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Appendix C Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides (Seventh Biennial Update) and Staff Biographies Richard A. Fenske, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is a Professor and Associate Chair of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Wash- ington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and is the Director of the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Fenske’s work has focused on the evaluation of environmental health risks in special populations. Specialty areas include health risks of pesticide exposures, development of new exposure assessment methods, children’s exposure to hazardous chemicals, and investigation of the role of der- mal exposure for workers. Dr. Fenske serves on the Science Advisory Board of the US Environmental Protection Agency, and also serves as a member of EPA’s Human Studies Review Board. He had previously served on the committees for Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2002, Update 2004, and Update 2006. Erin M. Bell, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and of Environmental Health Sciences at the State University of New York’s School of Public Health in Albany. She received her undergraduate degree in biology with honors from Hartwick College and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in epidemiology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, respectively. Between her master’s and doctoral studies, she was a Research Associate at IOM’s Medical Follow- up Agency. Her epidemiology research focuses on environmental exposures, particularly to pesticides, especially as they are related to reproductive, immune, and cancer outcomes. Scott W. Burchiel, Ph.D., holds the Nunzio and Sherolyn DeSantis Endowed Chair in Pharmaco-genomics and is Associate Dean for Research at the Univer- 66

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6 APPENDIX C sity of New Mexico (UNM) College of Pharmacy in Albuquerque. He has served at UNM in numerous capacities since receiving his Ph.D. in pharmacology in 1977 from the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine. His continuing research interests include monoclonal antibody production and ra- diolabeled imaging, lymphocyte activation and signal transduction mechanisms, and development of biomarkers for immunotoxicity. He has previously served on NAS committees addressing Beryllium Alloy Exposures and Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene and the subcommittee on jet propulsion fuel 8. Janice Chambers, Ph.D., is a William L. Giles Distinguished Professor and Director at the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, and Professor at the Department of Basic Sciences at Mississippi State University. Dr. Chambers directs several research projects that deal with the effects of pesticides in mam- malian systems to determine the potential human health effects of pesticide ex- posures. Specifically, she leads projects related to the metabolism of pesticides and their neurochemical and behavioral effects in developing organisms to yield predictions about potential effects of pesticides in infants and children. Her other projects are involved in developing mathematical predictions of the effects of mixtures of pesticides on the nervous system so that predictive models can be generated to potentially describe the effects of future uncharacterized mix- tures, and the development of more effective antidotes to nerve agent poisoning. Dr. Chambers has been the principal investigator for numerous federally funded competitive grants in the field of toxicology. Because of her expertise, she has been asked to serve on a number of advisory boards and prestigious committees. Dr. Chambers is board certified as a toxicologist by the American Board of Toxi- cology and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. As Director of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, she has developed an interdisciplinary research center specializing in pesticide toxicology and funded primarily by NIH. The center comprises the areas of neurotoxicology, biochemical toxicology, analytical chemistry, biostatistics, epidemiology, computational chemistry, computational simulation, biochemistry, and endocrinology. Dr. Chambers is a member of the EPA FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel, the EPA Human Studies Review Board, and the NCEH/ATSDR Board of Scientific Counselors. Naihua Duan, Ph.D., M.A., is a Professor of Biostatistics at Columbia Univer- sity and Director of the Division of Biostatistics at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City. He received a B.S. in mathematics from National Taiwan University, an M.A. in mathematical statistics from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. His primary research interest is study design, particularly for investigations with multilevel data structures. He previously served on the NAS committees on Advances in Assessing Human Exposure to Airborne Pollutants, Organ Procurement and Transplantation Policy, Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Ar-

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68 VETERANS AND AGENT ORANGE: UPDATE 2008 eas, and Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research. Peter H. Gann, M.D., Sc.D., is a Professor and Director of Pathology Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. A physician-epidemiologist by training, his research work focuses on the causes of breast and prostate cancer, with par- ticular emphasis on the development and application of novel biological markers. His interest in biological markers actually originates with his service as a Project Director at the National Academy of Sciences in the 1980s. Prior to his current position, Dr. Gann spent 13 years in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Medical School. He received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore College, M.D. and M.S. (epidemiology/biostatistics) degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, and his doctorate in epidemiology from Harvard University. Dr. Gann serves on a number of national and international advisory and peer review panels in the field of cancer prevention. He previously served on the committee for Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Mark S. Goldberg, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, associate member in the Joint Departments of Epidemiol- ogy and Biostatistics and Occupational Health, the Department of Oncology, and Medical Scientist, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre. Dr. Goldberg is an occupational and environmental epidemiologist and holds an Investigator Award from the Canadian Institute for Health Research. His current research interests include the investigation of occupational and environmental risk factors for breast cancer and the health effects associated with exposures to ambient air pollution. In addition to being a member of grant review panels, Dr. Goldberg is also a member of Health Canada’s Science Advisory Board. He has served on the committee for Disposition of the Air Force Health Study; the Division of Earth and Life Sciences (DELS) committee for Assessing the Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene: Key Scientific Issues; and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Nancy I. Kerkvliet, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon. Dr. Kerkvliet’s research is focused on using animal models to understand how chemi- cals of environmental concern alter immune function. Her primary interest is focused on understanding how activation of the Ah receptor by TCDD and other ligands suppresses immune responses. She previously served on the Committee on Toxicology, the Subcommittee of Jet Propulsion Fuel 8, and the committee for Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2004 and Update 2006. Stephen B. Kritchevsky, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is Professor of Internal Medicine in the Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine and Director of the J. Paul

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69 APPENDIX C Sticht Center on Aging and Rehabilitation at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, NC. After receiving both his M.S.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, he joined the Departments of Biostatistics and of Epidemiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Dr. Kritchevsky’s research interests are related to conditions compromising the health of aging populations, particularly inflam- mation, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Michele Marcus, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental and Occupational Health of Emory University in Atlanta. She is also Director of Graduate studies for the Department of Epidemiology and a Fellow with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Previously, she was a faculty member in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medi- cine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. She received her M.P.H., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University and her research interests include environmental and genetic contributions to reproduction and investigation of the human health effects of endocrine disruptors. She is also a member of the Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit. Linda A. McCauley, Ph.D., FAAN, R.N., is Dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing in Atlanta. She was previously the Associ- ate Dean for Research and the Nightingale Professor in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Dr. McCauley received her doctoral degree in environmental health/epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. McCauley has special expertise in the design of epidemiological investigations of occupational and environmental hazards and is nationally recognized for her expertise in occupational and environmental health nursing. Dr. McCauley’s re- search interests are in the areas of chemical exposure among working populations and young children. Dr. McCauley is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She previously served on the committees for Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Alvaro Puga, Ph.D., is a Professor of Molecular Biology and Environmental Health, Deputy Director of the NIEHS Center for Environmental Genetics, and Associate Director of the Superfund Basic Research Program at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. Following studies of biology at Universidad de Madrid, Spain, and of molecular cytogenetics at the University of Lund, Sweden, he received a Ph.D. in molecular biology and biophysics from Purdue Univer- sity. Before going to the University of Cincinnati, Dr. Puga served for 15 years in several capacities at NIH in the Institute of Dental Research and the Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Study of the AH receptor has been a major theme of his research. He recently served on the NRC committee that reviewed EPA’s exposure and human health assessment of dioxin.

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680 VETERANS AND AGENT ORANGE: UPDATE 2008 Jeremy Shefner, M.D., Ph.D., is a Professor and Chair of Neurology at Upstate Medical University, and Director of the Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory and the MDA/ALS Research and Treatment Center at University Hospital, in Syracuse, New York. He is trained in neurology and clinical neurophysiology, and has devoted his clinical and research efforts to ALS. After receiving an M.D. with distinction from Northwestern University, he completed residency and fellowship training in neurology and clinical neurophysiology at the Harvard-Longwood Neurological training program. After fellowship, he joined the faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. While at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dr. Shefner directed the ALS Clinic and participated in multiple industry-sponsored ALS clinical trials. He founded the Northeast ALS Clinical Trials Consortium in 1995, which has grown to become the largest ALS clinical trials group in North America. Since moving to Syracuse, he established the multidisciplinary ALS clinic there, and continues to hold leadership positions in both industry- and investigator-initiated clinical trials. Dr. Shefner is the recipi- ent of numerous research grants from NIH and industry sponsors, as well as the author of more than 100 original research articles and book chapters on neuro- physiology. Dr. Shefner previously served the IOM Committee on the Review of Scientific Literature on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Veterans. Hollie I. Swanson, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mo- lecular and Biomedical Pharmacology with a joint position with the Toxicology Department at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. She received her M.S. from Oregon State University, Ph.D. from Purdue University, and post- doctoral training from Michigan State University and Northwestern University. Her research focuses on the study of the aryl hydrocarbon pathway and its role in altering cell fate. She currently serves as Councilor of the Drug Metabolism Spe- cialty Section of the National Chapter of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and she is a member of the National and Ohio Valley Chapters of the Society of Toxicology. She is an editorial board member of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Dr. Swanson has published numerous articles pertaining to the molecular and cellular aspects of the AH receptor and dioxin. She previously served on the committee for Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Staff Mary Burr Paxton, Ph.D., is a Senior Program Officer in the Institute of Medi- cine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Before joining IOM, she worked as a consultant on the regulation of toxic substances and managed the conduct and analysis of several epidemiology studies on veterans’ health. She received a master’s of science in biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and a doctorate in genetics from the George Wash-

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681 APPENDIX C ington University. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. Dr. Paxton has worked on several National Academies reports, including Issues in Risk Assessment; Enironmental Neurotoxicology; Gulf War and Health: Insec- ticides and Solents; Gulf War and Health: Fuels, Combustion Products, and Propellants; Asbestos: Selected Cancers; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2004, and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Jennifer A. Cohen, M.P.H., is a Program Officer in the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. She has been involved with the IOM committees that produced Organ Procurement and Transplantation; Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures; Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000; Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in the Children of Vietnam Veterans; Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2004; and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., is Director of the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Before joining the IOM, she was Senior Health Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she studied the effects of health-system change on the public-health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health-care workforce. Dr. Martinez is former Assistant Director for Health Financing and Policy with the US General Accounting Office, for which she directed evaluations and policy analysis on national and public-health issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Tia S. Carter is a Senior Program Assistant in the IOM Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. In December 2008, she graduated with her masters in health-care administration from the University of Maryland Uni- versity College. She received her undergraduate degree in community health from the University of Maryland, College Park. Before coming to the IOM, she worked at the Greater Washington Urban League in the Division of Aging and Health Services as the Health Promotions Coordinator, where she was responsible for health-promotion and disease-prevention education services and activities among the elderly. She has been involved with the IOM committees on Asbestos: Selected Cancers, Veterans and Agent Orange: Updates 2004, and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2006. Norman Grossblatt, ELS(D), is a Senior Editor at the National Academies. Be- fore joining the National Research Council Division of Medical Sciences in 1963, he worked as an analyst in information storage and retrieval at Documentation Incorporated and as a technical editor at the Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co., Nuclear Power Department, in Washington, DC. He received a B.A. in English

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682 VETERANS AND AGENT ORANGE: UPDATE 2008 from Haverford College. Mr. Grossblatt is a diplomate editor in the life sciences and was the founding president of the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Medical Writers Association and a recipient of its President’s Award; a member of the Council of Science Editors and since 1997 the manuscript editor of its journal, Science Editor; and a member of the Euro- pean Association of Science Editors. At the National Academies, he has edited over 300 reports.