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Appendix F Committee Biographies Harold C. Sox, M.D., M.A.C.P. (Co-Chair), is the editor of Annals of In- ternal Medicine. He graduated from Stanford University (B.S. in physics) and Harvard Medical School and served as a medical intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. He spent 15 years on the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine, where he was the chief of the division of general internal medicine and director of ambulatory care at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center. In 1988, he returned to Dartmouth where he served for 13 years as Joseph M. Huber Professor and chair of the de- partment of medicine before taking his present position with the American College of Physicians. Dr. Sox was the President of the American College of Physicians from 1998 to 1999. He chaired the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force from 1990 to 1995, the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study HIV Transmission through Blood Products, and the Institute of Medicine Committee on Health Effects Associated with Exposures Experienced in the Gulf War. He chaired the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee of the Center for Medicare Services from 1999 to 2003. He currently chairs the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Founda- tion Physician Faculty Scholars Program and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in 1993. His books include Medical Decision Making, Common Diagnostic Tests: Selection and Interpretation, and HIV and the Blood Supply: An Analysis of Crisis Decision Making. 

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER Sheldon Greenfield, M.D. (Co-Chair), an internationally recognized leader in quality of care and health services research, is the Donald Bren Professor of Medicine and executive director of the Health Policy Research Institute, University of California at Irvine. Dr. Greenfield’s research has focused on primary care outcomes, quality of chronic disease care, patient participa- tion in care, and assessment of comorbidity. He was the 1995 recipient of the PEW Health Professions Commission Award for lifetime achievement in Primary Care Research. Dr. Greenfield is a recipient of the Glaser Award of the Society of General Internal Medicine and the 1999 Novartis Global Outcomes Leadership Award. Dr. Greenfield is the 2006 recipient of the Founders Award by the American College of Medical Quality (ACMQ). Dr Greenfield was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1996. He chaired the IOM Committee on Guidance for Designing a National Health Care Disparities Report, and was chair of the IOM Cancer Survivorship Report. He was the chair of the National Diabetes Quality Improvement Alliance. His current research focus is on performance assessment at the individual physician level, heterogeneity of treatment effects, and quality of chronic disease care for ethnic and racial minorities. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard College and his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Christine K. Cassel, M.D., M.A.C.P., is president and CEO of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ABIM Foundation, and an ex- pert in geriatric medicine, bioethics and quality of care. Dr. Cassel, board certified in internal medicine and geriatric medicine, was the first female board chair of the ABIM and the first female president of the American Col- lege of Physicians. She chaired influential Institute of Medicine reports on end-of-life care and public health. In April 2009, Dr. Cassel was appointed by President Obama to the President’s Advisory Council on Science and Technology. She has also held leadership positions in academic medicine, including the University of Chicago, Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, and Oregon Health & Science University. An active scholar and lecturer, Dr. Cassel is the author or coauthor of 14 books and more than 150 journal articles on geriatric medicine, aging, bioethics and health policy. Her most recent book is Medicare Matters: What Geriatric Medicine Can Teach American Health Care. Kay Dickersin, M.A., Ph.D., is Professor of Epidemiology at Johns Hop- kins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Director of the Center for Clinical Trials. She is also the director of the U.S. Cochrane Center (USCC) and is director of the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group US Satellite. The USCC supports Consumers United for Evidence-based Healthcare (CUE), a partnership with health and consumer advocacy organizations, started

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 APPENDIX F in 2003. Dr. Dickersin’s main research contributions have been in clinical trials, systematic reviews, publication bias, trials registers, and the devel- opment and utilization of methods for the evaluation of medical care and its effectiveness. Dr. Dickersin currently is engaged in or has recently com- pleted projects funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Blue Shield California, the Cochrane Col- laboration, and the Center for Medical Technology Policy. At the Institute of Medicine (IOM), she has been a member of many committees, including the Committee on Reviewing Evidence to Identify Highly Effective Clinical Services. Dr. Dickersin received a Master’s Degree in zoology, specializing in cell biology, from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Hygiene and Public Health. Among her honors, Kay served as president of the Society for Clinical Trials (2008-2009) and has been elected to membership in the American Epidemiology Society and the IOM. Alan M. Garber, M.D., Ph.D., is the Henry J. Kaiser Jr. Professor and a professor of medicine at Stanford, where he directs the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. He is a staff physician at the Palo Alto VA and directs the Health Care Program of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). He is a member of the Panel of Health Advisers of the Congressional Budget Office, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He served as the chair of the Medicare Evidence Development and Coverage Advisory Committee (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services), as a member of the National Advisory Council on Aging (National Institutes of Health), and as a member of many committees of the National Institutes of Health and of the National Academies. His work addresses methods for improving health care delivery and financing, particularly for the elderly. It encompasses technology evaluation, analysis of the causes of health expen- diture growth, and health care productivity. A summa cum laude graduate of Harvard College, he received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard and an M.D. with research honors from Stanford, and trained in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Constantine Gatsonis, Ph.D., is professor of medical science (Biostatis- tics) and founding director of the Center for Statistical Sciences at Brown University. Dr. Gatsonis is a leading authority on the evaluation of diag- nostic and screening tests and has extensive involvement in methodologic research in medical technology assessment and in health services and outcomes research. He is Group Statistician of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN), a National Cancer Institute funded

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER collaborative group conducting multicenter studies of diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapy for cancer. A major focus of the research publi- cations and current interests of Dr. Gatsonis is on Bayesian inference and its applications to problems in biostatistics, with emphasis on the evalu- ation of diagnostic imaging and health services and outcomes research. Dr. Gatsonis has served on the Institute of Medicine Immunization Safety Review Committee, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on Identifying the Needs of the Forensic Sciences Community (co-chair), the NAS Committee to Study Engineering Aviation Security Environments, the NAS Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics, the Commis- sion on Technology Assessment of the American College of Radiology, the Research Development Committee of the Radiology Society of North America, the HSDG Study Section of the Agency for Health Care Policy Research review panels of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration, and technical expert panels for Health Care Financing Administration/Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. He is the founding editor in chief of Health Services and Out- comes Research Methodology, an associate editor of the Annals of Ap- plied Statistics, Bayesian Analysis, Statistics and Probability Letters, and Clinical Trials and convenor of the Diagnostic and Screening Test Methods Working Group, Cochrane Collaboration. Dr. Gatsonis was elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the Association for Health Services Research. He received his BA in mathematics, magna cum laude, from Princeton and his PhD in mathematical statistics from Cornell. Gary L. Gottlieb, M.D., M.b.A., serves as president of Brigham and Wom- en’s/Faulkner Hospitals, a position he has held since March 1, 2002. He is a professor of psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. Partners Health- Care recruited Dr. Gottlieb to become the first chairman of Partners Psy- chiatry in 1998 and he served in that capacity through 2005. In 2000, he added the role of president of the North Shore Medical Center where he served until early 2002. Prior to coming to Boston, Dr. Gottlieb spent 15 years in positions of increasing leadership in health care in Philadelphia. In 1983, he arrived at the University of Pennsylvania as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar. Through that program, he earned an M.B.A. with distinction in Health Care Administration from Penn’s Wharton Graduate School of Business Administration. He credits the pro- gram with building a foundation of interest in health policy, management, and academic leadership. Dr. Gottlieb went on to establish Penn Medical Center’s first program in geriatric psychiatry and developed it into a nation- ally recognized research, training, and clinical program. Dr. Gottlieb rose to become executive vice chair and interim chair of Penn’s Department of Psychiatry and the Health System’s Associate Dean for Managed Care. In

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 APPENDIX F 1994, he became director and CEO of Friends Hospital in Philadelphia, the nation’s oldest, independent, freestanding psychiatric hospital. In addition to his noteworthy academic, clinical and management record, Dr. Gottlieb has published extensively in geriatric psychiatry and health care policy. He is a past president of the American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry. Dr. Gottlieb also was a director of NASDAQ-traded OVID Technologies from 1997 to 1998 and participated in its acquisition by Wolters Kluwer Publishing. Dr. Gottlieb received his B.S. cum laude from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his M.D. from the Albany Medical College of Union University in a 6-year accelerated biomedical program. He completed his internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at New York Uni- versity/Bellevue Medical Center. Now, as a recognized community leader in Boston, Dr. Gottlieb also focuses his attention on workforce development and disparities in health care. He was appointed by Mayor Thomas Menino as chairman of the Private Industry Council, the city’s workforce develop- ment board, which partners with education, labor, higher education, the community, and government to provide oversight and leadership to public and private workforce development programs. In 2004-2005, he served as co-chair of the Mayor’s Task Force to Eliminate Health Disparities. Dr. Gottlieb is slated to become the president and CEO of Partners HealthCare System in January 2010. James A. Guest, J.D., became president and CEO of Consumers Union in February 2001 after a long career in public service and the consumer inter- est, including 21 years as chair of Consumers Union’s Board of Directors. Consumers Union is the expert, independent, nonprofit organization that publishes Consumer Reports magazine, ConsumerReports.org, Consumer Reports on Health, and other special publications. Consumers Union oper- ates the Consumer Reports Health Ratings Center, the Best Buy Drugs Pro- gram, which was supported initially, in part, by a grant from the National Library of Medicine, and other programs relating to health care quality and safety for which it also may seek federal grants. Consumers Union has a public policy and advocacy division which advocates for governmental and marketplace policies in the consumer interest. Mr. Guest is a member of the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Evidence-Based Medicine, the Quality Alliance Steering Committee, and the Lucian Leape Institute of the National Patient Safety Foundation. He has spoken before various health stakeholder groups including the Association of Academic Health Centers, America’s Health Insurance Plans, the World Health Care Congress, the National Business Group on Health, and others. Mr. Guest also serves as vice presi- dent of Consumers International, a federation of more than 225 consumer organizations from 115 countries that serves as the global campaigning voice for consumers around the world. Mr. Guest’s public service career

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER spans more than three decades. After graduating from Amherst College, studying economics at MIT as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, and graduating from Harvard Law School, he worked as a legislative assistant to Senator Edward Kennedy. In the early 1970s, Mr. Guest moved to Vermont, where he served as Banking and Insurance Commissioner, Secretary of State, and Secretary of Development and Community Affairs. Over the past 20 years, he has served as CEO of several service organizations and advocacy groups including Planned Parenthood of Maryland, Handgun Control, Inc. and the Center to Prevent Handgun Violence, and the American Pain Foundation, a national consumer information, education, and advocacy organization for pain prevention and management. Mark Helfand, M.D., M.P.H., M.S., is a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology at Oregon Health & Science University and a practicing physician at the Portland VA Medical Center. He has directed the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Cen- ter since 1997 and is also editor in chief of the journal Medical Decision Making. Dr. Helfand received his A.B. and B.S. from Stanford University and his M.D. and MPH from the University of Illinois School of Medicine. He specialized in internal medicine at Stanford, where he also completed a fellowship and earned an M.S. in health services research. Dr. Helfand has been a leader in methods for comparative effectiveness research. From 1998 to 2002, Dr. Helfand led a team that helped the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force prioritize topics and develop evidence-based guidelines. In the area of comparative effectiveness, he was a founder of the Drug Effective- ness Review Project (2003-2006) and, since 2004, has served as director of the Scientific Resource Center for AHRQ’s Effective Health Care program. In addition to AHRQ, Dr. Helfand’s work is funded by the Veterans Ad- ministration, the National Library of Medicine, Consumers Union, and the Society for Medical Decision Making. Maria Carolina Hinestrosa, M.P.H.,∗ is the executive vice president for Programs and Planning at the National Breast Cancer Coalition (NBCC), and founder and former executive director of Nueva Vida, a support or- ganization for Latinas with cancer. She is a breast cancer survivor, having been diagnosed with this disease in 1994 and in 2000. In 2008, she was diagnosed with a radiation-induced sarcoma, a consequence of her prior breast cancer treatment. Ms. Hinestrosa chairs the Integration Panel of the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, serves on the National Advisory Council and on the Stakeholder Group of the Effective *Deceased.

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 APPENDIX F Health Care Program at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Qual- ity; on the Roadmap and the Communications Groups of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Roundtable on Evidence-Based Medicine, and on the Oversight Body of the Ethical Force of the American Medical Association, among other national committees. She has served on the IOM’s committees on Technologies for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer (Mammography and Beyond) and Reauthorization of MQSA (Improving the Quality of Breast Imaging Standards), as well as on the Breast Cancer Technical Panel of the National Quality Forum, on the National Action Plan on Breast Cancer and on the National Cancer Institute’s Central Institutional Review Board. Ms. Hinestrosa is an economist from Universidad del Rosario in Bogota, Colombia; obtained a masters degree in economics from Western Illinois University as a Fulbright Scholar, and a Masters of Public Health from the George Washington University in Washington, DC. Prior to her service as a consumer advocate, she worked as a business economist and strategic planner in Colombia and New Zealand. George J. Isham, M.D., M.S., chief health officer and plan medical direc- tor, is responsible for health promotion and disease prevention, research, and health professionals’ education. He is also responsible for the health dimension of HealthPartners’ strategic plan and is active in state and na- tional health policy issues. As plan medical director, he is responsible for quality and utilization management for HealthPartners Health Plan. He is a founding board member of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improve- ment, a collaborative of Twin Cities medical groups and health plans that is implementing clinical practice guidelines in Minnesota. Dr. Isham is currently a co-chair of a State of Minnesota Health Care Reform Task Force that is working on defining episodes of care. Dr. Isham provides leadership to other care delivery systems through service on the board of directors for Presbyterian Health Services in Albuquerque, New Mexico and the External Advisory board of the Marshfield Clinic in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Dr. Isham is active nationally as a member of the board of directors of the American’s Health Insurance Plans, the Alliance of Com- munity Health Plans, the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Care, and Bridges to Excellence. He is past co-chair and current member of the National Committee for Quality Assurance’s (NCQA) Committee on Per- formance Measurement which oversees the Health Plan quality measure- ment standards and currently chairs the NCQA’s committee on Physician Recognition Programs. He is a member of the National Priority Partners effort convened by the National Quality Forum, chairing the population health workgroup of that effort. He has served on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Task Force on Community Preventive Services, on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Advisory

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0 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER Board for the National Guideline Clearinghouse, and currently is a mem- ber of the U.S. Task Force on Clinical Preventive Services. He currently serves on the advisory board for the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review at Harvard. Dr. Isham has served on the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice and chaired the IOM committees that authored the reports Priority Areas for National Action: Transforming Health Care Quality and The State of the USA Health Indicators. Dr. Isham currently chairs the IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy. He was invited to present the IOM’s Rosenthal Lecture for 2005 on “Next Steps Toward Higher Quality Health Care.” In addition, he has served on a number of committees, has presented to a number of workshops, and has served as a reviewer of reports and workshop proceed- ings. In 2003, Dr. Isham was appointed as a lifetime National Associate of the National Academies of Science in recognition of his contributions to the work of the IOM. Arthur A. Levin, M.P.H., is co-founder and the director of the Center for Medical Consumers, a New York City based nonprofit organization committed to informed consumer and patient health care decision mak- ing, patient safety, evidence-based, high-quality medicine and health care system transparency. It receives no funding from the drug, device or health care industry. Mr. Levin was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Committee on the Quality of Health Care that published the To Err is Hu- man and Crossing the Quality Chasm reports. He also served on a number of other IOM committees, most recently one that released its report Know- ing What Works in Health Care: A Roadmap for the Nation, published last winter. He is a member of the IOM Board for Health Care Services. Mr. Levin is co-chair of the National Committee for Quality Assurance Com- mittee on Performance Measures and a member of the National Quality Forum Consensus Standards Approval Committee (CSAC). Levin is also on the Board of the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making, dedicated to supporting patients and families in their health care decision making. Levin has served as the consumer representative on the FDA’s Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On the health information and exchange technology front, Levin is on the board of THINC, a not-for-profit regional health information organiza- tion located in the mid-Hudson Valley and is a founding board member of the public-private partnership coordinating statewide HIT development and implementation, the New York State E-Health Collaborative (NYeC). Levin earned his M.P.H. degree in health policy from Columbia Univer- sity School of Public Health and a B.A. degree in philosophy from Reed College.

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 APPENDIX F JoAnn E. Manson, M.D., Dr.P.H., M.P.H., is professor of medicine and the Elizabeth Fay Brigham Professor of Women’s Health at Harvard Medi- cal School, chief of the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and co-director of the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at BWH. An endocrinologist and epidemiologist, Dr. Manson is actively involved in women’s health re- search, including several large-scale clinical trials and observational studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and cancer. Her research has focused on the role of reproductive and hormonal factors, lifestyle and behavioral variables that influence chronic disease risk, health promotion and research translation, clinical trial methodology, and novel plasma and genetic markers as predictors of CVD, diabetes, and cancer. Dr. Manson is Principal Investigator of the Boston center for the Women’s Health Initia- tive (WHI), the CVD component of the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study, the Women’s Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Trial, the Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial, and other studies. She has published more than 700 articles in medical and scientific journals. Dr. Manson is the recipient of numerous awards, including the “Woman In Science Award” from the American Medical Women’s Association, the Harvard College “Women’s Professional Achievement Award,” the Bowditch Award for Excellence in Public Health, the Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Health Research Award from the North American Menopause Society, the International Menopause Society’s Henry Burger Prize, and others. She is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians, the American Epidemiological Society, and an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and she serves on a number of editorial and advisory boards, including the Board of the North American Menopause Society and the Sci- entific Advisory Board of the Harvard HealthLetter and Nutrition Action HealthLetter. Dr. Manson received her A.B. from Harvard University, her M.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and her M.P.H. and Dr.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard University apply for and receive grants from the federal government and industry on health-related issues, including comparative effectiveness. Katie Maslow, M.S.W., graduated from Stanford and received her M.S.W. degree from Howard University. She is the director for Policy Development at the Alzheimer’s Association. Her various projects at the Association en- compass project management and advocacy on the national level on many aspects of Alzheimer’s and dementia care. She directed the Association’s initiatives on managed care and co-directed its multisite demonstration project, Chronic Care Networks for Alzheimer’s Disease. She also directed the Association’s demonstration project on improving hospital care for

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER people with dementia, which included the development of training materials for hospital nurses caring for this population in partnership with the John A. Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. She represented the Association on the National Assisted Living Workgroup and is the primary author of the Association’s Alzheimer’s Facts and Figures, 2008. Before joining the Alzheimer’s Association, Ms. Maslow worked for 12 years at the U.S. Of- fice of Technology Assessment, studying policy issues in aging, Alzheimer’s disease, long-term care, end-of-life, and case management. Ms. Maslow’s current employer, the Alzheimer’s Association, receives grants from the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Administration on Aging, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, long-term care provider organizations, and pharmaceutical and other private companies. Ms. Maslow has served on numerous government and non-government advisory panels on aging, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, family caregiving, home care, assisted living, nursing home care, and care coordination. She has served on the national board of the American Society of Aging (ASA) and won the Society’s ASA award in 2003. She is a member of the American Geriatrics Society, the Gerontological Society of America, and the National Association of Social Workers. Mark b. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D., is currently the director of the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform, senior fellow in economic studies, and Leonard D. Schaeffer Director’s Chair in Health Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Before joining Brookings he was the administrator of the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He is an internist and economist with an interest in developing innovative statisti- cal methods for using observational data to estimate the effects of medical interventions. His research studies have focused on the economic and policy factors influencing medical treatment decisions and health outcomes; tech- nological change in health care and its consequences for health and medical expenditures; and the relationship between health and economic well-being. He has previously served as a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ National Cancer Policy Board, associate editor of the Journal of Health Economics, and co- principal investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, a longitudinal study of the health and economic well-being of older Americans. During 2001 and 2002 he served in the White House as a senior policy director for health care and related economic issues. He has twice received the Ar- row Award for Outstanding Research in Health Economics. He earned his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his M.D. from the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology,

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 APPENDIX F and completed a residency in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Sally C. Morton, Ph.D., M.S., is vice president for Statistics and Epide- miology at RTI International. RTI receives funding from the federal gov- ernment, foundations, and industry for research on health-related issues, including comparative effectiveness. Dr. Morton is the 2009 president of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT). She served as a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Reviewing Evidence to Identify Highly Effective Clinical Services. She does not receive compensation for any professional activity. Dr. Morton is an Adjunct Professor of Biostatistics at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Public Health, and is a fellow of the ASA and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She is a meta-analytic expert for the RTI–University of North Carolina (UNC) Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC), which receives funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Her research focuses on synthesis in evidence-based medicine, and surveys of vulnerable populations, and she has received of the AHSR Article-of-the-Year Award, and the AAPOR Policy Impact Award. Dr. Morton received a Ph.D. in statistics, an M.S. in operations research, a B.S. in mathematical sciences from Stanford, and an M.Sc. in statistics from the London School of Economics. Prior to joining RTI, Dr. Morton was the chair in Statistics and head of the Statistics Group at the RAND Corporation. Neil R. Powe, M.D., M.P.H., M.b.A., is the Constance B. Wofsy Distin- guished Professor and vice chair of medicine at the University of California San Francisco and chief of the Medical Service at San Francisco General Hospital. Until recently, he was the James F. Fries Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epi- demiology and Clinical Research, a multidisciplinary research and training center at Johns Hopkins focused on clinical and population-based research. He also was professor of epidemiology and health policy and management at Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health and founding director of the Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center. He has published over 300 articles on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases, value of health care technologies, and the effectiveness of the health care system. His major areas of interest and expertise are kidney and cardiovascular diseases, effectiveness and outcomes research, and economic evaluations in health care. He has studied physician decision making and other determinants of use of medical practices including payers’ decisions about insurance

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER coverage for new medical technologies, the effect of financial incentives on the use of technology, efficiency and outcomes in for-profit versus nonprofit health care institutions, and the relation between hospital volume, technol- ogy and outcomes. Dr. Powe receives major funding for his work from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His work is also currently being supported by research grants from the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making and other charitable organizations. Among Dr. Powe’s many honors are member- ship in the Institute of Medicine, the John M. Eisenberg National Award for Career Achievement in Research from the Society of General Internal Medicine and the Distinguished Educator Award from the Association of Clinical Research Training. Joe v. Selby, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the Division of Research, Kai- ser Permanente, Northern California. He conducts research in the areas of cancer screening, diabetes outcomes and quality improvement research. He is a family physician, clinical epidemiologist and health services researcher. He also serves as lecturer in the Department of Epidemiology and Biosta- tistics, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, and as a Consulting Professor, Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Selby was a member of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research study section for Health Care Quality and Effective- ness from 1999 through 2003. He is past chair and a member of Kaiser Permanente’s National Research Council and of the Governing Board of the HMO Research Network. He was a commissioned officer in the Public Health Service from 1976 to 1983 and received the Commissioned Officer’s Award in 1981. Dr. Selby has authored or co-authored over 200 peer-re- viewed scientific publications, as well as numerous editorials and book chapters. His publications cover a spectrum of topics from colon cancer screening and diabetes outcomes research to the delivery of primary care, quality measurement and quality improvement. Dr. Selby’s current research includes clinical comparative effectiveness studies in the areas of diabetes and hypertension care, with funding from the Agency for Healthcare Re- search and Quality, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He also serves as the director of a large research center in which a number of researchers apply for fund- ing to conduct comparative effectiveness studies across a variety of clinical and programmatic areas. Lisa Simpson, M.b., b.Ch., M.P.H., FAAP, is director of the Child Policy Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and a professor of pediatrics in the Division of Health Policy and Clinical Effec- tiveness, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati. Dr. Simpson,

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 APPENDIX F a board-certified pediatrician, also serves as the national director for Child Health Policy at the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality, an education and research organization dedicated solely to improving the quality of health care provided to children. A nationally recognized health services and policy researcher, Dr. Simpson has led studies of the safety, quality and effectiveness of care for children and adolescents, the role of health information technology in improving care for children, disparities in care for children and youth, the health policy response to childhood obesity, and the role of policies in advancing child health at both state and national levels. She was formerly the deputy director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Maternal and Child Health Director in Hawaii. Dr. Simpson earned her undergraduate and medical degrees at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland) and an M.P.H. at the Univer- sity of Hawaii, and she completed a post-doctoral fellowship in health services research and health policy at the University of California, San Francisco. She is also an elected member of three organizations’ Board of Directors, AcademyHealth, the Coalition for Health Services Research, and the National eHealth Collaborative, as well as numerous other national committees. She previously served on an Institute of Medicine Committee on improving the evidence base for health care (2008) and has recently been appointed by Governor Beshear to co-chair the Committee on Child Health and Wellbeing of the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s Commission on Philanthropy. She has received numerous awards including the Excellence in Public Service Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Senior Executive Service Meritorious Presidential Rank Award, the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award, and, most recently, the 2007 Health Policy Researcher of the Year award from the Health Policy Institute of Ohio. Sean Tunis, M.D., M.Sc., is the founder and director of the Center for Medical Technology Policy (CMTP) in San Francisco, where he works with health care decision makers, experts and stakeholders to develop methods, strategies and policies for comparative effectiveness research. CMTP re- ceives support for this work from a number of foundations, government grants, as well as health plans, life sciences companies, and medical profes- sional societies. Through September 2005, Dr. Tunis was the director of the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality and chief medical officer at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). In this role, he had lead responsibility for clinical policy and quality for the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which provide health coverage to over 100 million U.S. citizens. Dr. Tunis supervised the development of national coverage policies, quality standards for Medicare and Medicaid providers, quality measurement and public reporting initiatives, and the Quality Improvement Organization

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 INITIAL NATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR CER program. As chief medical officer, Dr. Tunis served as the senior advisor to the CMS Administrator on clinical and scientific policy. He also co-chaired the CMS Council on Technology and Innovation. Dr. Tunis joined CMS in 2000 as the director of the Coverage and Analysis Group. Before joining CMS, Dr. Tunis was a senior research scientist with the Technology As- sessment Group, where his focus was on the design and implementation of prospective comparative effectiveness trials and clinical registries. Dr. Tunis also served as the director of the Health Program at the Congressional Of- fice of Technology Assessment and as a health policy advisor to the U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources, where he participated in policy development regarding pharmaceutical and device regulation. He received a B.S. in biology and history of science from the Cornell University School of Agriculture, and a medical degree and masters in health services research from the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Tunis did his residency training at UCLA and the University of Maryland in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and holds adjunct faculty positions at Johns Hopkins and Stanford Univer- sity Schools of Medicine. I. Steven udvarhelyi, M.D., M.Sc., is senior vice president and chief medical officer for Independence Blue Cross and its affiliated companies (IBC). In this role, Dr. Udvarhelyi has overall responsibility for medical management programs and policies, provider contracting and provider relations, phar- macy services, and informatics. Specific areas of responsibility in medical management include utilization management, case management, disease management, quality management, prevention and wellness, claim payment policy, and member and provider appeals and grievances. In overseeing informatics, Dr. Udvarhelyi is responsible for corporate-wide information management and reporting activities. Dr. Udvarhelyi also has oversight over IBC’s pharmacy benefit management subsidiary. Dr. Udvarhelyi is a board-certified internist and has over 15 years of experience in the managed care industry. He received an A.B. from Harvard College, an M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and an M.S. in Health Services Administration from the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to his career in the managed care and insurance industry, Dr. Udvarhelyi was a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and has published numer- ous articles on quality in health care. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the National Council of Physician Executives of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Associa- tion, and on the Chief Medical Officers Committee of America’s Health Insurance Plans. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM)

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 APPENDIX F Roundtable on Evidence-Based Medicine, and has served on other IOM committees in the past. A. Eugene Washington, M.D., M.Sc., is executive vice chancellor and pro- vost at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he is also professor of gynecology, epidemiology, and health policy in the School of Medicine. He has been a national leader in assessing medical technologies and shaping health policy. He has published extensively in his major areas of research, which include prenatal genetic testing, cervical cancer screening and prevention, noncancerous uterine conditions management, quality of health care, and racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes. Dr. Washing- ton co-founded UCSF’s Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations in 1993 and served as the director from its establishment through July 2005, was chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences from 1996 to 2004, and also co-founded the UCSF-Stanford Evidence-based Practice Center and served as its first direc- tor from 1997-2002. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences, where he serves on the governing Council of the IOM, and he also currently serves on the Scientific Manage- ment Review Board of the National Institutes of Health. James N. Weinstein, D.O., M.S., is the Dartmouth College Third Century Professor and director of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, professor and chair, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dartmouth Medical School, and vice chair, Board of Governors, Dart- mouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire. He is an internationally renowned spine surgeon and health services researcher. He is a leader in advancing “informed choice” to ensure that patients receive evidence-based, safe, effective, efficient and appropriate care. With Dr. John Wennberg, he established the first-in-the-nation Center for Shared Decision- Making. He also founded the multidisciplinary Spine Center, which has be- come an international model for patient-centered health care delivery, using patient-generated outcomes data to measure and inform clinical practice. He has recently been appointed vice chair of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Board of Governors, with responsibility for oversight of operations for New Hampshire’s only academic medical center, the largest supplier of health services in Northern New England. Dr Weinstein serves on the Institute of Medicine standing committee Social Security Administration Disability Determination, and is on the National Institutes of Health Council for NIAMS, and serves as a director for the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

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