Appendix B
Biographies of Committee Members

Paul S. Peercy (NAE), Chair, is dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He received his B.A. in physics from Berea College and M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Before moving to Madison, Dr. Peercy had been president of SEMI/SEMATECH, a nonprofit technical consortium of U.S.-owned and -operated companies that comprise the equipment and supplier infrastructure for the U.S. semiconductor industry. Prior to serving in that position he had been director of microelectronics and photonics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His research spanned several areas of solid-state and materials physics and engineering, including ferroelectricity, Raman and Brillouin scattering studies of solids, ion-solid interactions, laser-induced phase transformations, microelectronics and photonics, and solid-state devices. Dr. Peercy is a councilor of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and past councilor of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Materials Research Society, past vice president of the Materials Research Society, and past chair of the Division of Materials Physics of the APS. Dr. Peercy is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the IEEE, APS, and AAAS. He serves on the industrial advisory boards of various universities and national laboratories.


Collin L. Broholm is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Copenhagen in 1988. Dr. Broholm uses neutron scattering to explore anomalous quantum magnetism in low-dimensional, frustrated, and metallic systems. He has been a



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Appendix B Biographies of Committee Members Paul S. Peercy (NAE), Chair, is dean of the College of Engineering at the Univer- sity of Wisconsin at Madison. He received his B.A. in physics from Berea College and M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Before moving to Madison, Dr. Peercy had been president of SEMI/SEMATECH, a nonprofit technical consortium of U.S.-owned and -operated companies that comprise the equipment and supplier infrastructure for the U.S. semiconductor industry. Prior to serving in that position he had been director of microelectronics and photonics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His research spanned several areas of solid-state and materials physics and engineer- ing, including ferroelectricity, Raman and Brillouin scattering studies of solids, ion-solid interactions, laser-induced phase transformations, microelectronics and photonics, and solid-state devices. Dr. Peercy is a councilor of the American Asso- ciation for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and past councilor of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Materials Research Society, past vice president of the Materials Research Society, and past chair of the Division of Materials Physics of the APS. Dr. Peercy is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the IEEE, APS, and AAAS. He serves on the industrial advisory boards of various universities and national laboratories. Collin L. Broholm is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Johns Hopkins University. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Copenhagen in 1988. Dr. Broholm uses neutron scattering to explore anomalous quantum magnetism in low-dimensional, frustrated, and metallic systems. He has been a 

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aPPendix B  member of the Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Commit- tee and of various committees reviewing upgrade and instrumentation strategies for national and international neutron-scattering infrastructure. Dr. Broholm is directly involved with instrumentation design at the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) Center for Neutron Research and the Spallation Neutron Source. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Robert J. Cava is a professor of chemistry at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in ceramics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research expertise is in the area of solid-state chemistry, specifically focusing on the synthesis and characterization of transition metal oxide and intermetallic materials. He has directed the Princeton Materials Institute and was a distinguished member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories. He has received the Wulff Award in Materials Science, the American Chemical Society Prize in the Chemistry of Materials, and the Matthias Prize. Dr. Cava is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Ceramic Society. James R. Chelikowsky is the W.A. “Tex” Moncrief, Jr., Chair of Computational Materials and professor in the Departments of Physics, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. He obtained a B.S. degree in physics from kansas State University and a Ph.D. degree in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. His research interests are in the optical and dielectric properties of semiconductors, surface and interfacial phenomena in solids, point and extended defects in electronic materials, pressure-induced amor- phization in silicates and disordered systems, clusters and nanoregime systems, diffusion and microstructure of liquids, and the development of high-performance algorithms to predict the properties of materials. Dr. Chelikowsky is the recipient of the 2001 David Turnbull Award from the Materials Research Society and the 2006 David Adler Award from the American Physical Society. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society. Zachary Fisk is Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of California at Irvine. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California at San Diego. He has held positions at the University of Chicago, the University of Cali- fornia at San Diego, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Florida State University, and the Univeristy of California at Davis. Dr. Fisk’s research examines the electronic properties of magnetic and superconducting materials. In this work, he has excelled at creating high-quality crystals of these superconducting materials. He has received many awards and honors in recognition of his work in condensed-matter physics, including the American Physical Society’s International Prize for New Materials in 1990 and the E.O. Lawrence Award in 1992. He was elected a fellow of the American

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frontiers c rys ta l l i n e m at t e r  in Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994, and in 1996 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences for his work linking crystal chemistry with condensed-matter physics, which improved scientific insight into the transport and magnetic proper- ties of a variety of magnetic and superconducting materials. Dr. Fisk is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Patrick D. Gallagher is director of the National Institute of Standards and Technol- ogy (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Gallagher’s research interests include neutron- scattering instrumentation; diffraction of nanoscale structures, especially in soft condensed-matter systems such as liquids, polymers, and gels; and the experimental study of nonequilibrium structure and processes in complex condensed-matter systems. In 2000, Dr. Gallagher was a NIST agency representative at the National Science and Technology Council and the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), where he had responsibility in the areas of major science facilities, science funding, the government-university research partnership, radioactive waste man- agement, radiation protection regulations, science and security at Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, and laboratory reform. He is currently chair of OSTP’s Interagency Working Group on Neutron and Synchrotron Sources and a past member of the National Research Council’s Solid State Sciences Committee. He has also been a member of numerous review and evaluation committees for DOE and the National Science Foundation and at major neutron and synchrotron facilities. Laura H. Greene, Swanlund Professor of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, received her Ph.D. from Cornell University. She researches experimental condensed-matter physics focusing on strongly correlated elec- tron systems, primarily investigating the mechanisms of unconventional super- conductivity by planar tunneling and point-contact (Andreev reflection) electron spectroscopies. This research also involves growing novel materials and developing methods of materials microanalysis. Dr. Greene developed the course “How Things Work,” designed as an outreach for nonscience majors. She has served on the Inter- national Union of Pure and Applied Physics, the kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, the Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, the Sloan Foundation Fellow Selection Committee, the Board of Trustees for Gordon Research Conferences, the Board on Physics and Astronomy, and on vari- ous committees for the American Physical Society (APS), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Science Foundation, and the National Research Council. Dr. Greene is a fellow of the APS, the AAAS, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and she is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has received the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from the

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aPPendix B  APS and the E.O. Lawrence Award from the Department of Energy, and in 2007 was a visiting scholar for Phi Beta kappa. Eric D. Isaacs is director of the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the Argonne National Laboratory and professor of physics in the James Franck Institute at the University of Chicago. Previously he was director of the Semiconductor Physics Research Department and the Materials Physics Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. Dr. Isaacs received his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His current research centers on studies of novel electronic and magnetic materials, with a particular focus on creating images of new phenomena in reciprocal and real space at the nanoscale. Dr. Isaacs devel- ops modern synchrotron-based x-ray-scattering techniques, including coherent x-ray scattering and hard x-ray nanoprobes. He is a member of the Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a former councilor of the Division of Materials Physics of the American Physical Society, and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Peter B. Littlewood is head of the Department of Physics and the Cavendish Labo- ratory at the University of Cambridge. He earned a B.A. in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, with a 1-year intermediate sojourn at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a kennedy Scholar. He previously directed the Theory of Condensed Matter group at the Cavendish Laboratory and before that was head of the Theo- retical Physics Research Department at Bell Laboratories. His research interests are in condensed-matter physics, including novel materials and superconductors, semiconductor optics, nonlinear dynamics, and statistical physics. He is a fellow of the Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, and Trinity College Cambridge. Laurie E. McNeil is a professor of physics and astronomy and of applied and materials sciences at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. She is also chair of the Physics and Astronomy Department. Her research interests are in condensed-matter and materials physics, specializing in optical spectroscopy of semiconductors and insulators. From 1996 through 1999, Dr. McNeil held a Bowman and Gordon Gray Professorship for “excellence in inspirational teaching of undergraduate students.” During the fall of 2004, she held a Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship to produce a plan for the transformation of introductory physics teaching at UNC; the plan is now being implemented. She was the first recipient of the Tufts University kathryn A. McCarthy Lecturer in Physics, which honors a pioneering female physicist who also served as provost of Tufts. Dr. McNeil was one of three people invited by the American Association for the Advancement of

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frontiers c rys ta l l i n e m at t e r 0 in Science (AAAS) to speak at a conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as part of the AAAS lecture series on Women in Science and Engineering. In March 2002, Dr. McNeil served as a member of the U.S. delegation to the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics Conference on Women in Physics. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the University’s Academy of Dis- tinguished Teaching Scholars and of the Carolina Speakers program. Joel S. Miller is a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of Utah. He received his B.S. from Wayne State University and Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles. Dr. Miller held several positions in industry, including his work with the Xerox Corporation and DuPont before joining the faculty at the University of Utah. His research activities focus on new materials with fascinating magnetic, electrical, and optical properties. At the present time, his major effort is to prepare magnets based on molecular/organic/polymeric chemistry. Dr. Miller received the 2000 American Chemical Society Award for Chemistry of Materials, the 2007 American Physical Society McGroddy Prize, the 2004 Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology, and the 2003 Utah Award. He was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Fellow in 2000 and is a member of the Inorganic Synthesis Corporation. Loren Pfeiffer is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent. He received his bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in physics from the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Pfeiffer is an expert in molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), producing uniquely clean materials in which new physics has been discovered. He has also created a variation of MBE called cleaved-edge overgrowth, which allows fabrication of quantum dots, quantum wires, and other quantum-scale structures of unprecedented quality. Dr. Pfeiffer received the 2004 McGroddy Prize of the American Physical Society. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars. Ramamoorthy Ramesh is a professor of materials science and engineering and physics at the University of California at Berkeley. He graduated from the Univer- sity of California at Berkeley with a Ph.D. in materials science in 1987. His cur- rent research activities encompass probing the physics of nanoscale phenomena in complex oxide heterostructures, multifunctional oxides, approaches to creat- ing self-assembled functional nanostructures, integration of complex oxides with semiconductor technologies, and the use of nanoscale scanned probes to under- stand fundamental properties and dynamics in such materials. He was honored by the International Symposium on Integrated Ferroelectrics with an Outstanding Achievement Award in 2000. In 2001, he was awarded the Humboldt Senior Sci-

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aPPendix B  entist Prize by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and fellowship in the American Physical Society. In 2005, he was awarded the American Physical Society’s David Adler Lectureship. Arthur P. Ramirez is dean of the Jack Baskin School of Engineering at the Univer- sity of California at Santa Cruz. Prior to joining that university, Dr. Ramirez was leader of composites and device physics research at LGS, a subsidiary of Alcatel- Lucent, and also an adjunct professor of applied physics at Columbia University. He is also a former director of the Device Physics Research Department at Alcatel- Lucent’s Bell Laboratories and a group leader at the Los Alamos National Labora- tory. Dr. Ramirez received both his B.S. in physics and Ph.D. in physics from yale University. He has pioneered the field of geometrical frustration in magnetism research. His other research interests include low-dimensional magnetism, heavy- fermion systems, thermoelectric materials, colossal magnetoresistive materials, high-dielectric-constant materials, molecular electronics, and superconductivity in various systems, including molecular compounds, intermetallics, and oxides. Dr. Ramirez is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Hidenori Takagi has been a professor in the Department of Advanced Materials at the University of Tokyo since 1999 and chief scientist and director of the Magnetic Materials Laboratory, RIkEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) since 2001. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Tokyo. His current research interests are in physics of correlated transition metal oxides, exotic superconductivity, quantum magnetism, and oxide electronics. He has been awarded the IBM Science Prize, the Nissan Science Prize, and the H.k. Onnes Prize. Dan J. Thoma is a technical staff member at the Los Alamos National Labora- tory and director of the newly formed Materials Design Institute, a collaborative educational research program with the College of Engineering at the University of California at Davis. He received his B.S. degree in metallurgical engineer- ing from the University of Cincinnati and his M.S. and Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Dr. Thoma’s research interests include physical metallurgy, with a particular focus on microstructural development during materials processing. Within this context, his efforts have been devoted to alloying theory, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase trans- formations (both liquid/solid and solid/solid transitions), and property response as a function of microstructural evolution. Dr. Thoma has been active within the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS), having served as its president in 2003, on the board of directors as programming director, and as chair and member of multiple committees. He is also active in ASM International and the American

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frontiers c rys ta l l i n e m at t e r  in Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers, of which he has been elected to the board of trustees and is currently president-elect. Dr. Thoma is also leading the Revitalization Task Force of the Federation of Materials Society. He received the 2007 Distinguished Service Award from TMS and is U.S. Chair for a Joint Working Group on Nuclear Materials with the United kingdom.