APPENDIX F
Panel on Informing Effective Decisions and Actions Related to Climate Change Biographical Sketches

Diana Liverman holds joint appointments between Oxford University (as Senior Research Fellow in the Environmental Change Institute - ECI) and the University of Arizona (where she co-directs the Institute of the Environment). Her research has focused on the human dimensions of global environmental change, including climate impacts, governance, and policy; climate and development; and the political ecology of environment, land use, and development in Latin America. She has current projects on climate vulnerability and adaptation, climate impacts on food systems, and carbon offsets, and has interest in connecting research to stakeholders and climate science to the arts and creative sector. She has led or coordinated major research programs for the Tyndall Center for Climate Change, the James Martin 21st Century School at Oxford, the Global Environmental Change and Food Systems project, the U.K. Climate Impacts Program, and the Climate Assessment for the Southwest. Her advisory roles have included the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (chair) and the scientific advisory committees for the InterAmerican Institute for Global Change (co-chair). She has a B.A. in geography from University College London, an M.A. from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).


Peter H. Raven (NAS) is President of the Missouri Botanical Garden; George Engelmann Professor of Botany, Washington University in St. Louis; and a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) member. Dr. Raven’s primary interests are in conservation, global sustainability, plant systematics, biogeography, and evolution. Dr. Raven, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, was a member of President Bill Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. He also served for 12 years as home secretary of the NAS and is a member of the academies of science in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Denmark, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and several other countries. He is the author of numerous books and reports, both popular and scientific. He earned his Ph.D. at UCLA.



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APPENdIX F Panel on Informing Effective Decisions and Actions Related to Climate Change Biographical Sketches Diana Liverman holds joint appointments between Oxford University (as Senior Research Fellow in the Environmental Change Institute - ECI) and the University of Ari- zona (where she co-directs the Institute of the Environment). Her research has focused on the human dimensions of global environmental change, including climate impacts, governance, and policy; climate and development; and the political ecology of envi- ronment, land use, and development in Latin America. She has current projects on cli- mate vulnerability and adaptation, climate impacts on food systems, and carbon offsets, and has interest in connecting research to stakeholders and climate science to the arts and creative sector. She has led or coordinated major research programs for the Tyndall Center for Climate Change, the James Martin 21st Century School at Ox- ford, the Global Environmental Change and Food Systems project, the U.K. Climate Im- pacts Program, and the Climate Assessment for the Southwest. Her advisory roles have included the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (chair) and the scientific advisory committees for the InterAmerican Institute for Global Change (co-chair). She has a B.A. in geography from University College London, an M.A. from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Peter H. Raven (NAS) is President of the Missouri Botanical Garden; George Engel- mann Professor of Botany, Washington University in St. Louis; and a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) member. Dr. Raven’s primary interests are in conservation, global sustainability, plant systematics, biogeography, and evolution. Dr. Raven, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, was a member of President Bill Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. He also served for 12 years as home secretary of the NAS and is a member of the academies of science in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Denmark, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and several other countries. He is the author of numerous books and reports, both popular and scientific. He earned his Ph.D. at UCLA. 

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APPENDIx F Daniel Barstow is President of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Formed in the wake of the Challenger Space Shuttle tragedy, Challenger now has 46 Learning Centers throughout the United States, each providing simulated space mis- sions that engage and inspire students and connect them with modern tools of Earth and space exploration. Barstow leads the Challenger Center in strengthening its core operations, growing the network, and expanding its impact on science, technology, engineering, and math education. Over the past two decades, his work has focused on revolutionizing Earth and space science education by emphasizing Earth as a dynamic integrated system, Earth visualization technology, and inquiry-based learning. He was the founding chair of the national Climate Literacy Network and is actively involved in climate education through a variety of partnerships, programs, and policy reform initiatives. Rosina M. Bierbaum is dean of the University of Michigan School of Natural Re- sources and Environment. Previously, she served as acting director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President. Before her appointment as acting director, she was the associate director for environment at OSTP, serving as the administration’s senior scientific adviser on environmental research and development on a wide range of issues, including global change, air and water quality, ecosystem management, and energy research and development. Dr. Bierbaum worked closely with the President’s National Science and Technology Council and co-chaired its Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources, which coordinated the $5 billion federal research and development efforts in this area, including the (then) $2 billion U.S. Global Change Research Program. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is currently a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. She has served on numerous scientific advisory commit- tees and is a board member for several foundations. Dr. Bierbaum received her Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Daniel W. Bromley is Anderson-Bascom Professor of applied economics at the Univer- sity of Wisconsin-Madison, and Visiting Professor of Resource Economics at Humboldt University-Berlin. Professor Bromley has published extensively on the institutional foundations of the economy; legal and philosophical dimensions of property rights; economics of natural resources and the environment; and economic development. He has been editor of the journal Land Economics since 1974. He is a Fellow of the Asso- ciation of Environmental and Resource Economists, the Agricultural and Applied Eco- nomics Association, and is listed in Who’s Who in Economics. He recently completed a 3-year term as chair of the U.S. Federal Advisory Committee on Marine Protected Areas. He has been a consultant to the Global Environment Facility, the World Bank, the 0

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Appendix F Ford Foundation, the State of Alaska, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Asian Development Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Devel- opment, and the Ministry for the Environment in New Zealand. Dr. Bromley’s research interests concern the existing institutional arrangements in an economy, and the process of institutional change. He also served as a member of the Committee on the Alaska Groundfish Fishery and Steller Sea Lions, and as a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the NAS. Dr. Bromley received his Ph.D. in natural resource economics from Oregon State University in 1969. Anthony Leiserowitz, Ph.D., is director of the Yale Project on Climate Change at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. He is also a princi- pal investigator at the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University. He is an expert on American and international public opinion on global warming, including public perception of climate change risks, support and opposi- tion for climate policies, and willingness to make individual behavioral change. His research investigates the psychological, cultural, political, and geographic factors that drive public environmental perception and behavior. He has conducted survey, experimental, and field research at scales ranging from the global (140+ countries) to the national (United States), municipal (New York City), and local levels (among the Inupiaq Eskimo). He also recently conducted the first empirical assessment of world- wide public values, attitudes, and behaviors regarding global sustainability, including environmental protection, economic growth, and human development. Robert Lempert is a senior scientist at the RAND Corporation and director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for Longer Range Global Policy and the Future Human Con- dition. His research focuses decision making under uncertainty, with an emphasis on climate change, energy, and the environment. Currently, Dr. Lempert’s research team assists a number of natural resource agencies in their efforts to include climate change in their long-range plans. Dr. Lempert is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the NAS Climate Re- search Committee. A professor of policy analysis in the Pardee RAND Graduate School, Dr. Lempert is an author of the book Shaping the Next One Hundred Years: New Meth- ods for Quantitative, Longer-Term Policy Analysis. Edward L. Miles is the Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor of Marine and Public Af- fairs in the School of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington and senior fellow at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans. Since 1965, Dr. Miles has worked at the interface of the natural and social sciences and law with a focus on outer space, the oceans, and the global and regional climate systems. Trained originally in political science and international relations, he has invested more than 30 years 

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APPENDIx F in learning about oceanography and fisheries science/management and 20 years in learning about the planetary climate system. His research and teaching interests have encompassed international science and technology policy; the design, creation, and management of international environmental regimes; a wide variety of problems in national and international ocean policy; and the impacts of climate variability and climate change at global and regional spatial scales. Dr. Miles is a member of the NAS and the NRC’s Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and Policy and Global Affairs Committee. He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in international relations/comparative politics from the Graduate School of International Studies and the University of Denver. Berrien Moore III joined the University of New Hampshire (UNH) faculty in 1969, soon after receiving his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Virginia, and became a tenured professor in 1976. He was named University Distinguished Professor in 1997. He has published extensively on the global carbon cycle, biogeochemistry, remote sensing, and environmental policy. He led the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space at UNH as Director from 1987 to early 2008. Upon stepping down from his position at UNH, he became the Executive Director of Climate Central, an emerging, nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank dedicated to producing and providing the public, business and civic leaders, and policy makers with objective and understandable infor- mation about climate change and potential solutions. The group is based in Princeton, New Jersey, and Palo Alto, California. Professor Moore continues as Director Emeritus, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, UNH. Mark Newton is responsible for Dell corporate environmental sustainability policy and strategy. In this role he leads global policy development, manages stakeholder engagements, and informs corporate strategy on environmental issues including ma- terial use, energy efficiency, product recycling, and climate strategy. Mr. Newton joined Dell in 2003 as Manager of Worldwide Environmental Affairs. Under his leadership, Dell integrated global environmental design requirements into the business as part of its ongoing commitment to environmental responsibility. His team established product compliance assurance processes, introduced stakeholder concerns into the business and led policy and process development activities. Prior to joining Dell, Mr. Newton also led product-focused environmental technology programs at Apple and Motorola, and applied chemistry at DEKA R&D. He received a doctorate in chemistry in 1993 from the University of Texas at Dallas. Venkatachalam Ramaswamy is the director of NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory and is a lecturer with the rank of Professor in the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program (Department of Geosciences) and the Princeton Environmental 

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Appendix F Institute at Princeton University. His primary research is on numerical modeling of the global climate system and investigating the radiative and climatic influences of green- house gases, aerosols, and clouds. He has led key chapters in several international and national scientific assessments (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC], U.S. Global Change Research Program, and reports [e.g., NRC] on ozone deple- tion, aerosol climate forcing, climate modeling, and climate change). He was coordinat- ing lead author of chapters in the IPCC Third and Fourth Assessment Reports (2001, 2007) and was also a co-author of the Summary for Policymakers in both reports. He is a member of the World Climate Research Program’s Joint Scientific Committee, which provides advice on cutting-edge worldwide research in climate and climate change. He was a member of the organizing committee and a participant in the World Climate Conference-3 (2009). Besides modeling of atmospheric processes such as radiation, aerosols, clouds, the stratosphere, and the hydrologic cycle, he has made use of obser- vations from various platforms, combining them with appropriate model simulations to yield critical information on changes in the climate system, including knowledge of the climate feedbacks. His recent investigations include studies on understanding the roles of different species and processes in the global and regional climate change of the 20th century, and using the IPCC emissions scenarios to determine the projections of climate change in the 21st century. Richard Richels directs global climate change research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). His current research focus is the economics of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. In previous assignments, he directed EPRI’s energy analysis, environ- mental risk, and utility planning research activities. Dr. Richels has served as a lead author for the IPCC Second, Third, and Fourth Scientific Assessments and served on the Synthesis Team for the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on the United States. He also served on the Scientific Steering Committee for the U.S. Carbon Cycle Program. He currently serves on the Advisory Committee for Carnegie-Mellon University’s Center for Integrated Study of the Human Dimensions of Global Change, the U.S. Government’s Climate Change Science Program Product Development Advi- sory Committee, and the NAS Climate Research Committee. Dr. Richels received a B.S. in physics from the College of William and Mary in 1968. He was awarded an M.S. in 1973 and Ph.D. in 1976 from Harvard University’s Division of Applied Sciences, where he concentrated in decision sciences. While at Harvard he was a member of the Energy and Environmental Policy Center. Doug Scott was appointed director of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency effective July 1, 2005, and continues to serve under the leadership of Governor Pat Quinn. Doug Scott was born in Rockford in 1960 and graduated from Rockford East High School in 1978. Doug served as Assistant City Attorney and City Attorney for 

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APPENDIx F Rockford from 1985 to 1995. From 1995 to 2001, he served as an Illinois State Repre- sentative for the 67th District. He served on the Energy and Environment Committee and was a member of the committee that rewrote the states’ electric utility laws. Doug Scott was elected to the Office of the Mayor of Rockford in April 2001 and served a 4- year term. In addition to being elected to leadership positions in the Illinois Municipal League, United States Conference of Mayors, and national League of Cities, Scott has served as President of the Illinois Chapter of the National Brownfields Association. Di- rector Scott took over leadership of the nation’s oldest state environmental agency on the 35th anniversary date of the Illinois EPA’s start on July 1, 1970. He is committed to maintaining and enhancing the Agency’s key role in protecting our air, land, and water, making government more accountable and accessible to citizens and the regulated community, including local governments and business. He returned home after receiv- ing his bachelor’s degree with honors from the University of Tulsa in 1982, and gradu- ating with a law degree with honors from Marquette University in 1985. Kathleen Tierney is a professor of sociology and director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Hazards Center is housed in the Institute of Behavioral Science, where Prof. Tierney holds a joint appointment. Dr. Tierney’s research focuses on the social dimensions of hazards and disasters, including natural, technological, and human-induced extreme events. She is the author, with Mi- chael Lindell and Ronald Perry, of Facing the Unexpected: Disaster Preparedness and Response in the United States (Joseph Henry Press, 2001). With William Waugh, she recently co-edited Emergency Management: Principles and Practice for Local Govern- ment (International City and County Management Association, 2007). She is co-editor of the journal Natural Hazards Review and a former member of the NRC Committee on Disaster Research in the Social Sciences. Her current projects focus on theory and re- search on disaster resilience; warning systems for extreme weather events; and factors affecting the vulnerability of interdependent critical infrastructure systems. Chris Walker was the Director (Chief Executive) for North America for The Climate Group–North America and recently accepted the position as head of The Carbon Trust LLC in New York. Prior to these appointments, he was head of Swiss Re’s Sustainability Business Development. Here he ran the unit responsible for developing commercial applications to Swiss Re Sustainability commitments and, in particular, business op- portunities in sustainability, ecosystem markets, emissions reductions, and renewables. Mr. Walker also served as the government affairs liaison on climate change and GHG emissions issues. While based at Swiss Re’s Zurich headquarters, he created and ad- vanced from concept to initiation the company’s Greenhouse Gas Risk Solutions unit, specializing in greenhouse gas risk mitigation and opportunity innovation. In 2000, he created and led Swiss Re Group’s worldwide GHG emissions market feasibility study 

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Appendix F determining the market facilitation role for Swiss Re. Mr. Walker received his B.A. in government from St. John’s University, attended the Institute on Comparative Political and Economic Systems at Georgetown, and is also a graduate of the St. John’s School of Law. Prior to joining Swiss Re in 1996, he practiced law in New York and New Jersey. Shari T. Wilson was sworn in by Governor Martin O’Malley as Maryland’s Secretary of the Environment on March 15, 2007. As Secretary of the Environment, Ms. Wilson directs regulatory, enforcement, and voluntary programs for air quality control of sta- tionary and mobile sources, hazardous and solid waste management and cleanup, oil control, lead paint risk reduction, wastewater treatment, public drinking water supply, wetlands protection, surface and groundwater quality, mining, dam safety, risk assess- ment, and loan and grant programs for wastewater, water supply, and environmental restoration projects. Secretary Wilson administers a combined operating and capital budget of $460 million and leads a diverse staff of 950 scientists, engineers, and pro- fessionals with other technical and administrative expertise. Ms. Wilson is a member of the Governor’s Cabinet, BRAC Sub-Cabinet, Chesapeake Bay Sub-Cabinet, and Smart Growth Sub-Cabinet. Prior to becoming Secretary, Ms. Wilson served as a chief solicitor in the Baltimore City Law Department in Land Use and as a manager in the City’s Plan- ning Department from 2004 to 2007. Ms. Wilson holds three degrees: a juris doctorate from the University of Baltimore School of Law, a master’s degree from the University of Virginia, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Richmond. 

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