Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Kenneth E. Warner (Chair) is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor of Public Health. A faculty member since 1972, he is also director of the university’s Tobacco Research Network. His research has focused on economic and policy aspects of disease prevention and health promotion, with a special emphasis on tobacco and health. He served as the World Bank’s representative to negotiations on the World Health Organization’s first global health treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also served as the senior scientific editor of the 25th anniversary surgeon general’s report on smoking and health. He is on the editorial boards of three journals, chairs the board of Tobacco Control, and was a founding member of the board of directors of the American Legacy Foundation. During 2004-2005 he was president of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and in 1989 was awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion by C. Everett Koop. In 1996, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and in 1999 to its governing council. In 2003, at the World Conference on Tobacco or Health, he received the inaugural award for outstanding research contribution in the international Luther L. Terry Awards for Exemplary Leadership in Tobacco Control. An economist, he has an A.B. from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. from Yale University.


Thomas F. Boat (Vice Chair) is executive associate dean for the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He is immediate past director of the Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and past chairman of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. He also



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Kenneth E. Warner (Chair) is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Profes- sor of Public Health. A faculty member since 1972, he is also director of the university’s Tobacco Research Network. His research has focused on economic and policy aspects of disease prevention and health promotion, with a special emphasis on tobacco and health. He served as the World Bank’s representative to negotiations on the World Health Organization’s first global health treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also served as the senior scientific editor of the 25th anniversary surgeon general’s report on smoking and health. He is on the editorial boards of three journals, chairs the board of Tobacco Control, and was a founding member of the board of directors of the American Legacy Foundation. Dur- ing 2004-2005 he was president of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco and in 1989 was awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion by C. Everett Koop. In 1996, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and in 1999 to its governing council. In 2003, at the World Confer- ence on Tobacco or Health, he received the inaugural award for outstand- ing research contribution in the international Luther L. Terry Awards for Exemplary Leadership in Tobacco Control. An economist, he has an A.B. from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. from Yale University. Thomas F. Boat (Vice Chair) is executive associate dean for the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He is immediate past director of the Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and past chairman of the Univer- sity of Cincinnati College of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. He also 45

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46 PREVENTING MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS was physician-in-chief of Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati. A current focus is creating high-value systems of care at Cincinnati Chil- dren’s and the College of Medicine that are more responsive to the indi- vidual needs of patients and families. A pediatric pulmonologist by training, he worked early in his career to define the pathophysiology of airway dys- function and develop more effective therapies for chronic lung diseases of childhood, such as cystic fibrosis. More recently he has worked at local and national levels to improve research efforts, subspecialty training, and clini- cal care in pediatrics. He has a special interest in issues posed by children’s mental health for pediatric care and training. He is a member of the IOM and serves as cochair of the IOM Forum on the Science of Health Care Quality Improvement and Implementation. He has been a member of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs board of directors since 2004 and is currently board president. He has served as chair of the American Board of Pediatrics and president of the Society for Pediatric Research, as well as the American Pediatric Society. He has an M.D. from the University of Iowa. William R. Beardslee is director of the Baer Prevention Initiatives in the Department of Psychiatry at Children’s Hospital Boston and Gardner Monks professor of child psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is interested in the protective effects of self-understanding in enabling young- sters and adults to cope with adversity and has studied self-understanding in civil rights workers, survivors of cancer, and children of parents with affective disorders. He and his colleagues developed preventive interven- tions designed to enhance resilience and understanding in families with depressed parents and demonstrated long-term positive effects from these approaches. The approach has been implemented in several large-scale projects, including a nationwide program for children of depressed par- ents in Finland and in programs for low-income families. He received the Blanche F. Ittleson Award of the American Psychiatric Association, a Faculty Scholar Award from the William T. Grant Foundation, and, in 1999, received the Irving Philips Award for Prevention and the Catcher in the Rye Award for Advocacy for Children from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. In 2003, he received the Agnes Purcell McGavin Award for Prevention of Mental Disorder in Children from the American Psychiatric Association. He serves on the Carter Center Mental Health Task Force and on the Board of Mental Health America. He is an active member of the IOM Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF) and served on the Committee on Adolescent Health and Development. He currently serves on the IOM Committee on Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Healthy Development of Young Children. He has an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University.

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47 APPENDIX A Carl C. Bell is president and chief executive officer of the Community Men- tal Health Council and Foundation, Inc., in Chicago. He is also the director of public and community psychiatry and a clinical professor of psychiatry and public health at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is principal investigator of Using CHAMP to Prevent Youth HIV Risk in a South Afri- can Township. He is a member and former chairman of the National Medi- cal Association’s section on psychiatry, a fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists, a distinguished life fellow of the American Psychiatric Asso- ciation, and a founding member and past board chairman of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. He has published numerous articles and book chapters on mental health and African Americans. He is editor of Psychiatric Perspectives on Violence: Understanding Causes and Issues in Prevention and Treatment and author of The Sanity of Survival: Reflections of Community Mental Health and Wellness. He was a member of the IOM Committee on the Pathophysiology and Prevention of Adoles- cent and Adult Suicide. He serves on the National Mental Health Advisory Council of the National Institute of Mental Health. He has a B.S from the University of Illinois and an M.D. from Meharry Medical College. Anthony Biglan is a senior scientist at Oregon Research Institute and direc- tor of the Center on Early Adolescence. He has been doing research for the past 25 years on the prevention of adolescent problem behaviors. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and anti- social behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use through both school-based programs and community-wide interventions. He has also experimentally evaluated interventions to prevent adolescent substance use and high-risk sexual behavior, as well as to prevent reading failure and aggressive social behav- ior in children. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published Helping Adolescents at Risk: Prevention of Multiple Problem Behaviors, a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems. He also coauthored the monograph Community-Monitoring Systems: Tracking and Improving the Well-Being of America’s Children and Adolescents and the 1995 book, Changing Cultural Practices: A Contextualist Framework for Intervention Research. He has a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Illinois in Urbana and took postdoctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of Washington. C. Hendricks Brown is distinguished university health professor of epide- miology and biostatistics in the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida. He holds adjunct professor positions in the Depart-

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48 PREVENTING MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS ment of Biostatistics and the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also a senior research scholar at the American Institutes for Research and a collaborat- ing senior scientist at the Oregon Center for Research to Practice. For the past 20 years, he has received support from the National Institute of Men- tal Health and more recently from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop statistical methods for the design and analysis of preventive and early intervention field trials. As director of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, Brown leads a national network of methodologists who are working on the design of preventive field trials and their analysis, particularly with advanced techniques for growth analysis, multilevel modeling, and designs for implementation research. He is the codirector of the multisite Center for Integrating Education and Prevention in Schools, which is now plan- ning a large-scale randomized field trial in Baltimore. He is codirector of the Center for Prevention of Suicide Research at the University of Rochester and coleads randomized trials in youth prevention research. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. Elizabeth Jane Costello is professor of medical psychology in the Depart- ment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and has been a faculty member of the department since 1988. She has served as director for the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is a member of the American College of Epidemiology and has served as council member and chair in the mental health section of the American Public Health Associa- tion. In 2007 she was president of the International Society for Research in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology and a recipient of a distinguished investigator award from the National Alliance for Research on Schizo- phrenia and Depression. Costello’s areas of research interest include devel- opmental epidemiology, life-span developmental psychopathology, mental health services for children and adolescents, and clinical decision making. She has also published numerous works in refereed journals on develop- mental psychology and epidemiology. At the National Research Council (NRC), Costello served on the Panel on Prevention, Treatment and Control of Juvenile Crime. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of London, M.Phil. and B.Sci. degrees from the London School of Economics, and an M.A. from Oxford University. Wendy E. Keenan (Program Associate) provides administrative and research support for BCYF and its various program committees. She also helps organize planning meetings and workshops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families. Ms. Keenan has been on the National

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4 APPENDIX A Academies’ staff for 10 years and worked on studies for both the NRC and the IOM. As senior program assistant, she worked with the NRC’s Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Keenan taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from The Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in liberal studies from Georgetown University. Bridget B. Kelly (Senior Program Associate) first came to the National Academies in September 2007 as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Tech- nology Policy Graduate Fellow. She then joined BCYF as staff for the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults as well as the Committee on Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Healthy Development of Children. She has since also worked as project director for the Workshop on Strength- ening Benefit-Cost Methodology for the Evaluation of Early Childhood Interventions and in IOM’s Board on Gobal Health as study director for the Committee on Preventing the Global Epidemic of Cardiovascular Disease: Meeting the Challenge in Developing Countries. She received an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University and a B.A. from Williams College. Teresa D. LaFromboise is associate professor of counseling psychology in the School of Education and chair of Native American Studies at Stanford University. She is most concerned about stress-related problems of ethnic minority youth. She has developed school- and community-based pre- ventive interventions with adolescents and is a recognized contributor to American Indian mental health initiatives. Her current research investigates the effectiveness of a culturally tailored suicide prevention intervention for American Indian middle school students. In addition to this outcome study, she is exploring the role of cumulative stress, acculturation, cultural iden- tity, depression, and substance use in American Indian adolescent mental health. LaFromboise has received many professional awards for the book American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum, including recogni- tion from the Carter Center for Public Policy, the Department of Health and Human Services as a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Program of Excellence, the First Nations Behavioral Health Association, and the Mental Health/Social Service Program of the Indian Health Service as an Outstanding Contribution to American Indian Mental Health. This intervention has been included in the National Registry of Effective Programs. LaFromboise lectures and teaches courses in counseling psychology, adolescent development, and American Indian mental health and serves on the Board of Family and Children Services in Palo Alto, Cali-

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500 PREVENTING MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS fornia. She has a B.A. from Butler University, an M.Ed. from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Oklahoma. Ricardo F. Muñoz is professor of psychology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), chief psychologist at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH), and director of the Clinical Psychology Training Program there. He directs the UCSF/SFGH Latino Mental Health Research Program, which develops Spanish- and English-language interventions designed to prevent and treat major depression and makes the resulting manuals available for download at http://www.medschool.ucsf.edu/latino/. To expand the reach of this work, he founded the UCSF/SFGH Internet World Health Research Center, which has as its mission developing and testing evidence-based Inter- net interventions for several health problems (such as smoking and depres- sion) in several languages so that participants can use them worldwide (see http://www.health.ucsf.edu). He is coauthor of The Prevention of Depres- sion: Research and Practice (1993) and editor of Depression Prevention: Research Directions (1987). He received the 1994 Lela Rowland Prevention Award from the National Mental Health Association for the San Francisco Depression Prevention Research Project. Muñoz was a member of the IOM committee that produced the report Reducing Risks for Mental Disorders: Frontiers for Preventive Intervention Research. He also served on the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He has an A.B. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon. Mary Ellen O’Connell (Study Director) is a senior program officer in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) of the NRC. She has served as study director for four previous consensus studies: on international education and foreign languages, ethical considerations for research on housing-related health hazards involving children, reduc- ing underage drinking, and assessing and improving children’s health. She also served as study director for the Committee on Standards of Evidence and the Quality of Behavioral and Social Science Research, a DBASSE- wide strategic planning effort; developed standalone workshops on wel- fare reform and children and gun violence; and facilitated meetings of the national coordinating committee of the Key National Indicators Initiative. She came to DBASSE from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), where she spent eight years in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, most recently as director of state and local initiatives. Prior to HHS, she worked at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on homeless policy and program design issues and for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as the director of field services. She has a B.A. (with distinction) from Cornell University and an

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50 APPENDIX A M.A. in the management of human services from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Peter J. Pecora has a joint appointment as the senior director of research ser- vices for Casey Family Programs and professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington. He was a line worker and later a program coordinator in a number of child welfare service agencies. He has worked with the state departments of social services to implement intensive home- based services, child welfare training, and risk assessment systems for child protective services. He has provided training to program leaders and staff in the United States, Australia, Canada, Italy, Great Britain, and Portugal. He has served as an expert witness for the states of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, Washington, and Wisconsin. His coauthored books and articles focus on child welfare program design, administration, and research. He has provided consultation regarding evaluation of child and family services to HHS and a number of foundations, including the Annie E. Casey Foun- dation, the Colorado Trust, the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, the McKnight Foundation, and the Stuart Foundation. In 2002 he was awarded a J. William Fulbright scholarship in Australia. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Bradley S. Peterson is director of child and adolescent psychiatry, direc- tor of MRI research, and Suzanne Crosby Murphy professor in pediatric neuropsychiatry at Columbia University and the New York State Psy- chiatric Institute. His research interests lie primarily in the applications of neuroimaging to the study of brain-behavior associations in normal development and in serious childhood neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism, Tourette syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and affective disorders. He also is actively involved in studying the long-term effects of premature birth on brain development and neurobehavioral outcomes. His imaging studies typically aim to inte- grate anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging data with behavioral, neuropsychological, biological, and symptom measures in large samples of participating children. He has an M.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School. Linda A. Randolph is president and chief executive officer of the Develop- ing Families Center, Inc., an innovative, nonprofit, one-stop service center for childbearing and childrearing families in northeast Washington, DC. She has spent her career working to make things happen at the community level that promote the health and well-being of mothers, children, and families and working to make needed changes in public policy. This has included work in public health at the federal, state, and local government levels and

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502 PREVENTING MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS in academia. She served as clinical professor of community medicine, pedi- atrics, and psychiatry at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and is currently visiting professor at the Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies. She serves on the board of directors of Children’s Futures, a multimillion-dollar city-wide initiative in Trenton, New Jersey, focusing on the healthy growth and development of children from birth to age 3. She is also a member of the national advisory committee to the Kellogg Health Scholars Program. Randolph has served on two previous IOM study com- mittees: the Committee on Nutritional Status during Pregnancy and Lacta- tion and the Committee on Improving the Disability Decision Process of the Social Security Administration. She has a B.S. from Howard University, an M.P.H. from the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.D. from the Howard University College of Medicine. Irwin Sandler is Regent’s Professor of Psychology at Arizona State Uni- versity. He is the principal investigator of the Prevention Research Center for Families in Stress and of the Family Bereavement Program. For over 20 years, he has been involved in the development, evaluation, and dis- semination of programs to promote resilience for children experiencing stressful life situations. His current interests focus on the transition of prevention programs from successful efficacy trials to studies of effective- ness and implementation in community organizations. His research focuses on preventive interventions for children in high-stress situations, including the study of mechanisms of resilience, and the longitudinal evaluation of the effects of preventive interventions for children who have experienced parental divorce and bereavement. He has written extensively on evidence- based prevention and treatment, particularly the development and evalu- ation of prevention programs based on models of resilience in response to serious stressful life events for children. He is coauthor of the Handbook of Children’s Coping and coeditor of The Promotion of Wellness in Children and Adolescents. He has a B.A. from Brooklyn College and a Ph.D. in clini- cal psychology from the University of Rochester.