APPENDIX F
JOINT COMMITTEES ON THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE CIVILIAN NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

U.S. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL COMMITTEE ROSTER

John F. Ahearne, Chair, is the director of the Ethics Program at Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, a lecturer in public policy at Duke University, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. Dr. Ahearne served in the U.S. Air Force from 1959 to 1970, resigning as a major. He has also served as deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense (1972-1977), in the White House Energy Office (1977), as deputy assistant secretary of energy (1977-1978), and as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (chairman, 1979-1981). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Sigma Xi, and the American Nuclear Society. From 2000 to 2003, he served as chairman of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management; he had served as a member of that board since 1993. He currently chairs the NRC Committee on Opportunities for U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Countering Radiological Terrorism, and has served on a number of other NRC committees. Dr. Ahearne holds a Ph.D.in physics from Princeton University.


Robert J. Budnitz joined the staff of the University of California’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in late 2007. Before that, he was associate program leader for nuclear systems safety and security in the energy and environment directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. From 2002 to 2004, he directed the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management’s program on science and technology. For twenty years prior to that, Dr. Budnitz was president of Future Resources Associates, Inc. in Berkeley, California. Previously, he served as deputy director and director of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, and he also held several management positions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. Dr. Budnitz’s professional interests are in environmental impacts, hazards, and safety analysis, particularly of the nuclear fuel cycle. He has been prominent in the field of nuclear reactor safety assessment and waste-repository performance assessment, including probabilistic risk assessment. He has



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APPENDIX F JOINT COMMITTEES ON THE INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE CIVILIAN NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES U.S. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL COMMITTEE ROSTER John F. Ahearne, Chair, is the director of the Ethics Program at Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, a lecturer in public policy at Duke University, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. Dr. Ahearne served in the U.S. Air Force from 1959 to 1970, resigning as a major. He has also served as deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense (1972-1977), in the White House Energy Office (1977), as deputy assistant secretary of energy (1977-1978), and as commissioner and chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (chairman, 1979-1981). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Sigma Xi, and the American Nuclear Society. From 2000 to 2003, he served as chairman of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management; he had served as a member of that board since 1993. He currently chairs the NRC Committee on Opportunities for U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Countering Radiological Terrorism, and has served on a number of other NRC committees. Dr. Ahearne holds a Ph.D.in physics from Princeton University. Robert J. Budnitz joined the staff of the University of California’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in late 2007. Before that, he was associate program leader for nuclear systems safety and security in the energy and environment directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. From 2002 to 2004, he directed the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management’s program on science and technology. For twenty years prior to that, Dr. Budnitz was president of Future Resources Associates, Inc. in Berkeley, California. Previously, he served as deputy director and director of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, and he also held several management positions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. Dr. Budnitz’s professional interests are in environmental impacts, hazards, and safety analysis, particularly of the nuclear fuel cycle. He has been prominent in the field of nuclear reactor safety assessment and waste-repository performance assessment, including probabilistic risk assessment. He has 155

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156 INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE served on numerous investigative and advisory panels of scientific societies, government agencies, and committees of the National Research Council. Dr. Budnitz received a B.A. degree from Yale University and a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Matthew Bunn is an associate professor in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His current research interests include nuclear theft and terrorism; nuclear proliferation and measures to control it; and the future of nuclear energy and its fuel cycle. Before joining the Kennedy School in January 1997, he served for three years as an adviser to the Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he played a major role in U.S. policies related to the control and disposition of weapons- usable nuclear materials in the United States and the former Soviet Union, and directed a secret study for President Clinton on security for nuclear materials in Russia. Previously, Bunn was at the National Academy of Sciences, where he directed the two-volume study Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium. He is the winner of the American Physical Society’s Joseph A. Burton Forum Award for “outstanding contributions in helping to formulate policies to decrease the risks of theft of nuclear weapons and nuclear materials,” and the Federation of American Scientists’ Hans Bethe Award for “science in service to a more secure world,” and is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a member of the Boards of Directors of the Arms Control Association and the Partnership for Global Security. Bunn is the author or co-author of over a dozen books and book-length technical reports (most recently including Securing the Bomb 2007), and scores of articles in publications ranging from Science and Nuclear Technology to Foreign Policy and The Washington Post. Dr. Bunn holds bachelors and masters degrees in political science and a doctorate in technology, management, and policy, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. William F. Burns, Major General (USA, retired), is a former director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and former commandant of the U.S. Army War College. He led the U.S. delegation on Safety, Security, and Dismantlement (SSD) of nuclear weapons, serving as ambassador in negotiations on the denuclearization of the former Soviet Union. He is a distinguished fellow at the Army War College and serves on several panels, advisory boards, and boards of trustees of governmental and non-profit organizations. He is judge emeritus of the Court of Judicial Discipline of Pennsylvania. General Burns co-chaired a National Academies study on overcoming impediments to U.S.-Russian cooperation on nuclear nonproliferation and is currently a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control. Steve Fetter is dean and professor at the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland. His research interests include arms control and nonproliferation, nuclear energy and releases of radiation, and climate change and carbon-free energy supply. He has been an advisor to many government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and scientific organizations, and has held visiting positions at Stanford, Harvard, and MIT. From 1993 to 1994, he was a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, and in 1992 and 2004, he was a visiting fellow at the State Department. He has served on several committees for the National Academies and is currently a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control. He holds a Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley, and an S.B. in physics from MIT.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 157 Rose Gottemoeller became director of the Carnegie Moscow Center in January 2006. She was previously a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, specializing in arms control, nonproliferation and nuclear security issues. From 1998 to 2000, she served in the Department of Energy as Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation and National Security and then as Deputy Under-secretary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation. From 1993 to 1994 she was Director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Affairs on the National Security Council in the White House. Ms. Gottemoeller co-chaired a National Academies joint consensus study on overcoming impediments to U.S.-Russian cooperation on nuclear nonproliferation and is currently a member of the Committee on International Security and Arms Control and chair of its Russia Dialogue. Ms. Gottemoeller has authored or co-authored several articles and book chapters on various aspects of nuclear nonproliferation, including Universal Compliance: A Strategy for International Security. Milton Levenson is internationally recognized for his ability to apply creative new insights to major engineering challenges in the nuclear industry and for his organizational and leadership skills. Currently an independent consultant, Mr. Levenson is a chemical engineer with more than 50 years of experience in nuclear energy and related fields. His technical experience includes work related to nuclear safety, fuel cycle, water reactors, advanced reactors, and remote control. His professional experience includes research and operations positions at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Bechtel. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976. Mr. Levenson is a fellow and past president of the American Nuclear Society, a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’' Robert E. Wilson Award in Nuclear Chemical Engineering. He is the author of more than 150 publications and presentations and holds three U.S. patents. Mr. Levenson has served as chairman or committee member for several National Academies studies and is currently a member of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. RUSSIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ROSTER Nikolay P. Laverov, co-chair, is vice president of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) and former director of the Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry. He has worked in and with the USSR and Russian governments on a range of ecological problems, particularly nuclear waste disposal, and has been a leader in radiogeological studies aimed at using the protective properties of the geological environment to prevent pollution of the ecosphere by radionuclides. In addition to his research activities, Dr. Laverov has held a variety of prominent positions in scientific administration and government, including chief of the Scientific Research Organizations Administration, of the USSR Ministry of Geology (1972-1983), pro-rector of the Academy of the National Economy (1983-1987), president of the Kyrgyzstan Academy of Sciences (1987-1989), and USSR deputy prime minister and chairman of the USSR State Committee for Science and Technology (1989-1991). In 1989, Dr. Laverov was elected vice president of the USSR Academy of Sciences, a post to which he was subsequently re-elected in the RAS. In 1992, he was named co-chair of the Earth Science Joint Working Group, which is under the auspices of the U.S.-Russian Space Agreement. He is also a member of the Council on Science and Technology under the President of the Russian

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158 INTERNATIONALIZATION OF THE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE Federation. Dr. Laverov graduated from the M.I. Kalinin Nonferrous Metals and Gold Institute in Moscow in 1954 and earned a doctorate in geological-mineralogical sciences in 1958. A full member (academician) of the RAS since 1987, he has authored or co-authored more than 250 publications including 20 books and has served as editor-in-chief of the journal Geology of Ore Deposits since 1989. Valery S. Bezzubtsev heads the Department on Safety and Security Regulations at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities at Rostekhnadzor, the nuclear regulator in the Russian Federation. Dr. Bezzubtsev coordinates regulation and inspection at nuclear energy installations including naval stations, research reactors, and nuclear fuel cycle enterprises. A 1976 graduate of the Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Department of Power Machines and Installation, he worked from 1976 through 1999 at the Scientific Research and Design Institute of Power Engineering, being involved in the development of new types of nuclear power plants. From 1999 through 2003, he served as deputy head and subsequently head of the Department for Atomic Energy at the Russian Ministry for Atomic Energy. In 2004, he was appointed as deputy head of Gosatomnadzor (GAN) before assuming his present position later that year. Alexander V. Bychkov is director general of the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad. After graduating from Moscow State University with a degree in chemistry, he began his career at RIAR in 1982 as an engineer and researcher. He subsequently served as head of the Laboratory of Fuel Technology, head of the Fuel Cycle Department, director of the Chemical Technological Division, and deputy general director before being appointed to his current position earlier in 2006. Dr. Bychkov received his PhD from RIAR in 1998 and is a leading specialist in the field of non-aqueous methods of fuel reprocessing and a leading developer of pyroelectrochemical technologies for fast reactor oxide fuel reprocessing and production. He hold three Russian and four USSR Patents and represents Rosatom in negotiations on issues pertaining to the nuclear fuel cycle, disposal of nuclear materials, nuclear fuel reprocessing and production technologies, and investigations of nuclear fuel and new technologies. Valentin B. Ivanov, graduated from the Samara Technical University with a degree in electrical engineering and received his doctorate of technical sciences from Kuybyshev Polytechnic Institute. His sphere of professional interests includes the nuclear fuel cycle and spent nuclear fuel management. From 1963 to 1998, he worked at RIAR, for the last nine of those years serving as its director general. From 1998 to 2002, he served as First Deputy Minister for Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation. In 2003, he was elected to the Russian State Duma, where he served as a member of the parliamentary Committee on Energy, Transport, and Communication until 2008. From 2002 to the present, he has also been employed at the RAS Institute of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry. Boris F. Myasoedov is deputy secretary general for science of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), head of laboratories at both the RAS Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry and the RAS Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry. His scientific activity covers such fields as the fundamental chemistry of actinides, fuel reprocessing, partitioning of radioactive waste, and environmental protection. He has authored more than 500 publications and serves as editor of the journals Problems of Analytical Chemistry and

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 159 Radiochemistry. Academician Myasoedov graduated from D.I. Mendeleev Chemical- Technology Institute in Moscow in 1954, and earned a PhD in radiochemistry from the Vernadsky Institute in 1965 and his full doctorate in 1975 from the same institute. He was elected to the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1994 and has been awarded two State Prizes for his research on the chemistry of transplutonium elements (1986 and 2001), the Khlopin Prize for his studies of the chemistry of protactinium (1974), and the Ipatiev Prize of the RAS Presidium in 2003. Vladislav A. Petrov is head of the Division of Structural Petrophysics, Laboratory of Radiogeology and Radiogeoecology, of the RAS Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry. In 1984, he graduated as a mining engineer- geologist from the Moscow Geology Prospecting Institute, and he received his PhD in geology and mineralogy in 1994. For more than 20 years he has conducted field research in Russia’s Krasnokamensk District, Chelyabinsk Region, and Krasnoyarsk Region on the geology of uranium deposits, radionuclide migration, site selection, and characterization of potential radioactive waste disposal sites. Dr. Petrov has made technical visits to waste disposal sites in Germany, Switzerland, France, and the United States and has authored and co-authored more than 150 articles and reports in the field of uranium geology and geological disposal of radioactive waste. Mikhail I. Solonin is scientific director of the Technology and Innovation Center of the TVEL Corporation, which manufactures nuclear fuel. Previously, Dr. Solonin was First Deputy Minister for Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation, and director of the Bochvar State Research Center’s All-Russian Scientific & Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials. His professional interests are in physical chemistry and materials science, reactor materials, technology and design of fuel rods for nuclear power plants. In 1997, he was elected associate member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS corresponding member). Dr. Solonin has served as chairman of the Scientific & Technical Council (Ministry of Atomic Energy, Minatom) and as a member of Minatom Scientific & Technical Council, as a leader of the Unique Nuclear Technologies Research and Development Program, as a member of the scientific council with the Federal Science & Technology Program “Environmentally Clean Power Generation,” as head of the chair on physical problems in materials science at the Moscow Physical Engineering Institute. He is a co-author of a two-volume book titled “Dispersive Fuel Rods” and a manual on nuclear reactor fuel rods for universities. Dr. Solonin graduated from the Bauman Moscow Technical University in 1968, and joined the staff of the Bochvar Institute. In 1978, he received his Ph.D. degree and in 1991, D.Sc. degree.

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