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Appendix B Leadership Summit Information1 A LEADERSHIP SUMMIT TO EFFECT CHANGE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources and Board on Life Sciences October 3-5, 2006 National Academy of Sciences Building 2100 C Street, NW Washington, D.C. Agenda All plenary sessions will be held in the Auditorium. Breakout sessions will be throughout the building. TUESDAy, OCTOBER , 2006 12:00–2:00 p.m. Summit Registration in the C Street lobby Welcome and introduction 2:00 p.m. • Ralph J. Cicerone, President, National Academy of Sciences • James L. Oblinger, Chancellor, North Carolina State Uniersity (Committee Chair) 1Additional information about the Leadership Summit, including speaker presentations, poster abstracts, and a participant list, is available at . 

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 Appendix B The USDA interest in agriculture education 2:25 p.m. Session Chair: W.R. “Reg” Gomes, Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources, Uniersity of California System; Chair, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources • Gale A. Buchanan, Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics, U.S. Department of Agriculture A call to action: Opening keynotes from the 2:50 p.m. perspectives of industry and academia Session Chair: Susan J. Crockett, Vice President and Senior Technology Officer, Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Inc. (committee member) A Look Ahead • Gary Rodkin, Chief Executie Officer, ConAgra Foods, Inc. University of the Future • Michael V. Martin, President, New Mexico State Uniersity (committee member) [standing in for Peter McPherson, President, National Association of State Uniersities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC)] Undergraduate education: Reflections on the past and 3:50 p.m. future Session Chair: Vernon B. Cardwell, Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor, Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, Uniersity of Minnesota (committee member) • C. Eugene Allen, Distinguished Teaching Professor and Former Dean of the College of Agriculture; Former Vice President for Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics; and Former Proost for Professional Studies, Uniersity of Minnesota

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Appendix B  Introduction to breakout session 1 4:20 p.m. • A. Charles Fischer, Past President and Chief Executie Officer, Dow AgroSciences LLC (committee member) Breakout session 1: Defining the goals of an 4:30 p.m. education in agriculture This breakout session will seek to answer questions such as: What are the goals of an undergraduate education in agriculture? How does it differ from other science degrees? What are we preparing students for? Welcome reception 6:00–7:30 p.m. Poster session in the Upstairs Gallery (2nd floor) and Great Hall Foyer WEDNESDAy, OCTOBER 4, 2006 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast in the Great Hall Overview of program for the day 8:30 a.m. • James L. Oblinger, Chancellor, North Carolina State Uniersity (committee chair) Remarks from U.S. Secretary of Agriculture 8:45 a.m. • The Honorable Mike Johanns, Secretary of Agriculture Panel on the agriculture classroom 9:15 a.m. This panel will include current discussions on teaching and learning. Session Chair: Janet Guyden, Associate Vice President of Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, Grambling State Uniersity (committee member)

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 Appendix B How people learn • M. Suzanne Donovan, Program Director, Strategic Education Research Partnership Institute; Study Director, How People Learn, National Research Council Re-envisioning our classrooms as learning laboratories • Robin Wright, Professor of Genetics, Cell Biology and Deelopment; Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, College of Biological Sciences, Uniersity of Minnesota Moving towards institutional change in teaching and learning • Jose P. Mestre, Professor of Physics and Educational Psychology, Uniersity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The convergence of culture and pedagogy: Implications for teaching and learning in STEM disciplines • Wynetta Y. Lee, Associate Vice President for Academic Planning, Research & Graduate Studies, California State Uniersity, Monterey Bay 10:45 a.m. Break Agriculture education in the context of other 11:05 a.m. disciplines This session will feature speakers from primarily non- agriculture disciplines on the ways that agriculture contributes to research and development in other fields, highlighting the need to work together on reforming undergraduate education for mutual benefit. Session Chair: Michael W. Hamm, C.S. Mott Professor of Sustainable Agriculture, Michigan State Uniersity (committee member)

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Appendix B  Rural Development • John C. Allen, Director, Western Rural Deelopment Center; Professor of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology, Utah State Uniersity [by videoconference] Regulatory Affairs: Two views • Jay Ellenberger, Associate Director, Field and External Affairs Diision, Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S. Enironmental Protection Agency • Sally L. Shaver, Associate Counselor for Agricultural Policy, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Enironmental Protection Agency Medicine • Jay Moskowitz, Associate Vice President for Health Sciences Research; Vice Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, College of Medicine, The Pennsylania State Uniersity Nutrition • Marion Nestle, Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York Uniersity Introduction to breakout sessions 2 and 3 12:30 p.m. • Karen Gayton Swisher, President, Haskell Indian Nations Uniersity (committee member) 12:40 p.m. Box lunches available in the Great Hall Breakout session 2: Overcoming barriers to 1:00 p.m. interdisciplinary (during lunch) For these breakout sessions, participants will stay in their institutional teams and work with other teams to identify barriers to working across disciplines and opportunities to overcome those barriers. 2:30 p.m. Break

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 Appendix B Breakout session 3: Concurrent topics, best practices, 3:00 p.m. and implementation These concurrent sessions will feature presentations on sample programs and best practices to address particular needs and objectives followed by a discussion on the opportunities and challenges to implementing similar objectives at other institutions. • Academic-industry partnerships domestically and abroad through internships and cooperative education o Thomas M. Akins, Executie Director, Diision of Professional Practice, Georgia Institute of Technology • Academic-industry partnerships: UC-Davis Program in Viticulture & Enology o Andrew L. Waterhouse, John E. K­insella Chair in Food, Nutrition and Health and Interim Chair, Department of Viticulture & Enology, Uniersity of California, Dais • Articulation between community colleges and four- year institutions o Jerry Bolton, Dean of Agriculture, K­irkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids, IA • Faculty development: Project Kaleidoscope o Jeanne Narum, Director, Project K­aleidoscope • Globalization of the science classroom o Robert T. Yuan, Professor Emeritus of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics, Uniersity of Maryland, College Park o Vanessa Sitler, senior undergraduate student in business management, Robert H. Smith School of Business, Uniersity of Maryland, College Park • How can we value teaching at tenure time? o Caitilyn Allen, Professor of Plant Pathology, Uniersity of Wisconsin–Madison

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Appendix B  • International experiences outside of the United States o Frank Fear, Senior Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State Uniersity o Paul Roberts, Director of Study Abroad and International Training, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State Uniersity • Partnerships for sustainable development of agriculture: Green Lands, Blue Waters Initiative o Nicholas R. Jordan, Professor of Agroecology, Department of Agronomy & Plant Genetics, Uniersity of Minnesota • Professional Science Masters o Paul D. Tate, Senior Scholar in Residence and Co-director of the Professional Science Master’s Initiatie, Council of Graduate Schools Reporting back on breakout session 2 4:30 p.m. Groups report back on their lunchtime discussion. • Moderator: Susan Singer, Laurence McK­inley Gould Professor of the Natural Sciences, Carleton College (committee member) Introduction to breakout session 4 (Thursday 5:20 p.m. morning) • Levon T. Esters, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education and Studies, Iowa State Uniersity (committee member) 5:30 p.m. Adjourn for the day THURSDAy, OCTOBER 5, 2006 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast in the Great Hall

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 Appendix B Breakout session 4: Identifying action items and 8:30 a.m. next steps These breakout sessions will enable participants to discuss opportunities and responsibilities for implementing change. Participants will divide into common stakeholder groups (e.g., academic administrators, teaching faculty, industry representatives, professional societies). Each group will seek to identify action items, challenges, and needed resources for moving forward with implementation. 10:15 a.m. Break Reporting back on breakout session 4 10:40 a.m. • Moderator: Patricia Verduin, Senior Vice President and Director of Product Quality and Deelopment, ConAgra Foods, Inc. (committee member) Summary and wrap-up 11:30 a.m. Michael V. Martin, President, New Mexico State Uniersity (committee member) James L. Oblinger, Chancellor, North Carolina State Uniersity (committee chair) 12:00 p.m. Adjourn: Thank you for your participation. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) building is located along the National Mall in Washington, D.C., close to the Lincoln Memorial and Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The entrance to the building is at 2100 C Street, NW, between 21st and 22nd Streets. Please be aware that C Street is closed to automobile traffic between 21st Street and 23rd Street (NAS is located across from the State Department). Be prepared to show a photo ID to enter the building. Sponsors for this project: U.S. Department of Agriculture, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, National Science Foundation, Farm Foundation, and American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture

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Appendix B  SPEAkER BIOGRAPHIES2 Thomas M. Akins is the Executive Director of the Division of Professional Practice at Georgia Tech. He oversees the operation of the nation’s largest totally optional cooperative education program as well as the undergraduate professional internship (UPI) program, the Graduate Co-op Program, and the Work Abroad Program. In cooperative education, Tom has made pre- sentations and conducted workshops on the state, regional, national, and international level. He was elected multiple terms to the Faculty Assembly, Academic Senate, and Executive Board (currently the Vice-Chair). Mr. Akins holds memberships in the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the World Association for Cooperative Education, the Coopera- tive Education and Internship Association, and the National Association of Multicultural Engineering Program Advocates. He has served as Secretary- Treasurer, Chair-Elect, and Chairman of the Cooperative Education Division of ASEE. He is a founding member of the national co-op accrediting body, the Accreditation Council for Cooperative Education (currently serving as President). Mr. Akins is the recipient of the 1998 Borman Award for outstand- ing service to the field of Cooperative Education, and the 2003 Clement J. Freund Award from ASEE for outstanding contributions to the aims and ideals of cooperative education. Mr. Akins received his MBA from Georgia State University and his Bachelor of Industrial Engineering degree from Georgia Tech. Caitilyn Allen is Professor of Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin– Madison, where she has taught since 1992. She just completed three years on the university-level tenure committee, serving as its chair in 2005–2006. Professor Allen’s research lab studies mechanisms of virulence in bacte- rial pathogens of plants, and she also has an applied research project to develop disease-resistant tomatoes for Central American farmers. She has taught courses on molecular plant–microbe interactions, plant-associated bacteria, and tropical plant pathology, as well as two biology courses for nonscience majors. She received UW–Madison’s Distinguished Teaching Award and the American Phytopathological Society’s National Award for Excellence in Teaching. Professor Allen was the founding Director of UW’s Women in Science and Engineering Residential Program and also holds an appointment in the Women’s Studies Program. 2Biographies are current as of the time of the Leadership Summit.

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0 Appendix B C. Eugene Allen is a Distinguished Teaching Professor and Former Dean, Vice President, and Provost of the University of Minnesota. In a distinguished career, he taught more than 3,000 students in his undergraduate and gradu- ate courses, had an internationally recognized research program on the growth of muscle and adipose tissue and their use as meat, and extended these results through his outreach efforts. This resulted in about a hundred scientific publications and more than 40 outreach publications. He has been an invited speaker for hundreds of audiences in different states and countries, has served on numerous program or award review teams, boards of directors, and he has diverse work experiences in 22 countries that are primarily in the developing world. Gene is the recipient of three University of Minnesota teaching awards, two national awards for his research, numer- ous state and national awards for service, and is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Institute of Food Technology. Since 1984, he has provided visionary leadership in roles such as dean (1984–1988), director of the agricultural experiment station (1988–1997), vice president (1988–1995), provost (1995–1997), and most recently as associate vice president for international programs (1998–2006). He has frequently given leadership to national and international initiatives or organizations. The most recent examples include national initiatives to internationalize campuses and expand study abroad enrollments. In the 1980s, Gene and three colleagues took the initiative that led to formation of the National Academies’ Board on Agriculture (BOA). Later he served for six years on the BOA Board of Directors, plus five National Research Council committees (including the steering committee for the 1992 Agriculture and the Undergraduate effort), and he has been an invited speaker for three NAS workshops. In 1989, he was honored as a “Distinguished Centen- nial Alumni” of the University of Idaho. Dr. Allen is a native of Idaho and received a B.S. degree from the University of Idaho (1961), and M.S. (1963) and Ph.D. (1965) degrees from the University of Wisconsin. John C. Allen is the Director of the Western Rural Development Center (WRDC) and Professor in the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at Utah State University in Logan. Dr. Allen grew up on a ranch in eastern Oregon. Since that time, he has worked as a farmer and rancher, journalist, market researcher, and professor. Before accepting the position of WRDC Director, he was Director of the Center for Applied Rural Innovation at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Dr. Allen’s professional activities focus on rural community development, entrepreneurial communi- ties, and natural resource management throughout the West. His research

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Appendix B  interests include the impact of information age technology on economic development, how communities respond to change, the impact of sustain- able agriculture on rural communities, and the role natural resources play in rural development. His research has been adapted to cooperative exten- sion educational programs including Naigating the Net, Master Naigator, Working More Effectiely in Rural Communities, Community Conflict Man- agement, the EDGE (Enhancing Deeloping and Growing Entrepreneurs), Nebraska Annual Rural Poll, Tilling the Soil of Opportunity, and Asset Based Community Deelopment. Dr. Allen received his Ph.D. in sociology from Washington State University, Pullman, M.S. in urban sociology from Portland State University, and B.S. in sociology from Southern Oregon State University. Jerry Bolton is the dean of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Kirkwood Community College’s agriculture department has an enrollment of nearly 800 students in 15 different programs with 25 full-time instructors and a 500-acre teaching lab and con- tributes to the second highest national ranking in conferring two-year associate agriculture degrees. He has implemented increased math and science skills into agriculture curriculums, worked for increased articulation agreements with university agriculture programs, and successfully procured grants from local, state, and national entities, with the largest being a seven-year $6 mil- lion grant from the National Science Foundation for the development of an advanced technology curriculum for agriculture focusing on associate degree colleges. Prior to his position at Kirkwood, he was chair of the department of agriculture and natural resources at Hawkeye Community College in Water- loo, Iowa; a grain elevator, feed, and fertilizer business manager; and a high school vocation agricultural teacher. Mr. Bolton received his M.S. and B.S. from Iowa State University. Gale A. Buchanan is the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Eco- nomics at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Before joining USDA, from March 1995 until his May 2006 confirmation for this position by the U.S. Senate, Dr. Buchanan served as Dean and Director of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at the University of Georgia. He was Interim Director of the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations from 1994 to 1995. Previously he had served as their Associate Director as well as the Resident Director of the Coastal Plain Experiment Station—all affili- ated with the University of Georgia—from 1986 to 1994. He was the Dean and Director of the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station at Auburn

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 Appendix B including working with the units on strategic planning and organization development efforts; and is point person for the College’s global programs. He established his academic credentials in the fields of community and organization development. He served as chairperson of the Department of Resource Development—an academic department devoted to community and natural resource development. He worked in the Office of the Vice Provost for University Outreach, helping to develop an intellectual founda- tion and strategic plan for MSU’s outreach efforts—an approach that informs the University’s work to this day. Dr. Frank served as acting associate director of MSU Extension, and was the inaugural chairperson of The Liberty Hyde Bailey Scholars Program—a distinctive, college-wide undergraduate pro- gram. The John Templeton Foundation and Phi Kappa Phi have recognized the program for the way it promotes undergraduate student and faculty development through collaborative learning. Dr. Fear is the lead author of the recently published book Coming to Critical Engagement. In 2006, Frank was named a Senior Fellow in Outreach and Engagement at MSU. He has also been involved in organizational consulting and civic affairs, notably as a consultant with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and as president and chief executive officer of the Greater Lansing Food Bank (2004–2006). Dr. Fear received his Ph.D. in sociology from Iowa State University. The Honorable Mike Johanns was sworn in as the 28th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on January 21, 2005. Secretary Johanns’ strong agricultural roots stretch back to his childhood. He was born in Iowa and grew up doing chores on his family’s dairy farm. As the son of a dairy farmer, he developed a deep respect for the land and the people who work it. He still describes himself as “a farmer’s son with an intense passion for agriculture.” That passion has been evident during Johanns’ tenure as Secretary of Agriculture. Days after he took office, he began working with U.S. trading partners to reopen their markets to U.S. beef. Nearly 119 coun- tries had closed their markets after a single finding of a BSE-infected cow in the United States in 2003. Within his first year, Johanns convinced nearly half that number to reopen markets. To improve access to markets, he has traveled the world, participating in World Trade Organization negotiations and promoting the successful passage of the Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agree- ment. To fight obesity he launched the interactive, bilingual MyPyramid. com, a motivational and interactive food guidance system. A companion site for children is also available. To aid producers he has led the effort to provide timely assistance after the devastating hurricane season of 2005.

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Appendix B  He has promoted the use and promise of renewable fuels and he has sup- ported conservation by expanding USDA’s conservation commitment. He has also worked to educate and prepare the country for the potential onset of avian flu. Prior to coming to USDA, Johanns was Nebraska’s 38th governor. During his six years in office, Johanns was a strong advocate for rural com- munities and farmers and ranchers. That’s why, with a new farm bill on the horizon, Johanns went to the country in 2005 to hear firsthand from producers about what was working with current farm policy and what was not. Johanns hosted 21 of 52 farm bill forums held in 48 states. Secretary Johanns is a graduate of St. Mary’s University of Minnesota in Winona. He earned a law degree from Creighton University in Omaha and practiced law in O’Neill and Lincoln, Nebraska. Johanns served on the Lan- caster County Board from 1983 to 1987, and on the Lincoln City Council in 1989–1991. He was elected mayor of Lincoln in 1991. He was reelected in 1995, and successfully ran for governor three years later. Secretary Johanns is married to Stephanie Johanns, a former Lancaster County Commissioner and State Senator. The couple has two children and three grandchildren. Nicholas R. Jordan is a Professor in the Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics at the University of Minnesota, and Director of Graduate Studies for the Sustainable Agricultural Systems Graduate Minor Program. His research interests include ecology of plant invasion, participatory development of integrated weed management methods, and ecology, management, and development of diversified “multifunctional” agricultural landscapes that produce ecological services and agricultural commodities. He is also inter- ested in combining scientific knowledge with other ways of knowing to create an adequate knowledge base for sustainable agriculture. Currently, he is working to help organize and conduct participatory action research with coalitions of social groups in support of market development for the production of diversified and multifunctional agriculture. His teaching responsibilities include courses on agricultural ecology and systems thinking in sustainable agriculture. Dr. Jordan received his Ph.D. in botany and genet- ics from Duke University and his B.S. in biology from Harvard College. Wynetta Y. Lee is the associate vice president for academic planning, research, and graduate studies at California State University–Monterey Bay. She has a successful career as a faculty member and as a leader in higher education. She served as an associate professor of higher education in the Department of Adult and Community College Education at North Carolina

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 Appendix B State University. She is best known for her research on micropopulations, policy/program impact, and student performance. Her research addresses issues such as educational parity, mentoring, college student transfer, stu- dent development, and the disparity effect of policy/practice on institutions of color. Her publications and assessment reports reflect her broad interest in student achievement, educational equity, outcomes-based educational assessment, institutional policy, and the assessment of academic quality. She is a frequent contributor to knowledge through various chapters, mono- graphs, and articles in the higher education literature. She is a member of the Association for the Study of Higher Education and editor of its Assessment & Ealuation literature, the American Educational Research Association, the Postsecondary Preparation Working Group, and the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative. Although she has a well-developed reputation as a researcher, teacher, and leader in higher education, Lee is most proud of those for whom she has been honored to serve as mentor into higher education careers. Michael V. Martin. See committee biographies in Appendix F. Jose P. Mestre is a professor of physics and educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include cognitive studies of problem solving in physics with a focus on the acquisition and use of knowledge by experts and novices. Most recently, his work has involved investigating transfer of learning in science problem-solving, apply- ing research findings to the design of instructional strategies that promote active learning in large physics classes, and developing physics curricula that promote conceptual development through problem-solving. He has served on the National Research Council’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board, and Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning; the College Board’s Sciences Advisory Committee, SAT Committee, and Council on Academic Affairs; the Educational Testing Service’s Visiting Committee, and Graduate Research Examination Technical Advisory Committee; the Ameri- can Association of Physics Teacher’s Research in Physics Education Com- mittee and the editorial board of The Physics Teacher; and the Expert Panel of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology. He has published numerous research and review articles on science learning and teaching, and has co-authored or co-edited 17 books. Jay Moskowitz is Associate Vice President for Health Sciences Research, Vice Dean for Research & Graduate Studies of the College of Medicine at

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Appendix B  Pennsylvania State University. He is also the Chief Scientific Officer of the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Dr. Moskowitz has 27 years of experi- ence at the National Institutes of Health where he started his career as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Pharmacology Research Associate Program, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and went on to serve as Principal Deputy Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Mos- kowitz dedicated his NIH career to developing programs that would serve to facilitate the research careers of emerging basic and physician investiga- tors. He was responsible for developing the Pulmonary Young Investigator Award, Pulmonary Academic Award, numerous trans-NIH career develop- ment K awards, and the Shannon Award. He spent eight years between his appointment at NIH and Penn State at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine as Senior Associate Dean for Science and Technology. Dr. Moskowitz received his Ph.D. from Brown University, and his B.A. from Queens College, City University of New York. Jeanne L. Narum is the founding director of Project Kaleidoscope, an infor- mal national alliance that focuses on building leadership at the institutional and national levels to ensure that American undergraduates have access to robust learning experiences in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Jeanne is also the director of the Independent Colleges Office, which assists its member institutions in being competitive in their search for grants from federal agencies for faculty and curriculum development and institutional renewal. She previously served as director of government and foundation relations at St. Olaf College, director of development at Dick- inson College, and vice president for development and college relations at Augsburg College. She has served on several National Research Council committees on undergraduate education in the sciences. She has received honorary doctorates from the University of Portland, Ripon College, and the University of Redlands. Jeanne received her Bachelor of Music from St. Olaf College. Marion Nestle is the Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutri- tion, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, which she chaired from 1988 to 2003. She has held faculty positions in the Depart- ment of Biology at Brandeis University and at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, where she was Associate Dean for Human Biology Programs. She was the senior nutrition policy advisor in the Department of Health and Human Services and managing editor of the 1988 Surgeon General’s Report on Nutrition and Health. She was a member

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 Appendix B of the FDA Food Advisory Committee and Science Board, the USDA/DHHS 1995 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, and American Cancer Society committees that issue dietary guidelines. She is currently a member of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. She is the author of Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health (2002), which won awards from the Association for American Publishers, James Beard Foundation, and World Hunger Year, and author of Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism (2003), which won NYU’s Griffiths Research Award and was selected as a 2004 Best Book by the San Francisco Chronicle. In 2004, she was named alumna of the year by the University of California School of Public Health, and received the David P. Rall Award for Advocacy in Public Health from the American Public Health Association. In 2005, she was elected as a Fellow of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and received the Health Quality Award from the National Committee for Quality Assurance and the Bridging the Gap Award for Excellence in Sci- ence and Public Policy Writing from the Northern California Public Health Association. Her latest book, What to Eat, was published in May 2006. Dr. Nestle completed a Ph.D. in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley. James L. Oblinger. See committee biographies in Appendix F. H. Paul Roberts is the director of study abroad and international programs at the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State Uni- versity (MSU). He has been involved in international programs at MSU for almost 30 years, having served as Assistant to the Vice Provost and Dean, Acting Associate Dean for International Program, and Director of Study Abroad and International Training for the College of Agriculture and Natu- ral Resources. Under his guidance, the College has developed the largest study abroad program in agriculture in the United States with more than 50 programs in 30 countries. He has personally conducted more than 30 international programs involving more than 500 students. He received the 2005 MSU award for outstanding service to study abroad. Dr. Roberts also teaches courses on “Global Issues in Agriculture and the Environment” on campus. Gary Rodkin is Chief Executive Officer of ConAgra Foods, Inc. Prior to joining the company in 2005, Mr. Rodkin was Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo Beverages and Foods North America, where he led a $10 billion

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Appendix B  organization including such leading brands as Pepsi, Gatorade, Quaker Foods, and Tropicana. He joined PepsiCo in 1998 when PepsiCo acquired Tropicana, where he had served as its president since 1995. From 1979 to 1995, Mr. Rodkin held marketing and general management positions of increasing responsibility at General Mills, participating in the successes of many of its leading brands from Cheerios to Betty Crocker, with his last three years at the company as president, Yoplait-Colombo. Mr. Rodkin earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Rutgers College and a MBA from Harvard Business School. Sally L. Shaver is the Associate Counselor for Agricultural Policy in the Office of Air and Radiation at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Sally Shaver has over 33 years of government experience. She began her career at the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control where she developed and worked on water quality models. Her career with the EPA began in the regional office in Atlanta, Georgia, where she worked in all aspects of the water program and was the lead for permitting in the air program before moving to the Agency for Toxics Substances and Disease Registry at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where she worked with the Superfund program. From there she moved back to the EPA in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, where she was responsible for setting and implementing the national ambient air quality standards for several years before spending eight years in charge of the air toxics program. She has led the U.S. delegation on two international task forces and has been a member of USDA’s Agricultural Air Quality Task Force since its inception. Ms. Shaver has a B.S. in mathematics from Furman University and an M.S. in environmental engineering from Clemson University. Paul D. Tate is a Senior Scholar in Residence at the Council of Graduate Schools. He is a co-director of the Professional Science Master’s Initiative, funded by the Ford Foundation and by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He is also a professor of philosophy at Idaho State University and a former Dean of Graduate Studies at Idaho State University, where he continues to work on a special project to develop a training program in research ethics for graduate students. Dr. Tate studied in India and Sri Lanka on a Fulbright scholarship and taught in Sri Lanka as a Fulbright scholar. In addition to scholarly articles on early Sanskrit literature and on the German philosopher Martin Heidegger, Dr. Tate has published several works of fiction, all set in South Asia. In 1996 he organized a conference in India on ethical and political issues in cross-cultural art—issues he continues to address in his

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0 Appendix B literary work and in his collaborations with visual artists. Dr. Tate is a found- ing member of the ethics committee of the Portneuf Medical Center, and he offers frequent workshops on ethics in medicine, business, engineering, research, and university administration. Dr. Tate received his Ph.D. and M.Phil. in philosophy from Yale University, and his B.A. in philosophy from University of Texas at Austin. Andrew L. Waterhouse is the John E. Kinsella Chair in Food, Nutrition, and Health and a professor of enology at the University of California, Davis. His research focuses on the chemistry of phenolic compounds and addresses two types of effects: the taste of wine and health effects of wine to consum- ers. In both cases, his lab collaborates with others who can help utilize chemical data and assistance to advantage and vice versa. In the area of wine quality, his interest is in the effect of oxidation on wine chemistry and how this oxidation affects important quality parameters of wine, such as taste and color. Dr. Waterhouse has been studying micro-oxygenation and its effect on wine color and tannins, and is currently testing some new theories on wine oxidation chemistry. He also participates in the develop- ment of general analytical methodology of interest in wine analysis, has published a few different methods in this area, and is applying a number of different methods to look at new grape or wine treatments being offered by various companies. Dr. Waterhouse received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Notre Dame. Robin Wright is Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs in the College of Biological Sciences (CBS) and professor of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development at the University of Minnesota. Her lab studies the genetic control of cell structure, using yeast as a model organism. In her previous position at the University of Washington, she taught nonmajors’ biology and introductory and advanced cell biology. Wright spends considerable effort on activities that promote innovation and improvement of undergraduate education. Her teaching effectiveness was recognized by a University of Washington Distinguished Teaching Award in 2000. At the University of Minnesota, she chairs the CBS Curriculum Task Force as well as the uni- versity’s Council on Enhancing Student Learning. In addition to teaching freshman seminars, an honors colloquium, and introductory biology, she also helped to develop and co-teaches an orientation/enrichment course required for all incoming freshmen in the college.

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Appendix B  Robert T. Yuan is a part-time senior staff officer at the Board on Life Sciences at the National Research Council and is a professor emeritus in Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics at the University of Maryland, College Park. During his 19 years at the University of Maryland, he was a co-Principal Inves- tigator of the East Asia Science and Technology Project which introduced East Asian themes into undergraduate science and engineering courses. He created three honors seminars and one senior-level microbial physiology course and worked with faculty teams to create an honors seminar and completely restructure the required general microbiology course. Dr. Yuan was a founder of a biotechnology company that focused on drug discovery, and he established a biotechnology consulting group that provided services to foreign governments, private companies, and financial organizations. He was also a U.S. Foreign Service officer that carried out an assessment of biotechnology in Western Europe while he was based at the U.S. Embassy in London. Previous to that he was a section chief at the National Cancer Institute and had done research and taught at Harvard University, Edinburgh University (UK), and Basel University (Switzerland). Dr. Yuan completed his Ph.D. at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

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 Appendix B PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIzATIONS The list below includes the institutional affiliation of those who were registered to participate in the Leadership Summit. Actual participation may vary slightly. • Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges • AgCareers.com • AgrowKnowledge • Alabama A&M University • Arkansas State University • American Agricultural Economics Association • American Society of Agronomy • Auburn University • Biotechnology Institute, The • California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo • California State University, Monterey Bay • Cargill, Inc. • Carleton College • Colorado State University • ConAgra Foods, Inc. • Cornell University • Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics, The • Council of Graduate Schools • Crop Science Society of America • Dow AgroSciences LLC • Farm Foundation • Florida A&M University • Food Systems Leadership Institute • General Mills, Inc. • Georgia Institute of Technology • Grambling State University • Haskell Indian Nations University • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities • Howard Hughes Medical Institute • Illinois State University • Institute of Food Technologists • International Food and Agribusiness Management Association • Interuniversity Consortium for Agricultural and Related Sciences in Europe

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Appendix B  • Iowa State University • Jasper Wyman & Son • Kansas State University • Kirkwood Community College • Michigan State University • Mississippi State University • National Academies, The • National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges • National Science Foundation • New Mexico State University • New York University • North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture • North Carolina A&T State University • North Carolina State University • North Central Regional Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors • Northeastern Regional Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors • Ohio State University, The • Oklahoma State University • Oregon State University • Pennsylvania State University • Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. • Project Kaleidoscope • Purdue University • Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey • Soil Science Society of America • South Dakota State University • Southern Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors • Strategic Education Research Partnership Institute • Texas A&M University • Texas Tech University • University College Dublin, Ireland • University of Arkansas • University of California System • University of California, Davis • University of Connecticut • University of Florida • University of Georgia • University of Idaho

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 Appendix B • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • University of Kentucky • University of Maryland, College Park • University of Minnesota, Twin Cities • University of Missouri–Columbia • University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria • University of Nebraska–Lincoln • University of New Hampshire • University of Puerto Rico • University of Rhode Island • University of Tennessee–Knoxville • University of the District of Columbia • University of Wisconsin–Madison • University of Wyoming • U.S. Department of Agriculture • U.S. Department of Education • U.S. Department of Energy • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency • U.S. House of Representations • Utah State University • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University • Walt Disney World, Epcot Center • West Texas A&M University • West Virginia University • Western Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors • Wilmington College