Appendix
Committee Biographies

Stephen W. Barthold (Chair), DVM, Ph.D., IOM, is Director of the Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California–Davis where he is the Distinguished Professor of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, and of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine through joint appointments of the Schools of Veterinary Medicine and Medicine. Dr. Barthold received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California, his Ph.D. in experimental pathology from the University of Wisconsin, and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. He is nominated as chair because of his expertise in experimental pathology of infectious disease, and pathology of laboratory animals. His research involves mechanisms of persistent infection and antibiotic tolerance with Borrelia burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease), using mouse models. Dr. Barthold is the recipient of several research career awards, including the AALAS Nathan R. Brewer Award, University of California Alumni Achievement Award, the Francis Schofield Medal from the Ontario Veterinary College, Honorary Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and the AVMA Charles River Prize. He has served on numerous national scientific advisory and review committees, and editorial boards. Dr. Barthold is an IOM member and currently serves as Chair of ILAR Council.


Donald Bolser, Ph.D., Professor, Respiratory Physiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida (Gainesville). Dr. Bolser received his Ph.D. from the University of South Florida and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Calgary and



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Appendix Committee Biographies Stephen W. Barthold (Chair), DVM, Ph.D., IOM, is Director of the Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California–Davis where he is the Distinguished Professor of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, and of Medical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine through joint appointments of the Schools of Veterinary Medicine and Medicine. Dr. Barthold received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of California, his Ph.D. in experimental pathology from the University of Wisconsin, and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. He is nominated as chair because of his expertise in experimental pathology of infectious disease, and pathology of labora- tory animals. His research involves mechanisms of persistent infection and antibiotic tolerance with Borrelia­burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease), using mouse models. Dr. Barthold is the recipient of several research career awards, including the AALAS Nathan R. Brewer Award, University of Cali- fornia Alumni Achievement Award, the Francis Schofield Medal from the Ontario Veterinary College, Honorary Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and the AVMA Charles River Prize. He has served on numerous national scientific advisory and review committees, and editorial boards. Dr. Barthold is an IOM member and currently serves as Chair of ILAR Council. Donald Bolser, Ph.D., Professor, Respiratory Physiology, Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida (Gainesville). Dr. Bolser received his Ph.D. from the University of South Florida and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Calgary and 

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100 APPENDIX University of Oklahoma. He worked as a staff scientist at Schering-Plough Research Institute prior to his current position. Dr. Bolser is on the editorial board of the Journal­of­Applied­Physiology, has helped develop evidence- based clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough for the American College of Chest Physicians, and has served as a consultant for the pharmaceutical industry. His research involves inves- tigations in pathology and physiology of cough as well as the use of rat and feline models to observe spontaneously active and recruited brainstem neurons during cough. He aims to model the configuration of the brainstem neural network controlling airway protection, and to identify the mechanism of action of cough suppressant drugs. Kelly D. garcia, DVM, Ph.D., Clinical Veterinarian, University of Illinois at Chicago. Her experience with supervising the care and husbandry of large animals at UIC includes a colony of over 80 dogs in addition to sheep, pigs, cows, rabbits, chinchillas, and guinea pigs. She has published several papers in journals such as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the Journal of Neurosciences. Dr. Garcia has collaborated on a research project studying G-protein regulation of ion channels and com- pleted a post-doctoral training program in laboratory animal medicine. She is a Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Currently, Dr. Garcia oversees operations at the UIC Biologic Resources Laboratory surgical facility. At UIC, Dr. Garcia has served on numerous committees including as a Council Member on the National Institutes of Health National Advisory Research Resources Committee and as a past president of the Chicago Branch of AALAS. Dr. Garcia currently serves on the ACLAM Foundation Committee and the American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners Communications and Outreach Committee. Joseph R. Haywood, Ph.D., is Professor and Chairperson, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, and Assistant Vice President for Regulatory Affairs at Michigan State University. He uses rats and non-human primates to study central and peripheral actions of hormones and drugs that regulate the sympathetic nervous system and blood pressure. His work has specifi- cally targeted the mechanisms of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system as stimuli for sodium- and obesity-dependent hypertension. Dr. Haywood has been an advocate for the humane use of animals in research and edu- cation for over 20 years. He served on the Council on Accreditation for the Association for the Assessment and Accreditation for Laboratory Animal Care for 10 years. He is presently on the Governing Board of the Interna- tional Council of Laboratory Animal Science representing the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Dr. Haywood has served on fac- ulties for national meetings for the American Physiological Society, IACUC

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101 APPENDIX 101, Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research, and Scientists’ Center for Animal Welfare discussing the humane use of animals in research and teaching. Stuart Leland, DVM, Director, BioResources at Wyeth Research where he is the Attending Veterinarian and Chair of the Government and Public Policy Working Group. Dr. Leland oversees an NSF vivarium supporting rodent and nonhuman primate research for neuroscience and a genetically modi- fied animal program. Previously, he has served as Head, Research Support and Veterinary Services at Aventis and as Associate Director for the Institute for Human Gene Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania. His research has involved molecular and pathogenic characterization of rat parvovi- rus and parvovirus-induced oncosuppression. He is board certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the NJ Association for Biomedical Research and is Chair, Program Committee for the 2009 National AALAS Meeting in Denver, Colorado. Lila Miller, DVM, Vice President of Veterinary Outreach, American Society of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) in New York. She is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine and at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medi- cine. Dr. Miller has over 30 years experience working in the field of animal sheltering and shelter medicine at the ASPCA in New York City. She is coeditor of the textbook Shelter­Medicine­for­Veterinarians­and­Staff and just completed editing a textbook on the management of infectious diseases in animal shelters. She coordinated the first course on shelter medicine offered at a veterinary college in the U.S. (Cornell), on the Veterinary Information Network, and in Turkey. Dr. Miller co-founded and is past president and past member of the board of directors of the Association of Shelter Veteri- narians. She writes a regular shelter medicine column for Animal Shelter- ing magazine and has written and lectured extensively on animal cruelty. She received the 2008 American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Animal Welfare Award and 2005 Hills Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics award from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). She was a member of the New York State Veterinary Board and board of directors of the American Association of Human Animal Bond Veterinarians (AAHABV), and is a current member of the National Board of Veterinary Medical Exam- iners (NBVME). Randall J. Nelson, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology and Asso- ciate Vice Chancellor for Research at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). He has extensive experience in reviewing proto-

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102 APPENDIX cols and directing IACUC activities. He received a B.S. in Psychology from Duke University in 1975 and completed his doctoral degree in anatomy from Vanderbilt University in 1979. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at San Francisco, he was a Staff Fellow at the National Institutes of Health, first in the Laboratory of Neurophysiology, and finally in the Laboratory of Neuropsychology, both at NIMH. He came to UTHSC in 1984 and since then has conducted research into the control of hand movement and taught Human Gross Anatomy. He has served as a member of several NIH study sections. He is a former member of the Com- mittee on Animal Research of the Society for Neuroscience and is currently the Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Scientist Center for Animal Wel- fare and serves as an ad hoc consultant for the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International. He also served as a scientific delegate to an international harmonization workshop held in conjunction with the 5th World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences. He is also a former member of ILAR Council. James Serpell, Ph.D., is the Marie A. Moore Professor of Humane Ethics and Animal Welfare at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, where he also directs the Center for the Interaction of Animals & Society (CIAS). He has extensive knowledge of animal behavior and wel- fare of companion animals, the development of human attitudes to animals, and the history of human-animal relationships. He established the Com- panion Animal Research Group at the University of Cambridge in England before moving to his current position at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Serpell is the immediate past president of the International Society for Anthrozoology (ISAZ), and serves on the editorial boards of most of the major journals on animal welfare, applied animal behavior, and human- animal interactions. Michael R. Talcott, DVM, Director of Veterinary Surgical Services, Divi- sion of Comparative Medicine and Research Assistant Professor of Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. His expertise is in clinical and post-operative care of most non-rodent species including dogs, cats, rabbits, sheep, goats, and pigs. He also provides surgical services in cardiology, orthopedics, vascular surgery, interventional radiology, and gen- eral surgery. In addition to his clinical/surgical duties, Dr. Talcott reviews all experimental protocols, advises investigators regarding animal models and experimental design, and provides oversight of all experimental use of these species. He is responsible for inspecting, certifying, and approving dog and cat vendors for Washington University. Dr. Talcott is board certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine and has served on the Public Policy Committee and Chair of the Career Pathways Commit-

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103 APPENDIX tee. Dr. Talcott is also active in the Academy of Surgical Research, serving as President in 2008, and is on the Board of Trustees for the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International (AAALAC). He is also involved in many efforts to educate the public about the use of animals in research, including presentations at local and national meetings and educational tours for groups from elementary school age through college age and adult. Robert Whitney, DVM, RADM, Retired, U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Whitney is CoFounder of Earthspan—a non-profit organization provid- ing advanced technologies for the conservation of ecosystems, biodiversity, and environmental health. In the U.S. Public Health Service he served as Chief Veterinary Officer, Deputy Surgeon General, and Acting Surgeon General of the United States. Before 1992, he was Director of the NIH National Center for Research Resources. Prior to joining PHS, Dr. Whitney directed the U.S. Army training program in laboratory animal medicine and served in Vietnam as commander of a veterinary medical detachment. He is a Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Dr. Whitney also serves on a number of boards of or is consultant to animal welfare or environmental awareness groups.

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