Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

ROBERT W. CORELL (Chair) is the vice president of policy and programs at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment and a senior policy fellow at the American Meteorological Society. He also cochairs an international planning group that is developing a strategy designed to harness science, technology, and innovation for sustainable development; serves as the chair of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment; is a senior science advisor to ManyOne.Net; and is chair of the board of the Digital Universe Foundation. Previously, he was a professor and academic administrator at the University of New Hampshire, served as assistant director for geosciences at the National Science Foundation, and led the U.S. Global Change Research Program from 1987 to 2000. An oceanographer and engineer by training, his research focuses on global and regional climate change, related environmental issues, and science to promote understanding of vulnerability and sustainable development. He holds the National Conservation Award for Science from the National Wildlife Federation and the National Lifetime Achievement Award in Science from the National Council for Science and the Environment. He received Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


KAI N. LEE (Vice Chair) is a program officer in conservation and science at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and Rosenburg professor of environmental studies, emeritus, at Williams College. He previously taught political science and environmental studies at the University of Washington. He has been a visiting professor, lecturer, or research fellow at the Kyoto Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University; Stanford



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff ROBERT W. CORELL (Chair) is the vice president of policy and pro- grams at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment and a senior policy fellow at the American Meteorological Society. He also cochairs an international planning group that is develop- ing a strategy designed to harness science, technology, and innovation for sustainable development; serves as the chair of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment; is a senior science advisor to ManyOne.Net; and is chair of the board of the Digital Universe Foundation. Previously, he was a professor and academic administrator at the University of New Hampshire, served as assistant director for geosciences at the National Science Foundation, and led the U.S. Global Change Research Program from 1987 to 2000. An oceanographer and engineer by training, his research focuses on global and regional climate change, related environmental issues, and science to pro- mote understanding of vulnerability and sustainable development. He holds the National Conservation Award for Science from the National Wildlife Federation and the National Lifetime Achievement Award in Science from the National Council for Science and the Environment. He received Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. KAI N. LEE (Vice Chair) is a program officer in conservation and science at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and Rosenburg professor of environmental studies, emeritus, at Williams College. He previously taught political science and environmental studies at the University of Washington. He has been a visiting professor, lecturer, or research fellow at the Kyoto Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University; Stanford 

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80 InFORmIng DECISIOnS In A ChAngIng ClImAtE University, the University of California at Berkeley; Trent University, the University of Wisconsin; Memorial University of Newfoundland; and an online education program at the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute. His interests include sustainability science, marine ecosystem management, urban sustainability (provision of ecosystem services and effects on human well-being), sustainable development, the role of learning in environmental policy, and governance. He has an A.B. degree in experimental physics from Columbia College and a Ph.D. degree in experimental physics from Princeton University. JOSEPH ARVAI is a professor of judgment and decision making in the De- partment of Community, Agriculture, Recreation, and Resource Studies and the Environmental Science and Policy Program, Michigan State University. He is also an adjunct professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia and a research scientist with Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. His research focuses on environmental problems, mainly in terms of designing and testing deci- sion-aiding approaches for risk and resource management, as well as choice and preference behavior more broadly. He frequently leads workshops to improve the decision-making skills of both resource managers and stake- holders, working across Canada, the United States, and internationally as a consultant to government agencies and nonprofit groups. He has a B.Sc. degree in ecology, an M.Sc. degree in oceanography, and a Ph.D. degree in judgment and decision making from the University of British Columbia. GARRY D. BREWER is Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser professor of resource policy and management at Yale School of Management. Previously at Yale, he held the Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser and Edwin W. Davis chairs in the School of Management and in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He was director of the university’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies. He is a policy scientist who began at the RAND Corporation, where he was a senior staff member of the social science department. He has also held positions at the University of Michigan as a dean and as a professor in the School of Natural Resources and Environment, a professor in the business school, and as the founding director of the Erb Sustainability Institute. Later he was a professor in the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California at Berkeley. He was appointed by His Majesty the King of Sweden to be the King Carl XVI Gustaf professor of environ- mental sciences at the Royal Institute of Technology. He is a member of the Royal Swedish Academy and the World Academy of Art and Science. He has an M.S. degree from San Diego State University and a Ph.D. degree from Yale University.

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8 APPEnDIX B JENNIFER F. BREWER (Program Officer) was a staff member at the National Research Council, working with the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. She is now an assistant scientist in the Insti- tute for Coastal Science and Policy and an assistant professor in the Depart- ment of Geography, both at East Carolina University. Her recent research investigates models of environmental governance in fisheries management, including common property, market-based, and spatial approaches. She has worked with governments, nongovernmental organizations, and private industry in marine policy and international voluntary service. She was a John A. Knauss Sea Grant fellow of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the U.S. House of Representatives. She holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan, an M.S. degree in marine policy from the University of Maine, and a Ph.D. degree in human geography from Clark University. CHARLES (CHIP) G. GROAT is interim dean at the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he held sev- eral positions at the University of Texas at El Paso, including associate vice president for research and sponsor projects, director of the Center for Environmental Resource Management, director of the Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, and a professor of geological sci- ences. He has worked directly for many years in geological studies, energy and minerals resource assessment, groundwater occurrence and protection, geomorphic processes and landform evolution in desert areas, and coastal studies. He previously served as director of the U.S. Geological Survey of the U.S. Department of the Interior, executive director at the Center for Coastal, Energy, and Environmental Resources at Louisiana State Univer- sity, executive director for the American Geological Institute, and assistant to the secretary of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, where he administered the Coastal Zone Management Program and the Coastal Protection Program. He has a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Texas at Austin. MARTHA KREBS is deputy director for research and development at the Public Interest Energy Research Program of the California Energy Com- mission. The division is responsible for the Public Interest Energy Research Program, which conducts research to develop environmentally sound, reli- able, and affordable electricity and natural gas services and products. Pre- viously, she was president of Science Strategies, an analysis and consulting firm that works with public and private organizations to identify critical issues and opportunities in science and technology. Before establishing Science Strategies, she was an associate vice chancellor for research at the University of California at Los Angeles and founding director of the

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8 InFORmIng DECISIOnS In A ChAngIng ClImAtE California NanoSystems Institute. Earlier, she was a senior fellow at the Institute for Defense Analysis, where she led studies in R&D management, planning, and budgeting. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association of Women in Science. She is also a trustee of the Institute for Defense Analyses. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the Catholic University of America. ROBERT LEMPERT is a senior scientist at the RAND Corporation and a professor at and director of RAND’s Frederick S. Pardee Center for Lon- ger Range Global Policy and the Future Human Condition. His research focuses on decision making under uncertainty, with an emphasis on climate change, energy, and the environment. Currently, he is working with a num- ber of natural resource agencies in their efforts to include climate change in their long-range plans. He is a coauthor of Shaping the next One hundred Years: new methods for Quantitatie, longer-term Policy Analysis. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He holds a B.A.S. degree in physics and political sci- ence from Stanford University and a Ph.D. degree in physics from Harvard University. MACK McFARLAND is a principal scientist of environmental programs at DuPont Fluoroproducts, with primary responsibilities for coordination of research programs and assessment and interpretation of scientific informa- tion on stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change. During mid-1990s he was on loan for 2 years to the Atmosphere Unit of the United Nations Environment Programme and for 1 year to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group II Technical Support Unit. At DuPont, he has received a C&P Flagship Award, an Environmental Respect Award, and an Environmental Excellence Award, and he is also a recipi- ent of an individual Climate Protection Award by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for his contributions in providing understandable and reliable information to decision makers. He received a B.S. degree in chem- istry from the University of Texas at Austin and a Ph.D. degree in chemical physics from the University of Colorado. SUSANNE C. MOSER is director and principal researcher of Susanne Moser Research and Consulting and associate researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Institute of Marine Sciences. Previously, she was a research scientist at the Institute for the Study of Society and Environment at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. She has also served as staff scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a visiting assistant professor at Clark University, and a fellow in the Global

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8 APPEnDIX B Environmental Assessment Project at Harvard University. Her research interests include the impacts of global environmental change, especially in the coastal, public health, and forest sectors; societal responses to envi- ronmental hazards in the face of uncertainty; the use of science to support policy and decision making; and the effective communication of climate change to facilitate social change. Her current work focuses on developing adaptation strategies to climate change at local and state levels, identifying ways to promote community resilience, and building decision support sys- tems. She is a fellow of the Aldo Leopold and Donella Meadows Leadership Programs. She received a diploma in applied physical geography from the University of Trier in Germany and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Clark University. JONATHAN A. PATZ is professor of environmental studies and pop- ulation health sciences at the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment. He also holds appointments with the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the Department of Population Health Sciences, all at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he is an affiliated scientist with the National Center on Atmospheric Research. Formerly, he directed the Program on Health Effects of Global Environmental Health Sciences at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. His re- search activities are focused on the effects of climate change on heat waves, air pollution and water- and vector-borne diseases, and the link between deforestation and resurgent diseases in the Amazon. He was cochair for the U.S. National Assessment on Climate Variability and Change Health Sec- tor Expert Panel and convening lead author for the United Nations/World Bank Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He has an M.D. degree from Case Western University and a M.P.H. degree from Johns Hopkins University. CYNTHIA E. ROSENZWEIG is a senior research scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies, where she is the leader of the Climate Impacts Group. The mission of the group is to investigate the interactions of climate with systems and sectors important to ecological and human well-being. She is currently cochairing the New York City Panel on Climate Change. She also holds adjunct ap- pointments as a senior research scientist at the Columbia University Earth Institute and at Barnard College. Her research focuses on the impacts of environmental change, including increasing carbon dioxide, global warm- ing, and El Niño, on regional, national, and global scales. She received an M.S. degree in soils and crops from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. degree in plant, soil, and environmental sciences from the University of Massachusetts.

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8 InFORmIng DECISIOnS In A ChAngIng ClImAtE HARVEY RUVIN is the elected county clerk for Miami-Dade County, with responsibility for 1,400 employees and a $65 million budget. In a long career in public service, he has been mayor of the City of North Bay Vil- lage and served five consecutive 4-year terms on the Metro Dade County Commission. As president of the National Association of Counties, he has chaired task forces on immigration, environment and energy, and liability insurance. He is a past chair and current member of the Urban Consortium of Public Technology, the technology arm of the National League of Cities; the National Association of Counties; and the International City/County Management Association. His main interest is in seeking to apply emerging technologies to local government needs. In 1990 he helped form the Inter- national Council for Local Environmental Initiatives, which started the Cit- ies for Climate Protection initiative and has reduced greenhouse gases in 14 communities around the world. He was recently appointed cochair of the 25-member Miami–Dade County Climate Change Adaptation Task Force, which has committees focused on science, intergovernmental affairs, natural systems adaptation, built environment/property/infrastructure, greenhouse gas reduction, and economic/social/health. He has also served on advisory panels to Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton covering such topics as energy and sustainability. He holds an engineering degree from the University of Florida and a J.D. degree from the University of Miami. SOROOSH SOROOSHIAN is distinguished professor of civil and envi- ronmental engineering and of earth system science at the University of California at Irvine. His research focuses on surface hydrology, primarily in the area of rainfall-runoff modeling. He has devoted much of his work to model identification and calibration issues and has developed special estimation criteria to account for the uncertainties of calibration data. Other research interests include the application of remote sensing data for characterization of hydrologic parameters and fluxes and the implication of climate variability and change in water resources. He also consults on prob- lems related to surface hydrology and flood forecasting. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, an M.S. degree in operations research, and a Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. PAUL C. STERN (Study Director) is a senior program officer at the Na- tional Research Council and director of its standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level; participatory processes for informing environmental deci- sion making; and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He

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8 APPEnDIX B is coauthor of the textbook Enironmental Problems and human Beha- ior (2nd ed., 2002) and coeditor of numerous National Research Council publications. He coauthored (with Paul Dietz and Elinor Ostrom) the 2003 Science article “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” which won the 2005 Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He holds a B.A. degree from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, all in psychology. RICHARD THOMAS is the senior vice president and chief underwriting of- ficer for the Commercial Insurance Group of American International Group (AIG). He has held a number of positions at AIG, including president of its Risk Management’s Industry Specialties Group and overseer of its planning and implementation of Y2K strategies for casualty underwriting worldwide. Previously, he worked with Aetna Life & Casualty, The Hartford Group, INA/CIGNA, and Reliance Insurance Companies. He serves on the M-200, an association of risk managers of multinational corporations, and on the Board of the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute, which he has also chaired. He also serves on advisory boards for the Risk Management and Decision Processes Center of the Wharton School at the University of Penn- sylvania, the Center for Terrorism Risk Management Policy of the RAND Corporation, and the College of Mathematics and Physical Sciences at the University of Maryland. He has advised the U.S. Treasury Department on insurance issues related to the Resource Conservation and Recovery and “Superfund” Acts, and he has testified before the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee on insurance programs for large construction projects. He holds a B.A. degree from Hiram College. KATHLEEN J. TIERNEY is professor of sociology and director of natural hazards research and applications at the University of Colorado. Previously, she was professor of sociology and director of the disaster research center at the University of Delaware. With more than 25 years of experience in the disaster field, she has been involved in research on the social aspects and im- pacts of major earthquakes in California and Japan, floods in the Midwest, Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew, and many other natural and technological disaster events. Since September 2001 she has been directing a study on the organizational and community response in New York following the terror- ist attack on the World Trade Center. She has a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the Ohio State University.

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