New york at Stony Brook, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in criminal justice from the State University of New york at Albany.