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Appendix E Committee Member Biographies Michael M. E. Johns, M.D. (Chair), is chancellor at Emory University. Until recently, he was the executive vice president for health affairs of Emory Uni- versity, chief executive officer (CEO) of the Robert W. Woodruff Health Sci- ences Center, chairman of the Board of Emory Healthcare, and professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology (School of Medicine) and Health Policy (Rollins School of Public Health), Emory University. He was in charge of Emory’s affiliations with Grady Memorial Hospital and the Emory Healthcare Hospital Affiliation Program with 60 hospitals in Georgia and surrounding states. Dr. Johns received his bachelor’s degree and graduate studies in biology at Wayne State University in Detroit and an M.D. from the University of Michigan Medical School. He joined the Medical Service Corps of the U.S. Army, serving at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He joined the Department of Otolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Virginia Medical Center before being recruited to Johns Hopkins as professor and chair of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. He served 6 years as dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and vice president for medical affairs at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Johns is internationally recognized for his work as a cancer surgeon of head and neck tumors and for his studies of treatment outcomes. James Bagian, M.D., was chosen as the first director of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS), which was established in 1999. He is also the chief patient safety officer for the VA. NCPS develops, leads, and oversees activities and programs concerned with improving patient safety throughout the VA healthcare system. A National 

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 RESIDENT DUTY HOURS Astronautics and Space Administration (NASA) astronaut for 15 years, Dr. Bagian was a crew member on two Space Shuttle missions, Discovery, March 1989, and Columbia, June 1991. Following the 1986 Challenger space shuttle explosion, he supervised the capsule’s recovery from the ocean floor. He served as an investigator for the Challenger mishap and, in 2003, as the medical consultant-chief flight surgeon for the Columbia Accident In- vestigation Board. Dr. Bagian holds a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Drexel University and a doctorate in medicine from Thomas Jefferson University and is board certified in preventive medicine. Dr. Bagian is on the faculties of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine. Jayanta Bhattacharya, M.D., Ph.D., is an assistant professor of medicine and a Center for Health Policy-Center for Primary Care Outcomes Research core faculty member. His research focuses on the constraints that vulner- able populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations. He has published empirical economics and health services research on medical residents and the impact of their work hours, the elderly, adolescents, HIV/AIDS, and managed care. Most recently, he has researched the regulation of the viatical-settlements market (a secondary life insurance market that often targets HIV patients) and summer-winter differences in nutritional outcomes for low-income American families. He is also working on a project examining the labor market conditions that help determine why some U.S. employers do not provide health insurance. He worked for 3 years as an economist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California, where he also taught health economics as a visiting assistant professor at the University of California-Los Angeles. He received a Ph.D. in economics and an M.D. from Stanford University. Maureen Bisognano, M.S., is the executive vice president and chief oper- ating officer (COO) of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), a position she has held since 1995. Prior to joining IHI, she was senior vice president of the Juran Institute, where she consulted with senior leaders worldwide on strategy and improvement in healthcare settings, and was CEO of the Massachusetts Respiratory Hospital. She has served on the boards of the Massachusetts Hospital Association, the Lean Enterprise Institute, the National Center for Healthcare Leadership, and the American Society for Quality, among others. She currently serves on the board of the Luther Midelfort Clinic and since 2005 has been a member of the Common- wealth Fund’s Commission on a High Performance Health System. She has taught at the Harvard School of Public Health since 1997 and in 2007 was

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 APPENDIX E appointed an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a re- search associate in the Division of Social Medicine and Health Inequalities at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Ms. Bisognano began her career in health care as a staff nurse at Quincy City Hospital, eventually becoming chief operating officer there. She holds a B.S. from the State University of New York and an M.S. from Boston University. Pascale Carayon, Ph.D., is Procter & Gamble Bascom Professor in Total Quality in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the director of the Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she leads the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety. Her research on human factors engineering and patient safety has been funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She is the editor of the recently published Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics in Health Care and Patient Safety. She is the North American editor for Applied Ergonomics and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Patient Safety, Behaviour and In- formation Technology, and Work and Stress. In 2006, she was elected the secretary general of the International Ergonomics Association and a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Dr. Carayon received her engineer diploma from the Ecole Centrale de Paris, France, in 1984 and her Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988. Dr. Carayon is internationally recognized for her research in hu- man factors and systems engineering, in particular in the area of healthcare quality and patient safety. Jordan J. Cohen, M.D., is currently professor of medicine and public health at George Washington University and president emeritus of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). During his 12 years as the presi- dent of the association (1994-2006), Dr. Cohen launched new initiatives in each of the association’s mission areas of education, research, and patient care; expanded and modernized the AAMC’s services for medical students, applicants, residents, and constituents; strengthened the association’s com- munications, advocacy, and data-gathering efforts, and established many initiatives for improving medical education and clinical care. Prior to be- coming president of the AAMC, Dr. Cohen spent 40 years in academic medicine, as dean of the medical school and professor of medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, president of the medical staff at University Hospital, professor and associate chairman of medicine at the University of Chicago-Pritzker School of Medicine, and physician-in-chief and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Michael Reese Hospi- tal and Medical Center. He also held medical faculty positions at Harvard,

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4 RESIDENT DUTY HOURS Brown, and Tufts universities and was president of the medical staff at the New England Medical Center Hospital in Boston. He is a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Medical School and completed his postgraduate training in internal medicine on the Harvard service at the Boston City Hospital. David F. Dinges, Ph.D., is professor and chief of the Division of Sleep and Chronobiology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. His research focuses on physiological, neurobehavioral, and cognitive effects of sleep loss and circadian biology and their relationship to health and safety. He has scientifically developed and validated behavioral, technological, and pharmacological interventions for these effects. During the past 30 years his research has been supported by NIH, NASA, the Department of Defense, Department of Transporta- tion, and Department of Homeland Security. He has advised federal and private regulatory policies regarding duty hours and fatigue management. He currently leads the Neurobehavioral and Psychosocial Factors Team for the NASA-funded National Space Biomedical Research Institute. He is currently a member of the NIH-NINR (National Institute for Nursing Research) Council. He has been president of the Sleep Research Society and the World Federation of Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine Societies, and has served on the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the National Sleep Foundation. He is currently editor-in- chief of the scientific journal SLEEP. He has received numerous awards, including the 2004 Decade of Behavior Research Award from the American Psychological Association and the 2007 NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Javier A. Gonzalez del Rey, M.D., M.Ed., is currently professor of pedi- atrics, associate director Division of Emergency Medicine, and director of Pediatric Residency Training Programs at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Gonzalez del Rey’s major areas of interests include pediatric residency, pediatric emergency medicine education, and international pediatric train- ing. He has won numerous teaching awards including the Cincinnati Chil- dren’s Hospital Medical Center Faculty Teaching Award, the University of Cincinnati Department of Emergency Medicine Golden Apple Award, and most recently, the Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award from the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). He received his university and medical school education at the National Uni- versity Pedro Henriquez Urena in the Dominican Republic, completed his pediatric residency at the University of Connecticut Primary Care Program, and did his fellowship training in general academic pediatrics and pediatric

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 APPENDIX E emergency medicine at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. He is currently certified in pediatrics and pediatric emergency medicine (PEM). He has completed a master’s of medical education. He is currently a member of the National PEM Fellows Conference, the chair of the Ameri- can Academy of Pediatrics PREP-EM course, and the organizer of many international educational exchange programs. Peter J. Kolesar, Ph.D., is professor emeritus at Columbia University and research director of Columbia’s Deming Center for Quality, Productivity and Competitiveness. He holds degrees in physics and mathematics from Queens College (City University of New York) and a Ph.D. in industrial en- gineering and operations research from Columbia University. He has been on the faculties of the Imperial College of Science & Technology (London), the Université de Montréal, and the City University of New York and on the technical staffs of the RAND Corporation and Bell Labs. Professor Kolesar held joint appointments with Columbia’s Graduate School of Busi- ness and School of Engineering and Applied Science, teaching courses in optimization, statistics, quality, and production management. Dr. Kolesar’s research and teaching have also focused on the effective implementation of process improvement methodology, including extensive applications in many manufacturing industries and a wide variety of services. Dr. Kolesar has twice been an examiner for the Malcolm Baldrige U.S. National Quality Award and has been a member of the Council of the Operations Research Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science and was a member of the boards of the Juran Institute and the Montana Fly Company. Brian W. Lindberg, M.B.A., has served as the executive director of the Con- sumer Coalition for Quality Health Care since 1993. The coalition advo- cates for programs and policies that address the critical need for a healthcare system that provides meaningful choices and information, consumer partici- pation, grievance and appeals rights, consumer advocacy, and independent quality oversight and improvement. Mr. Lindberg served on the Planning Committee for the National Quality Forum (appointed by Vice President Gore), and currently serves as the chair of its Consumer Council. He has also served on its Board of Directors. He represents consumer viewpoints on various panels, including the consumer advisory panels of the Joint Com- mission and the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Mr. Lindberg also provides public policy consultation for the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA), the National Association of State Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs (NASOP), Experience Wave, and other organizations. Mr. Lindberg worked

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 RESIDENT DUTY HOURS in Congress for 10 years on the House Select Committee on Aging and the Senate Special Committee on Aging. He holds a bachelor of social work degree from Temple University and a master’s degree in management of human services from Brandeis University, and has studied social and health- care policy at the University of Stockholm’s International Graduate School. Kenneth M. Ludmerer, M.D., is professor of medicine and a professor of history at Washington University in St. Louis where he has won awards for his outstanding bedside teaching and practice of internal medicine. Dr. Ludmerer received an A.B. from Harvard College and an M.A. and M.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. After medical school he did a residency in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and graduate work in history at Harvard. Other positions held by Dr. Ludmerer include American College of Physicians teaching and research scholar 1980-1983; Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation faculty scholar in general internal medicine 1981-1986; Kaiser Family Foundation research grants 1986-1992; Macy Foundation research grant 1989-1994; and Spencer Foundation re- search grant 1992-1995. Dr. Ludmerer is also present or past member of many editorial boards including History of Education Quarterly, Pharos, Annals of Internal Medicine, Academic Medicine, and American Journal of Medicine. He is best known for his work in medical education and health- care policy, authoring books about the creation and evolution of American medical education (Learning to Heal and Time to Heal). He received the Abraham Flexner Award for Distinguished Service to Medical Education from the Association of American Medical Colleges for this work. Daniel Munoz, M.D., is a fellow in the Division of Cardiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he will return as chief resident in medicine in 2009-2010. He obtained his medical degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (class of 2005) and also has a master’s in public administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government where he concentrated on health economics and public policy. He has a bachelor of arts in economics from Princeton University where he graduated with honors. He spent the summers of 1999 and 2001 working in the U.S. Senate in the Health Policy Office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy in Washington, DC. He is a regular columnist for Hopkins Medicine Magazine and a frequent contributor to the Baltimore Sun. Christopher S. Parshuram, M.D., graduated from Otago University of New Zealand, with prizes in medicine and pharmacology. After a residency in pe- diatrics at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, he moved to Canada where he completed specialist fellowship training in pediatric

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 APPENDIX E critical care medicine and clinical pharmacology in Toronto and Edmonton. He completed his Ph.D. in clinical epidemiology in 2005, on the subject of patient safety. Dr. Parshuram was appointed as a staff physician in the Department of Critical Care Medicine in the Hospital for Sick Children in 2003, and is a scientist in child health evaluation sciences in the Research Institute. In addition to formal training in systems of healthcare delivery, Dr. Parshuram has expertise in cardiac arrest prevention, reducing errors that are associated with medications, and preventing fatigue in healthcare workers. He has received peer-reviewed research funding from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, the Society of Critical Care Medicine, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. He is a career scientist of the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, the director of the Centre for Safety Research, and an assistant professor at the University of Toronto in the Faculty of Medicine. Ann E. Rogers, Ph.D., R.N., is an associate professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and holds a joint appointment at the Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Uni- versity of Iowa College of Nursing, a master’s degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and a doctorate from Northwestern University. She is one of six nurses in the United States who have been recognized (or have earned a certificate) as a diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine. Dr. Rogers is the principal investigator of a seminal study on the effects of staff nurse fatigue on patient safety. In addition, Dr. Rogers wrote a paper entitled “Work Hour Regulations in Safety-Sensitive Industries” commissioned by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This paper was included in the IOM Committee on the Work Environment for Nurses and Patient Safety report Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses released on November 4, 2004. She is a fellow of both the Ameri- can Academy of Nursing and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Denise M. Rousseau, Ph.D., earned her graduate degrees in psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. She currently chairs master’s programs in healthcare management and medical management and is the faculty director of the Institute for Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the Carnegie Mellon University’s H. John Heinz II School of Public Policy and Management and the Tepper School of Business. She also directs a proj- ect on evidence-based organizational practices and conducts research and consults in a variety of settings. Before joining Carnegie Mellon, she served on the faculties of Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Manage- ment, the University of Michigan’s Department of Psychology and Institute for Social Research, and the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey. She

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 RESIDENT DUTY HOURS has also been a visiting professor at universities in the United Kingdom, Singapore, Thailand, and China. Eduardo Salas, Ph.D., is university trustee chair and Pegasus Professor of Psychology at the University of Central Florida. He also holds an appoint- ment at the Institute for Simulation & Training. Previously, he was a senior research psychologist and head of the Training Technology Development Branch of the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)-Orlando for 15 years. During this period, Dr. Salas served as a principal investigator for numerous R&D programs focusing on teamwork, team training, advanced training technology, decision making under stress, learning methodologies, and performance assessment. His expertise includes helping organizations foster teamwork, design and implement team training strategies, facilitate training effectiveness, manage decision making under stress, develop per- formance measurement tools, and design learning and simulation-based environments. He is currently working on designing tools and techniques to minimize human errors in aviation and medical environments. He has consulted for a variety of manufacturing, pharmaceutical laboratories, in- dustrial, and government organizations. Dr. Salas is a fellow of the Ameri- can Psychological Association (Division’s 14, 19, and 21) and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He was editor (2000-2004) of the Human Factors journal and is currently associate editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology. He received his Ph.D. degree in industrial and organizational psychology from Old Dominion University. Bruce Siegel, M.D., Ph.D., is a research professor and director of the Center for Health Care Quality in the Department of Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. There he oversees the Aligning Forces for Quality Initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Much of his work has sought to understand and improve the quality of health care received by Americans, with a focus on its most vulnerable populations. His work has included developing innova- tion in reducing crowding and improving hospital patient flow, eliminating ethnic and racial disparities in care, and supporting the safety net. Dr. Siegel has previously held the positions of New Jersey commissioner of health, president of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, and president of Tampa General Healthcare. In addition, he served as a direc- tor of the ACGME, as a senior fellow at New School University, and as an adviser to the Institute of Medicine, the World Bank, and other health- related organizations. Dr. Siegel received his A.B. degree from Princeton University, M.D. from Cornell University Medical College, and M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is board certified in preventive medicine.