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  • Table L-4 As Selected Assumptions Used in School Meals Menu Analysis Program Modified Baseline Menus, Elementary School Lunch

  • Table L-5 As Selected Assumptions Used in School Meals Menu Analysis Program Modified Baseline Menus, Middle School Lunch

  • Table L-6 As Selected Assumptions Used in School Meals Menu Analysis Program Modified Baseline Menus, High School Lunch

  • Table L-7 As Selected Assumptions Used in School Meals Menu Analysis Program Modified Baseline Menus with Increased Fruit and Vegetable Intake

  • Table L-8A Elementary School Breakfast: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-8B Elementary School Breakfast: Modified Baseline Menu

  • Table L-9A Middle School Breakfast: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-9B Middle School Breakfast: Modified Baseline Menu

  • Table L-10A High School Breakfast: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-10B High School Breakfast: Modified Baseline Menu

  • Table L-11A Elementary School Lunch: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-11B Elementary School Lunch: Modified Baseline Menu

  • Table L-12A Middle School Lunch: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-12B Middle School Lunch: Modified Baseline Menu

  • Table L-13A High School Lunch: Representative Baseline Menu

  • Table L-13B High School Lunch: Modified Baseline Menu

PROCESS FOR SELECTING THE REPRESENTATIVE BASELINE MENUS

  • Using SNDA-III data, limit the sample to schools that provided menus for 5 days.1

  • Eliminate outliers—schools that served meals with calorie or nutrient content that was less than the 5th percentile or more than the 95th percentile.2

1

SNDA-III collected data for a full school week. Most schools provided data for 5 days; however, because of holidays and other school closures, some schools provided data for only 3 or 4 days.

2

Outliers were defined based on meal (breakfast or lunch), school level (elementary, middle, or high), and menu planning method (nutrient- or food-based). Nutrients considered (protein, vitamins A and C, calcium, and iron) were those specified in existing School Meals Initiative regulations. Initially, more rigorous specifications had been set for nutrient content, but the results were not usable because of a large number of cells with only zero or one menu set.



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