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APPENDIX C Panel on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change: Biographical Sketches Katharine L. Jacobs* (Chair through January 3, 2010) is a Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science and an Associate Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Sustainability of Arid Region Hydrology and Riparian Areas at the University of Arizona. She is affiliated with the recently established Institute of the Environment, working on climate adaptation and water management issues. For the past 3 years, Jacobs was the Executive Director of the Arizona Water Institute, a consortium of the three state universities focused on water-related research, education, and technology transfer in support of water supply sustainability. She has more than 20 years of experience as a water manager for the State of Arizona Department of Water Resources, including 14 years as director of the Tucson Active Management Area. Her research interests include water policy, connect- ing science and decision making, stakeholder engagement, use of climate information for water management applications, climate-change adaptation, and drought plan- ning. Ms. Jacobs earned her M.L.A. in environmental planning from the University of California, Berkeley. She was the author of the water sector chapter for the first Na- tional Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change, and a convening lead author of the Climate Change Science Program’s report Decision­Support Experiments for Water Resources. She has served on eight National Research Council panels. She recently testified in the U.S. Senate, providing recommendations on the design of the National Climate Service. Thomas J. Wilbanks (Chair) is a Corporate Research Fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and leads the Laboratory’s Global Change and Developing Country Pro- grams. A past president of the Association of American Geographers, he conducts research on such issues as sustainable development, energy and environmental technology and policy, responses to global climate change, and the role of geographi- cal scale in all of these regards. Wilbanks has won the James R. Anderson Medal of Asterisks (*) denote members who resigned during the study process. 

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APPENDIX C Honor in Applied Geography; has been awarded Honors by the Association of Ameri- can Geographers, geography’s highest honor; was named Distinguished Geography Educator of the year in 1993 by the National Geographic Society; and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Co-edited recent books include Global Change and Local Places (2003), Geographical Dimensions of Terrorism (2003), and Bridging Scales and Knowledge Systems: Linking Global Science and Local Knowledge (2006). Wilbanks is Chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Com- mittee on Human Dimensions of Global Change and a member of a number of other National Academy of Sciences (NAS)/NRC boards and panels. In recent years, he has been coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report, Working Group II, Chapter 7 (Industry, Settlement, and Society); coordinating lead author for the Climate Change Science Program’s Syn- thesis and Assessment Product (SAP) 4.5 (Effects of Climate Change on Energy Produc­ tion and Use in the United States); and lead author for one of three sections (Effects of Global Change on Human Settlements) of SAP 4.6 (Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems). Wilbanks received his B.A. degree in social sci- ences from Trinity University in 1960 and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Syracuse University in 1967 and 1969. bruce baughman, for more than three decades, has served in key federal and state emergency management positions for some of the largest natural and man-made disasters ever to hit the United States and its territories, including 13 hurricanes, the Oklahoma City bombing, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He has testified before Congress on emergency management issues more than 25 times. As director of the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, he led the state’s response to three hurricanes—Ivan in 2004 and Dennis and Katrina in 2005—and a deadly series of tornadoes in March of 2007. Prior to his appointment by the governor of Alabama, Mr. Baughman held several key positions at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), including Director of the Office of National Preparedness and Direc- tor of Operations. While at FEMA, he directed response operations for more than 110 presidential disaster and emergency declarations, including hurricanes, earthquakes, bombings, and flooding. He retired from the Department of Homeland Security as one of FEMA’s top senior executives in 2003. Mr. Baughman is the recipient of numerous national awards, including FEMA’s Distinguished Service Award, four FEMA Meritori- ous Service Awards, the National Hurricane Conference’s Distinguished Service Award and the Neil Frank Award, and the President’s Council on Year 2000 Gold Medal. He is a past president of the National Emergency Management Association. Mr. Baughman is currently Senior Consultant for Emergency Management and Homeland Security to Innovative Emergency Management, Inc. 

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Appendix C Roger N. beachy* is the founding president of the not-for-profit Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, Missouri, a position he has held since January 1999. In this role, Dr. Beachy has been responsible for developing and implementing the Danforth Center’s strategic direction, recruiting its staff, and formulating its research programs. Dr. Beachy, a member of the NAS, is internationally known for his ground- breaking research on developing virus-resistant plants through biotechnology. He was a member of the Biology Department at Washington University in St. Louis from 1978 to 1991, where he was Professor and Director of the Center for Plant Science and Biotechnology. His work at Washington University, in collaboration with Monsanto Company, led to the development of the world’s first genetically modified food crop, a variety of tomato that was modified for resistance to virus disease. His technique to produce virus resistance in tomatoes has been replicated by researchers around the world to produce many types of plants with resistance to a number of different virus diseases. Research under Dr. Beachy’s direction has led to a number of patent appli- cations. He has edited or contributed to 50 book articles, and his work has produced more than 220 journal publications. georges C. benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.E.P. (E), is well known in the world of public health as a leader, practitioner, and administrator. Benjamin has been the executive director of the American Public Health Association, the nation’s oldest and largest or- ganization of public health professionals, since December 2002. He came to that post from his position as secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hy- giene, where he played a key role in the expansion and improvement of the Maryland Medicaid program. Benjamin became secretary of the Maryland health department in April 1999, following 4 years as its deputy secretary for public health services. Benja- min, of Gaithersburg, Maryland, is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine and a fellow of the American College of Physicians; he is also a Fellow Emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians. James L. buizer is Science Policy Advisor to the President at Arizona State Univer- sity (ASU) and Director for Strategic Institutional Transformation in the Office of the President. He also serves as Director of the University Center for Integrated Solu- tions to Climate Challenges and Professor of Practice in Climate Adaptation Policy & Institutional Design in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning. Mr. Buizer advances ASU by providing leadership and strategic advice on a broad range of topics. Upon arriving at ASU in September 2003 until July 2007, he served as founding Executive Director of the Office of Sustainability Initiatives in the Office of the Presi- dent, where he led the conceptualization, design, and initiation of the university-wide Global Institute of Sustainability and its School of Sustainability, launched in fall 2006. 

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APPENDIX C He serves on numerous leadership boards and advisory councils across the university. In his personal capacity he serves on the Board of Directors at the National Council for Science and the Environment; on the Board of Directors of Second Nature, Inc.; on the Board of Trustees of the Tesseract School in Paradise Valley, Arizona; on the Advisory Committee of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment; and as Strategic Advisor to Pegasus Capital Advisors, L.P. Prior to this, he served as Director of the Climate and Societal Interactions Office at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Washington, D.C. In this capacity Jim coor- dinated the U.S. government technical review of the 2000 Assessment Report of the Working Group on Impacts of Climate Change of the IPCC. Mr. Buizer has presented and published extensively on institutionalizing the science-to-action interface. He received his degrees in oceanography, marine resource economics, and science policy from the University of Washington, Seattle. F. Stuart Chapin III focuses his research on ecosystem ecology and on the resilience of social-ecological systems. His ecological research addresses the consequences of plant traits for ecosystem and global processes, particularly vegetation effects on nu- trient cycling, fire regime, and biodiversity. He also studies vegetation-mediated feed- backs to high-latitude climate warming, as mediated by changes in water and energy exchange. Dr. Chapin’s research on social-ecological systems emphasizes the resilience of northern regions to recent changes in climate and fire regime. This research entails studies of human and climatic effects on fire regime; the resulting effects on ecosys- tem services, wages, and cultural integrity; and the effects of local opinions about fire and national fire policy on the fire policies developed and implemented at regional scales. Most of his current research focuses on Alaska and eastern Siberia. Dr. Chapin has served on numerous NRC committees and is a member of NAS. W. Peter Cherry is Chief Analyst at Science Applications International Corporation, where his research interests include the design, development, and test and evaluation of large-scale systems with emphasis on network centricity. A member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), he has focused on the development and application of operations research in the national security domain, primarily in the field of land combat. He contributed to the development and fielding of most of the major sys- tems currently employed by the Army, ranging from the Patriot Missile System to the Apache helicopter, as well as the command control and intelligence systems currently in use. In addition, he contributed to the creation of the Army’s Manpower Person- nel and Human Factors and Training Program and to the Army’s Embedded Training Initiative. Dr. Cherry is a member of the Board on Army Science and Technology, served on the Army Science Board, and for the past 10 years has participated in independent reviews of the Army’s Science and Technology programs. 0

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Appendix C braxton Davis is the Director of the Policy and Planning Division for South Carolina’s Coastal Zone Management Program, where he leads long-term state policy initiatives focused on shoreline change, ocean resources, and coastal trends analysis. For the past 6 years, he has also worked with NOAA and the Coastal States Organization (CSO) on several national studies related to coastal and ocean policy issues. As a delegate for the state of South Carolina, he currently serves as vice chair of CSO, and he previously served as chair of a Climate Change Work Group that brings coastal states’ perspec- tives on climate change research and policy needs to the federal government. He has provided congressional testimony on climate change issues and continues to serve on several interagency committees to improve federal, state, and local coordination on coastal issues and climate change. Dr. Davis earned a B.S. degree in environmental sci- ences from the University of Virginia, an M.S. degree in biological sciences from Florida International University, and a Ph.D. in marine affairs from the University of Rhode Island. Kristie L. Ebi is Executive Director of the Technical Support Unit for Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability) of the IPCC. Prior to this position, she was an independent consultant researching the impacts of and adaptation to climate change for extreme events, thermal stress, foodborne safety and security, and vector-borne diseases. She has worked with the World Health Organization, the United Nations De- velopment Programme, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and others on implementing adaptation measures in low-income countries. She facilitated adaptation assessments for the health sector for the states of Maryland and Alaska. She was a lead author on the “Human Health” chapter of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, and the “Human Health” chapter for the U.S. Synthesis and Assessment Product “Analyses of the Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems.” She has edited four books on aspects of climate change and has more than 80 publications. Dr. Ebi’s scientific training includes an M.S. in toxicology and a Ph.D. and a master’s of public health in epidemiology, and 2 years of postgraduate research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Jeremy Harris served for more than 10 years as the Mayor of the City and County of Honolulu, Hawaii, the 12th largest city in the United States. He retired in January of 2005. Prior to becoming mayor, he was Honolulu’s longest serving managing director, a position he held for almost 9 years. Under his leadership, Honolulu received the Gold Award as the most livable large city in the world. Mayor Harris is the only individual to receive the award of Public Administrator of the Year for two consecutive years from the American Association of Public Administrators in Hawaii. He has served on the board of directors of the national American Institute of Architects, as Irving Dis- tinguished Professor at Ball State University, and as visiting senior faculty at the Royal 

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APPENDIX C Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. He holds an M.S. degree in population and environmental biology, specializing in urban ecosystems, from the University of California, Irvine, and is the author of the book The Renaissance of Honolulu, the Sustain­ able Rebirth of an American City. Robert W. Kates is a Senior Research Associate at Harvard University, Presidential Professor of Sustainability Science at the University of Maine, and University Profes- sor (Emeritus) at Brown University. Trained as a geographer, he has led interdisciplin- ary programs addressing hazards, climate, and adaptation at the University of Dar as Salaam in Tanzania, Clark University, and the World Hunger Program at Brown Univer- sity. He has participated in all four IPCC Assessments, in the NRC Committee on Global Change, and in State of Maine climate advisory groups. He has co-authored or edited foundational studies on natural hazards, on climate impact assessment, and on global change in local places. His most recent research is on reconstruction following Hurri- cane Katrina and his current research is on enhancing community resilience to mul- tiple hazards. Dr. Kates is a member of the NAS. Howard C. Kunreuther is the Cecilia Yen Koo Professor of Decision Sciences and Public Policy at the Wharton School, Co-Director of the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center. He has a long-standing interest in ways that society can better manage low-probability, high-consequence events related to technological and natural hazards and has published widely in these areas. Dr. Kunreuther is a Fellow of the AAAS, a member of the NAS Panel on Adaptation Strategies for Climate Change, and Distinguished Fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis, receiving the Society’s Dis- tinguished Achievement Award in 2001. He co-chaired the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on “Innovation and Leadership in Reducing Risks from Natu- ral Disasters” and is a member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s High Level Advisory Board on Financial Management of Large-Scale Catastrophes. His most recent books are At War with the Weather (with Erwann Michel- Kerjan, July 2009, MIT Press) and Learning from Catastrophes: Strategies for Reaction and Response (with Michael Useem, December 2009, Wharton School Publishing). Linda O. Mearns is a Senior Scientist in the Institute for the Study of Society and En- vironment (ISSE) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado. She served as Director of ISSE for 3 years ending in April 2008. She holds a Ph.D. in ge- ography/climatology from the University of California, Los Angeles. She has performed research and published mainly in the areas of climate change scenario formation, quantifying uncertainties, and climate change impacts on agro-ecosystems. She has particularly worked extensively with regional climate models. She has most recently published papers on the effect of uncertainty in climate change scenarios on agricul- 

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Appendix C tural and economic impacts of climate change, and quantifying uncertainty of re- gional climate change. She has been an author in the IPCC Climate Change 1995, 2001, and 2007 Assessments regarding climate variability, impacts of climate change on agriculture, regional projections of climate change, climate scenarios, and uncertainty in future projections of climate change. For the 2007 Report(s) she was lead author for the chapter on regional projections of climate change in Working Group 1 and for the chapter on new assessment methods in Working Group 2. She is also an author on two Synthesis Products of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. She leads the mul- tiagency-supported North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program, which is providing multiple high-resolution climate change scenarios for the North American impacts community. She is a member of the NRC Climate Research Commit- tee and Human Dimensions of Global Change Committee. She was made a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society in January 2006. Philip Mote serves as Director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute and Oregon Climate Services at Oregon State University and is a full professor in the Col- lege of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences. Until July 2009 he also worked at Univer- sity of Washington (UW) as a research scientist with the Climate Impacts Group, where since 1998 he had built the group’s public profile through hundreds of public speak- ing events, over a thousand media interviews, deep engagement with the region’s stakeholders, and groundbreaking research in the impacts of climate change on the West’s mountain snow and on wildfire. He has published over 70 scientific articles and edited a book on climate modeling. He served as state climatologist for Washington and, as Director of Oregon Climate Services, serves in a similar role there. He was a lead author of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report; the IPCC was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. In 2008 he received the UW Distinguished Staff Award and was named one of the region’s 25 most influential people by Seattle Magazine. He earned a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from UW and a B.A. in physics from Harvard. Andrew A. Rosenberg is Senior Vice President for Science and Knowledge for Conser- vation International and Professor in the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space at the University of New Hampshire where, prior to April 2004, he was Dean of the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture. From 2001 to 2004, he was a member of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy and continues to work with the U.S. Joint Ocean Commissions Initiative. Dr. Rosenberg was the Deputy Director of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) from 1998 to 2000, the senior career position in the agency, and prior to that he was the NMFS Northeast Regional Administrator. Dr. Rosenberg’s scientific work is in the field of population dynamics, resource assessment, and resource management policy. He holds a B.S. in fisheries biology from the Univer- 

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APPENDIX C sity of Massachusetts, an M.S. in oceanography from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in biology from Dalhousie University. Henry g. Schwartz, Jr., is an independent consultant. He is a nationally recognized civil and environmental engineering leader who spent most of his career with Sver- drup Civil, Inc. (now Jacobs Civil, Inc.), which he joined as a registered professional engineer in 1966. In 1993, Schwartz was named president and chairman, directing the transportation, public works, and environmental activities of Sverdrup/Jacobs Civil, Inc., before he retired in 2003. Dr. Schwartz’s projects included multibillion-dollar water and wastewater treatment systems for the cities of San Diego, San Francisco, and De- troit as well as large civil-infrastructure projects, such as highways, bridges, dams, and railroads. Dr. Schwartz is a Director of the Berger Group and was a Senior Professor of Engineering Management at Washington University in St. Louis from 2003 to 2007. He has served on the advisory boards for Carnegie Mellon University, Washington Univer- sity, and the University of Texas, and he is President Emeritus of the Academy of Sci- ence of St. Louis. He is Founding Chairman of the Water Environment Research Foun- dation and served as President of the Water Environment Federation. Dr. Schwartz is past president of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was elected to NAE in 1997 (Section 4: civil engineering) and has served on several NRC study committees, including service as chair of the Committee on Climate Change and U.S. Transporta- tion, and is on the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board. Cur- rently, he is a member of the Unified Synthesis Product Development Committee of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. Dr. Schwartz received a Ph.D. from the Cali- fornia Institute of Technology and M.S. and B.S. degrees from Washington University; he also attended Princeton University and Columbia University’s Business Program. Joel b. Smith has been analyzing climate change impacts and adaptation issues since 1987. He was a coordinating lead author for the synthesis chapter on climate change impacts for the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a lead author on a similar chapter in the Fourth Assessment, a lead author for the U.S. National Assessment on climate change impacts, technical coordinator on vulnerability and adaptation for the U.S. Country Studies Program, and coordinator of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change series on environment. He has provided technical advice, guidance, and training on assessing climate change impacts and adaptation to people around the world and for clients such as the United Nations; the World Bank; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); USAID; the states of California, Florida, and Alaska; and for municipalities such as Denver, San Francisco, Phoenix, and Boulder. Mr. Smith worked for the EPA from 1984 to 1992, where he was the deputy director of Climate Change Division. He is a co-editor of EPA’s Report to Congress: The Potential Effects of Global Climate Change on the United States (1989); 

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Appendix C As Climate Changes: International Impacts and Implications (Cambridge University Press, 1995); Adaptation to Climate Change: Assessments and Issues (Springer-Verlag, 1996); and Climate Change, Adaptive Capacity, and Development (Imperial College Press, 2003). He joined Hagler Bailly in 1992 and Stratus Consulting in 1998. He has published more than 35 articles and chapters on climate change impacts and adaptation in peer- reviewed journals and books. Besides working on climate change issues at EPA, he also was a special assistant to the assistant administrator for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation. Mr. Smith was a presidential management intern in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 1982 to 1984. He has also worked in the U.S. Department of Energy and USAID. Joel Smith received an M.P.P., B.A. in political science. gary W. yohe is the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics at Wesleyan University. He was educated at the University of Pennsylvania and received his Ph.D. in econom- ics from Yale University in 1975. He is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles, several books, and many contributions to media coverage of climate issues. Most of his work has focused attention on the mitigation and adaptation/impact sides of the cli- mate issue. Dr. Yohe served as Convening Lead Author for one chapter in the Response Options Technical Volume of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment; it focused on uncertainty and the evaluation of response options. Recognizing the enormous uncer- tainty with which we view the future evolution of the climate and socioeconomic sys- tems led him to call for a risk-management approach to climate policy—an approach that was ultimately adopted in the Synthesis Report of the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC in 2007. He has been a senior member of the IPCC since the mid-1990s, serving as a lead author for four different chapters in the Third Assessment Report and as convening lead author for the last chapter of the contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). He also worked with the core writing team to prepare the overall Synthesis Report for the entire AR4. Dr. Yohe also served as one of five editors of Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change, and he has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the “Hidden (climate change) Cost of Oil” on March 30, 2006; the Senate Energy Committee on the Stern Review on February 14, 2007; and the Senate Banking Committee on “Material Risk from Climate Change and Climate Policy“ on October 31, 2007. He sits currently on the New York Panel on Climate Change, the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change for the NRC, and the Committee on Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations, also for the NRC. 

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