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Appendix F Committee and Staff Biographies James L. Oblinger (Chair) is Chancellor of North Carolina State University, North Carolina’s flagship university for science, engineering, and technol- ogy. NC State has grown under his leadership, operating on an annual budget of $1.04 billion and a $544 million endowment with nearly 8,000 full-time employees and 32,800 students. Since arriving at NC State in 1986, Chancellor Oblinger has served as associate dean and director of academic programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and provost and executive vice chancellor for Academic Affairs. As Chancellor of NC State, he has worked to make higher education affordable for low-income students and their families through the creation of NC State’s Pack Promise; raised $1.3 billion in additional funding for the creation of new facilities and campus improvements through the Achieve! capital campaign; created international partnerships with a number of edu- cational and exchange opportunities for faculty, students, and business executives; spearheaded innovations in teaching and using new technology to improve learning; supported multidisciplinary programs that meet evolv- ing needs of the 21st century, such as the Golden LEAF Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center, which provides trained workers for the state’s growing biotechnology industry; and advocated for students and their needs, co-editing an e-book, Educating the Net Generation. Under his leadership, NC State’s Centennial Campus was recognized as the 2007 Top Research Science Park by the Association of University Research Parks and continues to be a model for innovative partnerships between government, business, industry, and higher education. Chancellor Oblinger also serves in a number of organizations, including the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, the National Associa- 

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 Appendix F tion of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges Board of Directors, and the American Council on Education Commission on the Advancement of Racial and Ethnic Equity. He also has received several awards for teaching and educational excellence, both as a faculty member and administrator. Dr. Oblinger is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Council for Science and Health, the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology, and the Institute of Food Technologists. He also is a member of Alpha Zeta, Gamma Sigma Delta, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Epsilon Phi, Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Tau Sigma, and Sigma Xi. Chancellor Oblinger received his B.A. from DePauw University in bacteriology and his M.S. and Ph.D. in food technology from Iowa State University. Prior to his arrival at NC State, Dr. Oblinger was associate dean and director of Resident Instruction in the College of Agriculture at the University of Missouri–Columbia, as well as professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Florida. He is an expert in the microbiology of red meats and poultry, decontamination techniques, and food-borne pathogens. John M. Bonner is Executive Vice President of the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST). Before coming to CAST in 2005, he spent 15 years at Land O’Lakes Purina Feed (LOL) LLC, first as beef production manager and then as beef production and marketing manager. He also served as LOL training and marketing manager and eastern sales manager. His efforts at LOL included the introduction of new technical materials and sales support videos, which increased sales in all regions; development and marketing of the “A Steak in the Future” program, which increased LOL beef sales 91%; and the creation and implementation of increased training for sales staff, with an increase in staff members from 20 to 55. Prior to LOL, he worked in the animal health industry in research, training, and market- ing. In 2001, Dr. Bonner was named a Fellow of the American Society of Animal Science. He is a member of several professional societies including the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Iowa Cattlemen’s Asso- ciation. Dr. Bonner received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University with a nutrition physiology major and economics and physiology minors. He has extensive experience in supervising and encouraging staff and coworkers and is proficient in both development and implementation of successful, profitable agricultural programs. Peter J. Bruns is the Vice President for Grants and Special Programs at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). Prior to this appointment,

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Appendix F  Dr. Bruns was a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Cornell University. Dr. Bruns has earned a national reputation for his efforts to improve science education for students at all levels and oversees a national portfolio in undergraduate science education at HHMI. At Cornell, Bruns established a number of innovative science-education programs, including the Cornell Institute for Biology Teachers, which brings New York State high school teachers together each summer for lectures, field trips, hands-on laboratories, and computer training to improve their teaching of molecular biology. He was a member of the NRC committee on design, construction, and renovation of laboratory facilities. Dr. Bruns received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois and his B.S. from Syracuse University. Vernon B. Cardwell is the Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor in the department of agronomy and plant genetics at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Cardwell teaches primarily undergraduate courses in grain and seed technology, crop growth and development, crop management, and biology of food, land and the environment. He also provides leadership in educational programs and is very active in K–16 food, fiber, environment, and natural resources literacy efforts. In addition to his teaching efforts, Dr. Cardwell also serves as advisor for students majoring in Applied Plant Sciences, Ag-Industries and Marketing, and all minors in Agronomy. He is a member of graduate programs in Applied Plant Sciences and Conserva- tion Biology. He currently serves on the AAAS Education Committee, and was recently elected to the National Board of Directors for Food, Land, and People. He recently published an article on “Content Standards for Agriculture or Agriculture Content Imbedded within Core Standards” in Agricultural Education Magazine and “Literacy: What Level for Food, Land, Natural Resources, and Environment?” in the Journal of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Education. Dr. Cardwell received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University. Karen Gayton Comeau is president emerita of Haskell Indian Nations Uni- versity. Prior to this position, she directed Haskell’s teacher-training program and chaired its teacher education department. Dr. Comeau has also taught at Huron College in South Dakota, the University of Utah, and Arizona State University. During her 11-year faculty appointment at Arizona State Univer- sity, she was the Director of the Center for Indian Education and editor of the Journal of American Indian Education. Dr. Comeau has devoted her career to improving educational opportunities for American Indian/Alaska Native students. Her research at the University of Utah has been instrumental in

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 Appendix F the recognition of learning styles as an important element in the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers in schools attended by American Indian and Alaska Native children. Dr. Comeau is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe who was born and raised on the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota. Dr. Comeau received her Ed.D. in educational administration from the University of North Dakota. She holds an M.S. in elementary school administration and a B.S. in elementary education from Northern State University in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Kyle Jane Coulter is a former Deputy Administrator for Science and Education Resources Development in the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In administering higher education programs at CSREES, Dr. Coulter’s col- laborative efforts with key leaders at colleges of agriculture was instrumental in advancing faculty competencies, strengthening curricula and experiential learning, and attracting academically talented and multiculturally diverse students into food and agricultural sciences undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Nationally, her responsibilities included designing and launching innovative programs that resulted in increased support for state and local agricultural education programs. She broke new ground in reach- ing out to engage the full system of U.S. colleges and universities and has been especially successful in partnering with minority-serving institutions. Early on, she challenged Colleges of Agriculture to undertake systemic reform in order to do a better job of producing society-ready graduates by addressing food and natural resource systems in the context of human health and welfare, environmental integrity, global competitiveness, and economic security. In 1993, Dr. Coulter was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree by the University of Arizona for her achievements in fostering change in higher education in the food and agricultural sciences at the national level. In 2001, she received a Presidential Rank Award (Distinguished Executive) from President Bush in 2001 for being a driving force in uniting USDA and the university system in a campaign to recapture excellence in higher edu- cation in the food and agricultural sciences. In 2002, the Future Farmers of America selected Dr. Coulter to receive a special VIP Citation for making significant contributions to agricultural education. Susan J. Crockett is Vice President and Senior Technology Officer, Health and Nutrition at General Mills, where she directs the Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition. General Mills is the sixth largest food company in the world

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Appendix F  and has headquarters in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Since 1999, Crockett has been responsible for health and nutrition strategy and programs for General Mills’ businesses, health, and nutrition regulatory affairs and issues manage- ment, external representation, nutrition science including dietary intake research, and health professional communication. With support of a Bush Foundation Leadership Fellowship, she com- pleted a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota in 1987. She has B.S. and M.S. degrees in nutrition and dietetics, is a registered dietitian, and is a Fellow of the American Dietetic Association. Crockett was Dean of the College for Human Development at Syracuse University from 1990 to 1999 and prior to that was a Department Chair, faculty member, and Extension specialist in nutrition at North Dakota State University. She has published research about nutrition education in schools, effectiveness of nutrition interventions in rural medical clinics and commu- nities. She writes about the influence of environments on the eating behav- ior of children. In 1987, Crockett received an award from the Secretary of Health and Human Services for Innovation in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for her proposal, “Parent Health Education: Maximizing Impact.” Her research has been funded by the Retirement Research Foundation and the National Institutes of Health (NHLBI and NCI) and she has consulted for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Nutrition and Division of Adolescent and School Health. Crockett is president-elect of the Board of Directors of the International Food Information Council, a member of the Food Forum that advises the Food and Drug Administration, is active in the International Life Science Institute, helps lead the Minneapolis United Way’s Early Learning Initiative, and is a Trustee of the United Theological Seminary in New Brighton, Minnesota. Theodore M. Crosbie is the vice president of global plant breeding at Monsanto Company. Dr. Crosbie is a seed scientist by training and holds a Ph.D. from Iowa State University. He was recently appointed to a four-year volunteer position as Chief Technology Officer by Iowa Governor Vilsack to coordinate the execution of a three-part economic development “road map” to enhance Iowa’s biotechnology, advanced manufacturing, and information technology sectors. Crosbie also serves on the executive committee of the Biosciences Alliance of Iowa, a nonprofit organization formed one year ago to implement the recommendations of Battelle’s biosciences report, which was released in March 2004. In 2002, he was named a Distinguished Sci- ence Fellow in recognition of his service and management at Monsanto.

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 Appendix F Levon T. Esters is an Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education and Studies at Iowa State University. He has several years of experience coordinating pre-college career development programs focused on the agricultural sci- ences for urban high school age youth. Dr. Esters is a Wakonse Teaching Fellow and a certified Global Career Development Facilitator. His research interest focuses on the career development of students enrolled in secondary and postsecondary programs of agriculture. In particular, he specializes in the application of social cognitive career theory to diverse youth in urban life science educational contexts. Dr. Esters serves on the editorial board of the Career and Technical Education Research Journal as well as the Editing Managing Board of the Journal of Agricultural Education. He is a member of several professional societies including the American Association of Agricultural Education, the National Career Development Association, and the Society for Vocational Psychology. One of Dr. Esters’ most significant accomplishments includes the development of a survey instrument mea- suring agriscience education self-efficacy which has been used in several studies with students across a variety of cultural contexts (i.e., urban, rural, Korean, New Zealand, and U.S.). Dr. Esters received a Ph.D. in agricultural and extension education from Pennsylvania State University, an M.S. in agricultural education from North Carolina A&T State University, and a B.S. in agricultural business from Florida A&M University. A. Charles Fischer is the former President and Chief Executive Officer of Dow AgroSciences LLC. He also recently retired from the chairmanship of the Dow AgroSciences Members Committee, which is the executive board overseeing policy and investment for Dow AgroSciences. Mr. Fischer has extensive international experience, especially in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Brazil. He was a resident of both Brazil and France during his career at Dow AgroSciences. He served in a leadership role for the Central Indiana Life Sciences Initiative, and also as a board member of the Bio- technology Industry Organization. Fischer was the first person to serve the agriculture industry as president of both CropLife International and CropLife America. He is also past chairman of the National FFA Foundation. Fischer was named 2002 Agribusiness Leader of the Year by the National Agri- Marketing Association, and has been honored by the Mayor of Indianapolis for his leadership in the area of disability awareness. Mr. Fischer grew up on a dairy farm near Cuero, Texas, and earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Texas A&M University.

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Appendix F  Janet A. Guyden is the Associate Vice President of Research and the Dean of Graduate Studies at Grambling State University. Prior to this appoint- ment, Dr. Guyden was the interim dean for the College of Education and a Professor of Educational Leadership at Florida A&M University where she served as coordinator of the educational leadership doctoral program, interim department chair, and the associate chair of the department. Her research interests include the impact of organizations on individual func- tioning with specific interest in Historically Black Colleges, assessment and program evaluation, and teacher education reform. Dr. Guyden received her Ph.D. in educational leadership from Georgia State University, her M.Ed. in counselor education from Worchester State College, and her B.A. in English from Howard University. Michael W. Hamm is the C.S. Mott Professor of Sustainable Agriculture at Michigan State University. Dr. Hamm received an Innovation and Leader- ship Award from the Mid-Atlantic Food and Farm Coalition for his long- standing commitment to the agriculture community and significant con- tributions to food and farming in the Mid-Atlantic region. Dr. Hamm’s research and outreach is focused around community-based food systems and community food security. He also works to identify opportunities for farmers and consumers to link in socially/economically constructive ways. Within community food security his efforts are focused around insuring that all community residents obtain a culturally acceptable, nutritionally adequate diet through a sustainable food system that maximizes community self-reliance and social justice. The C.S. Mott group he heads is focused on three main areas of activity: small- and medium-scale family farm viability; equal access by all members of a community to a healthy diet; and dispers- ing animals in the countryside. He was a past dean of Academic and Student Programs at Cook College at Rutgers University. Dr. Hamm received his Ph.D. in nutrition at the University of Minnesota and his B.A. in biology at Northwestern University. Michael V. Martin is chancellor of Louisiana State University. He previ- ously served as president of New Mexico State University (NMSU) from 2004 to 2008. Before coming to NMSU, he served for six years as vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida, leading the university’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences with more than 3,000 employees statewide. He was elevated to senior vice pres- ident of the University of Florida shortly before being selected as NMSU’s president. Previously, he was vice president for agricultural policy and the

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0 Appendix F dean of the College of Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota. He began his academic career at Oregon State University as a faculty member in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. Dr. Martin completed a bachelor’s degree in business and economics and a master’s degree in economics at Mankato State College (Minnesota State University) in Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. in applied economics from the University of Minnesota in 1977. He has been active in professional and community service organizations, including the Farm Foundation’s Bennett Agricultural Round Table, the National Agricultural Biotechnology Council, and the Florida Agricultural Resource Mobilization Foundation. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the American Agricultural Economics Association, the International Association of Agricultural Economics, the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium, the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society, and the Economic History Association. His areas of specialization are marketing, prices, international trade, public policy, transportation, and business logistics. He continues to be active as a scholar and has written numerous book chapters and articles for academic journals, trade publica - tions, and the popular press. Susan Singer is Laurence McKinley Gould Professor of the Natural Sci- ences at Carleton College, where she has been since 1986. From 2000 to 2003 she directed the Perlman Center for Learning and Teaching, then took a research leave supported by a Mellon new directions fellowship. She chaired the Biology Department from 1995 to 1998 and was a National Science Foundation program officer for developmental mechanisms from 1999 to 2001. In her research, she investigates the evolution, genetics, and development of flowering in legumes; many of her undergraduate students participate in this research. She is actively engaged in efforts to improve undergraduate science education and received the Excellence in Teaching award from the American Society of Plant Biology in 2004. She helped to develop and teaches in Carleton’s Triad Program, a first-term experience that brings students together to explore a thematic question across disci- plinary boundaries. She is a member of the Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) Leadership Initiative national steering committee and has organized PKAL summer institutes and workshops. At the National Research Council, she was a member of the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education and the Steering Committee on Criteria and Benchmarks for Increased Learning from Undergraduate STEM Instruction and chaired the Committee on High School Science Laboratories: Role and Vision; currently she serves on the

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Appendix F  Board on Science Education and is a science consultant to the NRC Science Learning Kindergarten to Eighth Grade study. She has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees, all from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Larry Vanderhoef is the Chancellor of the University of California, Davis. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in 1964 and 1965 from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and a Ph.D. in plant biochemistry at Purdue Uni- versity in 1969. After one postdoctoral year at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he was appointed assistant professor of biology at the University of Illinois. He became professor and head of his department in 1977. In 1980, he became provost at the University of Maryland, College Park. Four years later he was hired as the executive vice chancellor of UC Davis and one-person governing board of the UC Davis Medical Center campus in Sacramento. He also served as acting vice chancellor for academic affairs and acting vice chancellor for research. In 1991, after permanently assuming responsibility for Academic Affairs, Vanderhoef was named executive vice chancellor and provost. On April 6, 1994, the UC Board of Regents named Vanderhoef the fifth chancellor of UC Davis. Chancellor Vanderhoef’s research interests lie in the general area of plant growth and development, and in the evolution of the land-grant uni- versities. He has taught classes at levels from freshman to advanced graduate study. Chancellor Vanderhoef has served on various national commissions addressing graduate and international education, the role of a modern land- grant university, and accrediting issues. Chancellor Vanderhoef has been awarded two honorary doctoral degrees, by Purdue University in May 2000, and by Inje University, Korea, in April 2002. Patricia Verduin is the vice president of global research and development for Colgate Palmolive Company. She was most recently senior vice president and chief scientific officer at at the Grocery Manufactures/Food Products Association. Before that, she was senior vice president and director of product quality and development of ConAgra Foods, where she provided leadership for all research, development, quality, and food safety activities across the organization. Prior to this role, Verduin was a senior member of ConAgra Food Grocery Products’ technical team in Irvine, California. Dr. Verduin has held a number of technical positions at Nabisco, International Home Foods, and Lipton. She holds several patents from her research. In addition, she had leadership responsibility for Nabisco’s plant operation in Fairlawn, New Jersey. Pat received her B.S. degree from the University of

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 Appendix F Delaware in 1980; her M.B.A. in Finance from Farleigh Dickinson University in 1984; and her Ph.D. in Food Science from Rutgers University in 1991. Dr. Verduin is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Food Processor’s Association and sits on the Scientific Affairs Committee for the Grocery Manufacturers of America. She also serves on the Board of Direc- tors of the Alliance for Consumer Education. STAFF Adam P. Fagen is a Senior Program Officer with the Board on Life Sciences of the National Research Council. He came to the National Academies from Harvard University, where he most recently served as Preceptor on Molecular and Cellular Biology. He earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology and education from Harvard, working with physicist Eric Mazur on issues related to undergraduate science courses; his research focused on mecha- nisms for assessing and enhancing introductory science courses in biology and physics to encourage student learning and conceptual understanding, including studies of active learning, classroom demonstrations, and stu- dent understanding of genetics vocabulary. Fagen also received an A.M. in molecular and cellular biology from Harvard, based on laboratory research in molecular evolutionary genetics, and a B.A. from Swarthmore College with a double-major in biology and mathematics. In addition to genetics and molecular biology, he is interested in improving undergraduate and graduate science education and other scientific workforce and policy issues. He served as co-director of the 2000 National Doctoral Program Survey, an online assessment of doctoral programs organized by the National Associa- tion of Graduate-Professional Students, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and completed by over 32,000 students. Since his arrival at the National Academies in 2003, Fagen has served as study director for Bridges to Independence: Fostering the Independence of New Inestigators in Biomedical Research (2005), study co-director for Treating Infectious Diseases in a Microbial World: Report of Two Workshops on Noel Antimicrobial Therapeutics (2006), study co-director for the 00 and 00 Amendments to the National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (2007, 2008), study director and co-editor of Understanding Interentions that Encourage Minorities to Pursue Research Careers: Summary of a Workshop (2007), and study co-director for Inspired by Biology: From Molecules to Materials to Machines (2008). He is currently study director or responsible staff officer for several ongoing projects includ- ing the National Academies Summer Institute on Undergraduate Education

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Appendix F  in Biology, the National Academies Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Advisory Committee, Research at the Intersection of the Physical and Life Sciences, and Laboratory Security and Personnel Reliability Assurance Sys- tems for Laboratories Conducting Research on Biological Select Agents and Toxins. Karen L. Imhof has been an Administrative Assistant with the National Academies’ Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources (BANR) since October 2003. She previously worked with BANR from 1998 to 2001 as a Project Assistant. For the interim years she was a Senior Project Assistant on the National Academies’ Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Before coming to the Academies, she worked as a staff and administrative assistant in diverse organizations, including the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the National Wildlife Federation, and the Three Mile Island nuclear facility and records storage facility. Karen’s personal interests include reading, hiking in the woods, jewelry making, and the pursuit of humor. Robin Schoen is director of the National Academies’ Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources (BANR) of the National Academies, a position she assumed in November 2004. Prior to joining BANR, she was Senior Pro- gram Officer for the Academies’ Board on Life Sciences (BLS), where she directed several studies, including Discoery of Antiirals Against Smallpox; Stem Cells and the Promise of Regeneratie Medicine; The National Plant Genome Initiatie: Objecties for 00-00; Sharing Publication-Related Data and Materials: Responsibilities of Authorship in the Life Sciences; and a BANR study on Predicting Inasions of Nonindigenous Plants and Plant Pests. She also organized multiple years of proposal and progress reviews for the State of Ohio to assist its efforts to build a biotechnology industry within the state. Before joining BLS in 1999, she worked in various capaci- ties over a 10-year period in the Academies’ Office of International Affairs, the National Research Council Executive Office, and the former Commis- sion on Life Sciences. Her work during that time focused on involving U.S. scientists in efforts to strengthen biology internationally, and in addressing policy issues that affect progress in microbiology, neuroscience, biophysics, cancer research, physiology, and biodiversity. This included workshops and reports on gaining access to research resources, intellectual property rights, and developing the infrastructure for science. She also directed a program to bring high-quality laboratory courses in the biomedical sciences to young investigators in Mexico and South America, funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. A native Washingtonian, Robin received a B.S. in biology

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 Appendix F and chemistry from Frostburg State College, Maryland, and an M.A. in Science and Technology Policy from George Washington University. Peggy Tsai is a Program Officer with the National Academies’ Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, which she joined in November 2004. She has worked on various studies ranging from agricultural biotechnology to animal health to international agriculture, and served most recently as the study director for Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing Research at NIOSH (2008). She began her work with the National Academies as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow. Prior to this, she interned with the U.S. House of Representatives, House Science Committee; U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Oceans, Environment, and Scientific Affairs; and U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration. Peggy received an M.A. in science, technology, and public policy from George Washington University, and a B.S. in microbiology and molecular genetics with a double major in political science from the University of California, Los Angeles.