Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Ruth A. David, NAE, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of Analytic Services, Inc., a nonprofit research institute focusing on national security, homeland security, and public safety issues. She initiated a corporate focus on homeland security in 1999 and established the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security early in 2001; today the corporation operates the Homeland Security Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security, in addition to the ANSER business unit. Before assuming her current position in 1998, Dr. David was deputy director for science and technology at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). As technical advisor to the director of central intelligence, she was responsible for research, development, and deployment of technologies in support of all phases of the intelligence process. Dr. David is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and currently serves on the NAE Council as well as several committees of the National Research Council (NRC); she chairs the NRC Standing Committee on Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER). She is a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, first established to advise the president and now advising the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. She also serves on the National Security Agency Advisory Board, the Hertz Foundation Board, and the Wichita State University Foundation National Advisory Committee and is a member of the Draper Corporation. Previously, Dr. David served in several leadership positions at the Sandia National Laboratories, where she began her professional career in 1975. Dr. David received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Wichita State University, and a master of science degree and a doctorate in electrical engineering from Stanford University.



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Ruth A. David, NAE, Chair, is president and chief executive officer of Analytic Services, Inc., a nonprofit research institute focusing on national security, home - land security, and public safety issues. She initiated a corporate focus on homeland security in 1999 and established the ANSER Institute for Homeland Security early in 2001; today the corporation operates the Homeland Security Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security, in addition to the ANSER business unit. Before assum- ing her current position in 1998, Dr. David was deputy director for science and technology at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). As technical advisor to the director of central intelligence, she was responsible for research, develop- ment, and deployment of technologies in support of all phases of the intelligence process. Dr. David is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and currently serves on the NAE Council as well as several committees of the National Research Council (NRC); she chairs the NRC Standing Committee on Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER). She is a member of the Homeland Security Advisory Council, first established to advise the president and now advising the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. She also serves on the National Security Agency Advisory Board, the Hertz Foundation Board, and the Wichita State University Foundation National Advisory Commit - tee and is a member of the Draper Corporation. Previously, Dr. David served in several leadership positions at the Sandia National Laboratories, where she began her professional career in 1975. Dr. David received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from Wichita State University, and a master of science degree and a doctorate in electrical engineering from Stanford University. 

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER Steven R.j. brueck is the director of the Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM) and is a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, physics, and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages research and education at the boundaries of two disciplines. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are Si-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for Si manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He is a member of the American Physical Society and the Materials Research Society and is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Optical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Ann N. Campbell is currently acting director for Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Strategic Thrust. In this role, she provides leadership and coordination for the laboratory strategy and engagement in the national cyber challenge. Dr. Campbell received a B.S. degree in materials engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics (materials science con - centration) from Harvard University. At Sandia, Dr. Campbell has served as senior manager for the Assessment Technologies Group in the Information Systems Analysis Center, where her responsibilities included leadership for a broad range of technical activities focused on vulnerability assessments and the development of national security solutions in information technology for multiple government sponsors. Most recently, she was the deputy for technical programs for Sandia’s Defense Systems and Assessment Strategic Management Unit. Dr. Campbell is a senior member of the IEEE and is affiliated with the IEEE Reliability and Electron Devices Societies. She was a member of the IEEE Reliability Society Administra- tion Committee from 1999 to 2004 and served as vice president of membership for the society. Dr. Campbell has served on the Management Committee and Board of Directors for the IEEE International Reliability Symposium. Stephen W. Drew, NAE, holds consultancies with a variety of pharmaceutical and biotechnology organizations and is a founder and principal of Science Partners LLC. Until 2000, he worked with Merck & Company, Inc., in a series of increas - ingly responsible positions culminating with distinguished senior scientist. He was vice president of Vaccine Science and Technology, vice president of Vaccine Operations, and vice president of Technical Operations and Engineering. Prior to joining the Merck Manufacturing Division in 1987, he was the senior director of Biochemical Engineering in the Merck Research Laboratories (MRL), a depart- ment that he started in 1981. Dr. Drew received his Ph.D. in biochemical engi- neering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Drew is member of

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 APPENDIX B the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He has served in several capacities within the NAE and assisted numerous National Research Council committees. He was chair of the advisory committee to the Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation. john gannon is vice president for Global Analysis, a business area within BAE Systems. Dr. Gannon joined BAE Systems after serving as staff director of the House Homeland Security Committee, the first new committee established by Congress in more than 30 years. In 2002-2003, he was a team leader in the White House’s Transitional Planning Office for the Department of Homeland Security. He served previously in the senior-most analytic positions in the intelligence com - munity, including as the CIA’s director of European analysis, deputy director for intelligence, chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production. In the private sector, he devel- oped the analytic workforce for Intellibridge Corporation, a Web-based provider of outsourced analysis for government and corporate clients. Dr. Gannon served as a naval officer in Southeast Asia and later in several naval reserve commands, retiring as a captain. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, and master’s and doctoral degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He is an adjunct professor in the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. Sharon C. glotzer received her B.S. in physics from UCLA in 1987 and her Ph.D. in physics from Boston University in 1993. Under an NRC Postdoctoral Fellowship and then as a member of the technical staff, she worked at NIST as a physicist in the Polymers Division of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, and co-founded and directed the Center for Theoretical and Com - putational Materials Science. She moved to the University of Michigan in 2001 as an associate professor with tenure and is now a professor of chemical engi - neering and materials science and engineering, with a courtesy appointment in physics. She also holds the titles of professor of applied physics (and serves on the executive committee) and professor of macromolecular science and engineering, and is a faculty affiliate in the University of Michigan’s Center for Theoretical Physics, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, Center for Computational Medicine and Biology, the University of Michigan branch of the Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter (for which she serves on the steering committee) and the Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences (for which she serves on the executive board). Her research focuses on computational nanoscience and computer simulation of soft matter, self-assembly, and materials design and is sponsored by NSF, DOE, NASA, AFOSR, and the McDonnell Foundation. She has published more than 130 papers in such journals as Science, Nature, Nature Physics, Nature Materials, Physical Reiew Letters, Nano Letters and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and she has presented

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER more than 180 invited and keynote presentations around the world, including six named lectures at universities in the United States and Canada. She has received numerous awards and honors, including the American Physical Society’s Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engi - neers (PECASE) and the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal, and she was a Sigma Xi Lecturer. Her efforts in research, teaching, and service have been recog - nized at the University of Michigan by the Rackham Faculty Recognition Award, College of Engineering’s Monroe-Brown Foundation Research Excellence Award, and Department of Chemical Engineering’s Departmental Excellence Award. She is the 2008 recipient of the Charles M.A. Stine Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineering and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and is a Department of Defense National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow. Christopher C. green is the assistant dean for Asia Pacific of the Wayne State University School of Medicine (SOM) in Beijing, China. He is also a clinical fellow in neuroimaging/MRI in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences of the SOM and the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). His medical specialties are brain imaging, forensic medicine and toxicology, and neurophysiology, and his personal medi- cal practice is in the differential diagnoses of neurodegenerative disease. He has served and continues to serve on many government advisory groups and private sector corporate boards of directors. Immediately prior to his current position, he was executive director for emergent technology research for the SOM/DMC. From 1985 through 2004 he was executive director, Global Technology Policy, and chief technology officer for General Motors’ Asia-Pacific Operations. His career at General Motors included positions as head, Biomedical Sciences Research, and executive director, General Motors Research Laboratory for Materials and Environmental Sciences. His distinguished career with the CIA extended from 1969 to 1985 as a senior division analyst and assistant national intelligence officer for science and technology. His Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado Medical School in neurophysiology, and his M.D. is from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas/Monterey, Mexico, with honors. He also holds the National Intelligence Medal and is a fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Leslie greengard, NAS/NAE, is the director of the Courant Institute of Math- ematical Sciences at New York University, where he is a professor of mathematics and computer science. Dr. Greengard received his B.A. in mathematics from Wesleyan University in 1979, followed by an M.D. and a Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University in 1987. He joined the faculty of the Mathematics Department at the Courant Institute in 1989. Dr. Greengard’s research is largely concerned with the development of fast and adaptive algorithms for computational

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 APPENDIX B problems in biology, chemistry, materials science, medicine, and physics. One such algorithm is the fast multipole method (FMM), developed during the 1980s with V. Rokhlin, which is now widely used in electromagnetics, astrophysics, molecular simulations, and fluid dynamics. He currently works on protein design, the analysis of “metamaterials,” diffusion in complex geometry, and reconstruc - tion methods for magnetic resonance imaging. Dr. Greengard has been an NSF Presidential Young Investigator and a Packard Foundation Fellow. He received the Leroy P. Steele Prize from the American Mathematical Society in 2001 and the Sokol Faculty Award in the Sciences from New York University in 2004. In 2006, he was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Diane E. griffin, IOM/NAS, is professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology and director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned a biology degree from Augustana College in 1962, followed by M.D. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) degrees from Stanford University. She interned at Stanford University Hospital between 1968 and 1970, before beginning her career at Johns Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious disease in 1970. After completing her postdoctoral work, she was named an assistant professor of medicine and neurology. Since then, she has held the posi - tions of associate professor, professor, and now professor and chair. She served as an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1973 to 1979. Dr. Griffin’s research interests include alphaviruses and acute encephalitis. She is also working on the effect of measles virus infection, and immune activation in response to infection, on immune responses in tissue culture and in infected humans at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, zambia. In zambia, she and her colleagues are examining the effect of HIV infection on measles and measles virus immunization. Dr. Griffin is the principal investigator on a variety of grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foun - dation, and the Dana Foundation. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, the author or co-author of a more than 300 scholarly papers and articles, and the past president of the American Society for Virology, the Association of Medical School Microbiology Chairs, and the American Society for Microbiology. j.C. Herz is a technologist with a background in biological systems and computer game design. She is the founder of Batchtags, Inc. Her specialty is massively multiplayer systems that leverage social network effects, whether on the Web, mobile devices, or more exotic high-end or grubby low-end hardware. She cur- rently serves as a White House special consultant to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Networks and Information Integration). Defense projects range from aerospace systems to a computer-game-derived interface for next-generation

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0 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER unmanned air systems. She is one of the three co-authors of OSD’s Open Technol- ogy Development roadmap. Ms. Herz serves on the Federal Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation’s education directorate. In that capacity, she is helping NSF harness emerging technologies to drive U.S. competitiveness in math and science. She was a member of the NRC Committee on IT and Creative Practice and is currently a fellow of Columbia University’s American Assembly, where she is on the leadership team of the Assembly’s Next Generation Project. In 2002, she was designated a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. She is a member of the Global Business Network, a founding member of the IEEE Task Force on Game Technologies, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the advisory board of Carnegie Mellon’s ETC Press. She graduated from Harvard with a B.A. in biology and environmental studies, magna cum laude, in 1993. She is the author of two books, Surfing on the Internet (Little Brown, 1994) and Joystick Nation: How Videogames Ate Our Quarters, Won Our Hearts, and Rewired Our Minds (Little Brown, 1997), a his- tory of videogames that traces the cultural and technological evolution of the first medium that was born digital, and how it shaped the minds of a generation weaned on Nintendo. Her books have been translated into seven languages. As a New York Times columnist, she published 100 essays on the grammar and syntax of game design between 1998 and 2000. She has also contributed to Esther Dyson’s Release .0 and to Rolling Stone, Wired, GQ, and the Calgary Philatelist. j. jerome Holton is a senior systems engineer with the Tauri Group working in support of the BioWatch Systems Program Office of the Department of Homeland Security. Previously he served as senior vice president and chief technology officer for ARES Systems Group, LLC, where he focused on the fielding of information operations tools, enhancing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capa - bilities to detect and defeat improvised explosive devices, and the development of applique armor solutions to counter explosively formed penetrators. Dr. Holton was previously an associate with Booz Allen Hamilton, where he led the techni- cal support team for the Explosives Division within the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate. Prior to that, he served as the director of technical research, analyses, and communications for Defense Group, Inc., where he was responsible for the company’s branding, strategic planning, and positioning in the government support sector, including policy, technology, and operations issues for weapons of mass destruction and their effects on civil - ian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. He has been involved in defense and energy programs related to the counterproliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness for, and the detection, identification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. He has provided advice and counsel to senior decision makers in the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biological Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction

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 APPENDIX B Agency, and the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Depart - ment of Homeland Security. Dr. Holton has previously served as a member of the NRC Committee on Defense Intelligence Agency Technology Forecasts and Reviews and the Committee on Alternative Technologies to Replace Antiperson - nel Landmines. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in experimental physics from Duke University. Frederick R. Lopez had a 36-year career as an engineer with McDonnell-Douglas Aircraft Company and Raytheon Company. He is also a retired brigadier general, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Recently retired, he was the director of engineering for Raytheon Electronic Warfare Systems in Goleta, California. General Lopez was responsible for the management of all engineering personnel in support of operational and support programs in electronic warfare systems and for the implementation of engineering processes and process improvement activities within the engineering discipline. Highlights in his Marine Corps career include a tour of duty in Vietnam, service as an Infantry Officer with Master Parachutist Qualification, and a secondary Military Occupational Specialty of Forward Air Controller (FAC). He has held billets as company XO, company commander, battalion XO, battalion CO, FAC, and naval gunfire team leader, brigade platoon leader, ANGLICO operations officer, regimental operations officer, assistant division commander, commanding general, 4th Marine Division. He served 3 years on active duty and 28 years in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. General Lopez received a B.S. degree in mathematics from California State Polytechnic College and an M.S. in computer science from West Coast University, Orange, California. gilman g. Louie is a partner of Alsop Louie Partners, a venture capital fund focusing on the development of great technology entrepreneurs. Prior to this posi - tion he was president and CEO of In-Q-Tel, a venture capital group helping to deliver new technologies to the CIA and intelligence community. Before helping found In-Q-Tel, Louie served as Hasbro Interactive’s chief creative officer and as general manager of the Games.com Group, where he was responsible for creat- ing and implementing the business plan for Hasbro’s Internet games site. Prior to joining Hasbro, he served as chief executive of the Nexa Corporation, Sphere, Inc., Spectrum HoloByte, Inc., and Microprose, Inc. As a pioneer in the interac - tive entertainment industry, Gilman’s successes have included the Falcon, F-16 flight simulator, and Tetris, which he brought over from the Soviet Union. Louie has served on the board of directors of Wizards of the Coast, Total Entertainment Network, Direct Language, and FASA Interactive. He was an active member of the Markle Foundation Task Force on National Security and the Information Age. julie j.C.H. Ryan is president of Wyndrose Technical Group and an associ- ate professor of engineering management and systems engineering at George

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER Washington University. She holds a B.S. degree in humanities from the U.S. Air Force Academy, an M.L.S. in technology from Eastern Michigan University, and a D.Sc. in engineering management from the George Washington University. Dr. Ryan began her career as an intelligence officer, serving the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, working in a series of increasingly responsible positions throughout her distinguished career. Her areas of interest are in information security and information warfare research, and she has conducted several research projects and written articles and book chapters in her focus area. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board from 1995 to 1998. Dr. Ryan is the treasurer and a member of the Board of Directors for the Colloquium on Information Systems Security Education. james b. Smith is the international business development executive for Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems in Tewksbury, Massachusetts. Prior to this appoint - ment, Brig Gen Smith served as vice president of government business for Raytheon Aircraft Company. Previously, he was vice president of the Precision Engagement Strategic Business Area for Raytheon in Tucson, Arizona. Before joining Raytheon, he served as the director of Navy Command and Control Systems for Lockheed Martin. Smith had a distinguished military career, retiring from the U.S. Air Force as a brigadier general in October 2002. As the deputy commander and commander of the Joint Warfighting Center, U.S. Joint Forces Command, Joint Training Analysis and Simulation Center, he was responsible for managing the joint force exercise and training development program. His aviation career includes 4,000 hours in the F-15 and T-38, including combat sorties dur- ing Desert Storm. Among his responsibilities during his military career was the command of the 94th Tactical Fighter Squadron and the 325th Operations Group. Later he served as commander of the 18th Wing at kadena Air Base, Japan. His staff postings included a variety of joint and coalition assignments including the deputy for operations, North American Air Defense Command (NORAD), and professor of national security strategy at the National War College. Brig Gen Smith is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy (B.S., military history) and Indiana University (M.A., history). He is also a distinguished gradu - ate of Air Command and Staff College, the Naval War College, and the National War College. Dianne S. Wiley, a Boeing technical fellow for structures and materials technol- ogy, is the innovation advocate for technology insertion into space exploration systems. She is the liaison between the Space Exploration Systems office and the Boeing Technical Fellowship. She recently left the Missile Defense National Team, where she was responsible for international coordination of Defense of Deployed Forces, Friends, and Allies. In addition to managing proposal strategy and execution for the enterprise, she also serves as the enterprise liaison to the Boeing Technical Fellowship to facilitate technology maturation and technology

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 APPENDIX B transition to the space exploration systems business area. Previously, Dr. Wiley was assigned to the Missile Defense National Team, responsible for international missile defense activities for defense of friends and allies and defense of U.S. deployed forces. In her prior assignment with Boeing Phantom Works, she was the program manager for airframe technology on the NASA Space Launch Initiative Program, overseeing the development and demonstration of advanced structure and materials technology for next-generation reusable launch vehicles. Previ- ously, she was with Northrop Grumman for 20 years, where she was manager of Airframe Technology. In that position, Dr. Wiley was responsible for research and development and technology transition in structural design and analysis, materials and processes, and manufacturing technology. During that time, she was respon - sible for transitioning airframe core technologies into three new business areas (space, biomedicine, and surface ships) to offset declines in traditional business. Before that, she served as a senior technical specialist on the B-2 program. Dr. Wiley was responsible for developing and implementing innovative structural solutions to ensure the structural integrity of the B-2 aircraft. Dr. Wiley’s 25 years of technical experience have involved durability and damage tolerance, advanced composites (organic and ceramic), high-temperature structures, smart structures, low-observable structures, concurrent engineering, and rapid prototyping. Dr. Wiley holds a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from UCLA School of Engineering and Applied Science. She attended Defense Systems Management College (1996). She is a graduate of the Center for Creative Leadership (1995), Leadership Cali - fornia Class of 1998, and the Boeing Leadership Center (2002).