B
Panel Biographical Information

Lester B. Lave, Chair, is the Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Economics and University Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also director, Carnegie Mellon Green Design Initiative, and codirector, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. His teaching and research interests include applied economics, political economy, quantitative risk assessment, safety standards, modeling the effects of global climate change, public policy concerning greenhouse gas emissions, and understanding the issues surrounding the electricity transmission and distribution system. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award of the Society for Risk Analysis. Dr. Lave is a member of the Institute of Medicine.


Maxine L. Savitz, Vice Chair, is a director of the Washington Advisory Group. Dr. Savitz is a former deputy assistant secretary for Conservation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). She received the Outstanding Service Medal from DOE in 1981. Prior to her DOE service, she was program manager for Research Applied to National Needs at the National Science Foundation. Following her government service, Dr. Savitz served in executive positions in the private sector, including: president of Lighting Research Institute, assistant to the vice president for engineering at The Garrett Corporation, and general manager of AlliedSignal Ceramic Components. She recently retired from the position of general manager for Technology Partnerships at Honeywell. Dr. Savitz is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was appointed to the National Science Board in 1998. She is a member of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, the DOE’s Laboratory Operations Board, and advisory bodies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 305
B Panel Biographical information Lester B. Lave, Chair, is the Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Eco- nomics and University Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also direc- tor, Carnegie Mellon Green Design Initiative, and codirector, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. His teaching and research interests include applied economics, political economy, quantitative risk assessment, safety standards, mod- eling the effects of global climate change, public policy concerning greenhouse gas emissions, and understanding the issues surrounding the electricity transmission and distribution system. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award of the Society for Risk Analysis. Dr. Lave is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Maxine L. Savitz, Vice Chair, is a director of the Washington Advisory Group. Dr. Savitz is a former deputy assistant secretary for Conservation, U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE). She received the Outstanding Service Medal from DOE in 1981. Prior to her DOE service, she was program manager for Research Applied to National Needs at the National Science Foundation. Following her govern- ment service, Dr. Savitz served in executive positions in the private sector, includ- ing: president of Lighting Research Institute, assistant to the vice president for engineering at The Garrett Corporation, and general manager of AlliedSignal Ceramic Components. She recently retired from the position of general manager for Technology Partnerships at Honeywell. Dr. Savitz is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was appointed to the National Science Board in 1998. She is a member of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, the DOE’s Laboratory Operations Board, and advisory bodies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 0

OCR for page 305
0 Real Prospects for Energy Efficiency in the United States Dr. Savitz also serves on the board of directors of the Electric Power Research Institute and the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. Dr. Savitz is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). She received a B.A. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. R. Stephen Berry is the James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Chicago and holds appointments in the College, the James Franck Institute, and the Department of Chemistry. He has also held an appointment in the School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago and has worked on a variety of subjects ranging from strictly scientific matters to a variety of topics in policy. He spent 1994 at the Freie Universität Berlin as an awardee of the Humboldt Prize. In 1983 he was awarded a MacArthur Fel- lowship. His experimental research includes studies of negative ions, chemical reactions, detection of transient molecular species, photoionization, and other laser-matter interactions. Other research has involved interweaving thermodynam- ics with economics and resource policy, including efficient use of energy. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Berry has worked on issues of science and the law, and with man- agement of scientific data, activities that have brought him into the arena of elec- tronic media for scientific information and issues of intellectual property in that context. Dr. Berry is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He attended Harvard University, where he received an A.B. and an A.M. in chemistry and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry. Marilyn A. Brown is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Previously, she was the interim director of the Engineering Science and Technology Division at ORNL. During her 22 years at ORNL, Dr. Brown researched the impacts of policies and programs aimed at advancing the market entry of sustainable energy technologies and led several energy technology and policy scenario studies. Prior to serving at ORNL, she was a tenured associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Illinois, Urbana- Champaign, where she conducted research on the diffusion of energy innovations. She has authored more than 150 publications and has been an expert witness in hearings before committees of both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representa- tives. A recent study that she co-led, Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future, was the subject of two Senate hearings, has been cited in proposed federal legislation, and has had a significant role in international climate change debates. She serves

OCR for page 305
Appendix B 0 on the board of directors of several energy, engineering, and environmental orga- nizations, including the Alliance to Save Energy and the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, and she serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Technology Transfer. Dr. Brown is a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy. She has a Ph.D. in geography from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in resource planning from the University of Massachusetts. Linda R. Cohen is a professor of economics and associate dean for research and graduate studies for the School of Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. She is a fellow and former council member of the California Council for Science and Technology, and was a member of the Advisory Panel for the Public Interest Energy Research Program for the California Energy Commission. She recently served on National Research Council (NRC) committees on the benefits of DOE programs in energy efficiency and fossil energy and on the American Physical Society Panel on Public Affairs’ Committee on Energy and Environment. In 2004 Dr. Cohen held the Gilbert White Fellowship at Resources for the Future of Washington, D.C. Her energy-related publications include The Technology Pork Barrel, “When Can Government Subsidize Research Joint Ventures? Poli- tics, Economics and Limits to Technology Policy,” “Is U.S. Science Policy at Risk? Trends in Federal Support for R&D,” and Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward, with coauthors. She received a Ph.D. in social sciences from the California Insti- tute of Technology. Magnus G. Craford is the chief technology officer of Philips LumiLeds Lighting. Dr. Craford began his professional career as a research physicist at Monsanto Chemical Company. His initial research dealt with the development of optoelec- tronics materials and devices using a variety of compound semiconductor materi- als. In 1979, he joined Hewlett Packard Company as a manager in the Optoelec- tronics Division, responsible for the development of technology and processes for manufacturing visible light emitting diodes. In 1999, Dr. Craford assumed his current position as chief technical officer of LumiLeds Lighting, then a joint ven- ture of Agilent Technologies and Philips Lighting, now owned by Philips. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE). He has received the MRS Medal, the IEEE Morris N. Liebmann Award, the Holonyak Award of the Optical of America, the Welker Award of the International Sym- posium on Compound Semiconductors, the Electronics Division Award of the

OCR for page 305
08 Real Prospects for Energy Efficiency in the United States Electrochemical Society, and the Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Illinois College of Engineering. He has published more than 50 papers and book chapters. Dr. Craford is a member of the NAE. He received a B.A. in physics from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois. Paul A. DeCotis is vice president of power markets at Long Island Power Author- ity, where he oversees strategic resource planning; fuel, energy, and capacity pur- chases and sales; power project development and management; and participation in the region’s wholesale power markets. Prior to this he was deputy secretary for energy in New York, serving as senior energy advisor to Governor Spitzer and Governor Paterson. He was also chair of the State Energy Planning Board. Mr. DeCotis previously served as director of energy analysis for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and before that was chief of policy at the State Energy Office in New York. Until his appointment as deputy secretary, he was president of a management consulting business, specializing in executive and board development, strategy, and mediation. Since 1985, he has served as an adjunct faculty member at several colleges and universities, including Cornell Uni- versity, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Sage Graduate School. Mr. DeCotis is a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems of the National Research Council; a member of the Energy Working Group of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors; a member of the Energy Resources Board of the Ameri- can University at Kosovo; an editorial board member of the Energy Efficiency Journal; an executive committee member of the New York Reliability Council; and a member of the New York Smart Grid Consortium. He has served on and chaired many professional organizations and associations and has extensive com- munity service experience. Mr. DeCotis received his B.A. in international business management from the State University College at Brockport, his M.A. in econom- ics from the University at Albany, and his M.B.A. in finance from the Sage Gradu- ate School at Russell Sage College. James H. DeGraffenreidt, Jr., is chairman of the board and chief executive office of the WGL Holdings, Inc., the parent company of Washington Gas. He also serves as chairman and CEO of Washington Gas, the natural gas utility serving more than 980,000 customers in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area and surrounding region. After practicing law as a partner or associate at different law firms and as assistant people’s counsel in Maryland, he joined WGL Holdings, Inc., as senior managing attorney. Mr. DeGraffenreidt also serves on numerous

OCR for page 305
Appendix B 0 boards, including the American Gas Association Alliance to Save Energy, MedStar Health, Harbor Bankshares Corporation, Maryland Science Center, the Walters Art Museum, and the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company. He received a B.A. from Yale College and a J.D. and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. Howard Geller is the executive director of the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP), a public interest venture he founded in 2001. Based in Boulder, Colo- rado, SWEEP promotes policies and programs to advance energy efficiency in a six-state region that includes Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. He is the former executive director of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE). He established ACEEE’s Washington, D.C., office in 1981, stepping down as executive director in February 2001. Dr. Geller has advised and conducted energy efficiency studies for utilities, govern- mental organizations, and international agencies. He has testified before the U.S. Congress on energy issues many times and has influenced key energy legisla- tion, including the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 and the Energy Policy Act of 1992. He is author or coauthor of four books. His most recent book, Energy Revolution: Policies for a Sustainable Future, was published in December 2002 by Island Press. Dr. Geller has spent significant time work- ing on energy efficiency issues in Brazil, where he helped to start and frequently advises Brazil’s National Electricity Conservation Program. He was awarded the 1998 Leo Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest by the American Physi- cal Society in recognition of his contributions to national appliance efficiency standards and more efficient energy use in general. Dr. Geller is a member of the editorial advisory board for the journal Energy Policy and was the associate edi- tor for energy efficiency for the Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy. He received a Ph.D. in energy policy from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Princeton University. David B. Goldstein codirects the energy program of the National Resources Defense Council. He has worked on energy efficiency and policy since the early 1970s. In 2002, the MacArthur Foundation recognized his achievement in the field by awarding him one of its prestigious 5-year fellowships. Dr. Goldstein has worked toward the development of energy efficiency standards for new buildings and appliances at the regional and national levels, both in the United States and in Russia. He negotiated the agreement that led to the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 and has helped design and direct energy efficiency pro-

OCR for page 305
0 Real Prospects for Energy Efficiency in the United States grams with utilities and state regulatory agencies. Dr. Goldstein also created the Location Efficient Mortgage, a program designed to reduce urban sprawl and car use. He was a founding director of the Consortium for Energy Efficiency and the New Buildings Institute. Dr. Goldstein is a fellow of the American Physical Soci- ety and a recipient of its Leo Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. Alexander MacLachlan retired from E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company in 1993 after more than 36 years of service. He had been senior vice president for research and development (R&D) and chief technical officer since 1986. In 1994, he joined the DOE as deputy undersecretary for technology partnerships and in 1995 was made deputy undersecretary for R&D management. He left DOE in 1996 but remained on its Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, Laboratory Operations Board, Sandia President’s Advisory Council, and the National Renewable Energy Labora- tory’s Advisory Council until 2003. He has participated in several studies for the NRC, including Containing the Threat from Illegal Bombings (1998), Technology Commercialization: Russian Challenges, American Lessons (1998), Building an Effective Environmental Management Science Program (1997), and most recently, Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices (2007). He was also chair for the Committee to Review the Department of Transportation’s Intelligent Vehicle Initiative. He served recently on the NRC’s Board on Radioactive Waste Manage- ment. Dr. MacLachlan is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and a member of the NAE. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Tufts University and a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. William F. Powers retired as vice president of research, Ford Motor Company. He has extensive expertise in advanced R&D of automotive technology. His approxi- mately 20 years at Ford included positions as director, Vehicle, Powertrain and Systems Research; director, Product and Manufacturing Systems; program man- ager, Specialty Car Programs; and executive director, Ford Research Laboratory and Information Technology. Prior positions also include professor, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, during which time he consulted with NASA, Northrop, Caterpillar, and Ford; research engineer, University of Texas; and mathematician and aerospace engineer, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. He is a fellow, IEEE; fellow, Society of Automotive Engineers; fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineers; member, NAE; and foreign member, Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. He received a B.S. in aerospace

OCR for page 305
Appendix B  engineering from the University of Florida and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from the University of Texas at Austin. Arthur H. Rosenfeld is a professor of physics at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab- oratory (LBNL). He is also a member of the California Energy Commission. After completing his graduate studies, Dr. Rosenfeld went to the University of California at Berkeley, where he joined, and eventually led, the Nobel Prize–winning particle physics group of Luis Alvarez at LBNL until 1974. At that time, he changed to the new field of efficient use of energy, formed the Center for Building Science at LBNL, and led it until 1994. The center developed electronic ballasts for fluores- cent lamps (which led to compact fluorescent lamps), low-emissivity windows, and the DOE-2 computer program for the energy analysis and design of buildings. He received the Szilard Award for Physics in the Public Interest in 1986 and the Carnot Award for Energy Efficiency from the DOE in 1993. In 2006, Dr. Rosen- feld received the Enrico Fermi Award, the oldest and one of the most prestigious science and technology awards given by the U.S. government. Dr. Rosenfeld is a cofounder of the ACEEE, the University of California’s Institute for Energy Effi- ciency, and the Washington-based Center for Energy and Climate Solutions. From 1994 to 1999 Dr. Rosenfeld served as senior advisor to the DOE’s Assistant Secre- tary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. Daniel Sperling is a professor of civil engineering and environmental science and policy and director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Sperling has done extensive studies on alternative transpor- tation fuels, fuel cell vehicles, and sustainable transportation, and has authored 200-plus technical papers and eight books. He has been a member of several NRC committees related to transportation, including the Committee to Review the R&D Strategy for Biomass-Derived Ethanol and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels, the Committee on Alternative and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use, and the Committee for the Study of the Long-Term Viability of Fuel Taxes for Transportation Finance. He is the chair of the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB’s) Sustainability and Transportation Committee and a former chair of the TRB’s Alternative Transportation Fuels Committee. Dr. Sperling was elected a National Associate of the National Academies in 2004. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in transportation engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.

OCR for page 305