APPENDIX C
Panel on Limiting the Magnitude of Future Climate Change: Biographical Sketches

Mr. Robert W. Fri (Chair) is a visiting scholar and senior fellow emeritus at Resources for the Future, a nonprofit organization that studies natural resource and environmental issues. He has served as director of the National Museum of Natural History, president of Resources for the Future, and deputy administrator of both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Energy Research and Development Administration. Fri has been a director of the American Electric Power Company and vice-chair and a director of the Electric Power Research Institute. He is a trustee and vice-chair of Society for Science and the Public, and a member of the National Petroleum Council. He is active with the National Academies, where he is National Associate, vice-chair of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Marion E. Koshland Science Museum. He has chaired studies for the National Research Council on the health standards for the Yucca Mountain repository, on estimating the benefits of applied research programs at the Department of Energy (DOE), and on evaluating the nuclear energy research program at DOE. Fri received his B.A. in physics from Rice University and his M.B.A. from Harvard University, and he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi.


Dr. Marilyn A. Brown is an endowed Professor of Energy Policy in the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which she joined in 2006 after a distinguished career at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). At ORNL, she held various leadership positions and co-led the report Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future, which remains a cornerstone of engineering-economic analysis of low-carbon energy options for the United States. Her research interests encompass the design of energy and climate policies, issues surrounding the commercialization of new technologies, and methods for evaluating sustainable energy programs and policies. Dr. Brown has authored more than 200 publications including a recently published book, Energy and American Society: Thirteen Myths, and a forthcoming book, Climate Change and Energy Security. Dr. Brown has been an expert witness in hearings before committees of both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and she participates on several National Academies boards and committees. Dr. Brown has



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APPENdiX C Panel on Limiting the Magnitude of Future Climate Change: Biographical Sketches Mr. Robert W. Fri (Chair) is a visiting scholar and senior fellow emeritus at Resources for the Future, a nonprofit organization that studies natural resource and environmen- tal issues. He has served as director of the National Museum of Natural History, presi- dent of Resources for the Future, and deputy administrator of both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Energy Research and Development Administration. Fri has been a director of the American Electric Power Company and vice-chair and a direc- tor of the Electric Power Research Institute. He is a trustee and vice-chair of Society for Science and the Public, and a member of the National Petroleum Council. He is active with the National Academies, where he is National Associate, vice-chair of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Marion E. Koshland Science Museum. He has chaired studies for the National Research Council on the health standards for the Yucca Mountain repository, on estimating the benefits of applied research programs at the Department of Energy (DOE), and on evaluating the nuclear energy research program at DOE. Fri received his B.A. in physics from Rice University and his M.B.A. from Harvard University, and he is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. Dr. Marilyn A. Brown is an endowed Professor of Energy Policy in the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which she joined in 2006 after a dis- tinguished career at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). At ORNL, she held various leadership positions and co-led the report Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future, which remains a cornerstone of engineering-economic anal- ysis of low-carbon energy options for the United States. Her research interests encom- pass the design of energy and climate policies, issues surrounding the commercializa- tion of new technologies, and methods for evaluating sustainable energy programs and policies. Dr. Brown has authored more than 200 publications including a recently published book, Energy and American Society: Thirteen Myths, and a forthcoming book, Climate Change and Energy Security. Dr. Brown has been an expert witness in hearings before committees of both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and she participates on several National Academies boards and committees. Dr. Brown has 

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APPENdiX C a Ph.D. in geography from the Ohio State University, and a master’s degree in resource planning from the University of Massachusetts and is a Certified Energy Manager. Dr. Doug Arent is Executive Director of the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He specializes in strategic plan- ning and financial analysis, clean energy technologies and energy and water issues, and international and governmental policies. In addition to his NREL responsibilities, Arent is an author and expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Renewable Energy, a member of the U.S. Government Review Panel for the IPCC Reports on Climate Change, and a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Arent is on the Executive Council of the U.S. Association of Energy Economists, is a Member of the Keystone Energy Board, and is on the Advisory Board of E+Co, a public-purpose investment company that supports sustainable development across the globe. He serves on the University of Colorado Chancellor’s Committee on Energy, Environment and Sustainability Carbon Neutrality Group and on the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Council of the Western Governor’s Association. Previously, Arent was Director of the Strategic Energy Analysis Center at NREL and was a management consultant to several clean energy companies. Dr. Arent has a Ph.D. from Princeton University and an M.B.A. from Regis University. Ms. Ann Carlson is Professor of Law and the inaugural Faculty Director of the Emmett Center on Climate Change and the Environment at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Law. She is also on the faculty of the UCLA Institute of the Environment. Professor Carlson’s scholarship in environmental law focuses on climate change law and policy, federalism, and the role social norms play in affecting environ- mentally cooperative behavior. Her recent work involves analyzing unusual models of environmental federalism, with a focus on the unique role California plays in regulat- ing mobile source emissions, including greenhouse gas emissions, under the Clean Air Act. She has also written on the legal and political obstacles utilities will face in cutting greenhouse gas emissions and on the threat of heat waves and climate change. She is a frequent commentator and speaker on environmental issues, particularly on climate change. Professor Carlson’s article “Takings on the Ground” was selected in 2003 by the Land Use and Environmental Law Review as one of the top 10 environmental articles of the year. She is co-author (with Daniel Farber and Jody Freeman) of Environmental Law (7th Ed.). Professor Carlson teaches Property, Environmental Law and Climate Change Law and Policy and was the recipient of the 2006 Rutter Award for Excellence in Teach- ing. She served as the law school’s academic associate dean from 2004 to 2006. Carl- 

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Appendix C son received her J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1989 and her B.A., magna cum laude, from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1982. Ms. Majora Carter, from 2001 to 2008, was the Founder and Executive Director of Sus- tainable South Bronx (SSBx), a nonprofit environmental justice solutions corporation that designs and implements economically viable and innovative projects that are informed by community needs. She recently moved on from SSBx to form the Majora Carter Group LLC, a green-collar economic consulting firm. Carter led efforts to create the South Bronx Greenway—11 miles of alternative transport, local economic devel- opment, low-impact stormwater management, and recreational space—as well as a highly successful effort to create intensive urban forestation, green roofing and walls, and water-permeable open spaces. In 2003, SSBx started the Bronx Environmental Stewardship Training program, one of the nation’s first urban green-collar job training and placement systems. Her local and global environmental solutions rest on poverty alleviation through green economic development, and empowering communities to resist the bad environmental decisions that have led to both public health and global atmospheric problems. She is a 2006 MacArthur “genius” Fellow, one of Essence Magazine’s 25 most influential African Americans for 2007, co-host of the Green on the Sundance Channel, and host of the public radio series The Promised Land. Dr. Leon Clarke is a Senior Research Economist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and he is a staff member of the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI), a collaboration between PNNL and the University of Maryland at Col- lege Park. Dr. Clarke’s current research focuses on the role of technology in addressing climate change, international climate policy, scenario analysis, and integrated assess- ment model development. Dr. Clarke coordinated the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s emissions scenario development process (SAP 2.1a), he was a contributing author on the Working Group III contribution to the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report, and he coordinated and co-edited the Energy Modeling Forum 22 Transition Scenarios project. He is currently a lead author on the IPCC’s Special Report on Renewable Energy. Prior to joining PNNL, Dr. Clarke worked for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Pacific Gas & Electric Company, and RCG/Hagler, Bailly, Inc. He was also a research assis- tant at Stanford’s Energy Modeling Forum. Dr. Clarke received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from U.C. Berkeley and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering economic systems and operations research from Stanford University. Mr. Francisco de la Chesnaye is a Senior Economist and Policy Analyst in the Global Climate Change Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). He manages EPRI’s Regional Modeling project, which is developing a new U.S. energy-economic 

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APPENdiX C model to assess the impact of climate and energy policies on the electric power sector, the energy system, and the economy at both regional and national scales. Prior to join- ing EPRI, Mr. de la Chesnaye was the Chief Climate Economist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He was responsible for developing and applying EPA’s eco- nomic models for domestic and international climate change policy analysis. He led EPA’s efforts to produce the agency’s first independent economic analysis of a climate policy, the McCain-Lieberman bill of 2007. Mr. de la Chesnaye was a Lead Author for the IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report and was a co-editor of Human-Induced Climate Change: An Interdisciplinary Assessment (Cambridge University Press, 2007). Mr. de la Chesnaye is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Maryland. He earned an M.S. from Johns Hopkins in 2002, an M.A. from American University in 1997, and a B.S. from Norwich University, The Military College of Vermont, in 1988. Dr. George C. Eads is a Senior Consultant of Charles River Associates (CRA). Prior to joining CRA in 1995, he held several positions at General Motors (GM) Corporation, including Vice President and Chief Economist; Vice President, Worldwide Economic and Market Analysis Staff; and Vice President, Product Planning and Economics Staff. Before joining GM, Dr. Eads was Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also was a professor. Before that, he served as a Member of President Carter’s Council of Economic Advisors. He has been involved in numerous projects concerning transport and energy. In 1994 and 1995, he was a member of President Clinton’s policy dialogue on reducing greenhouse gas emis- sions from personal motor vehicles. He co-authored the World Energy Council’s 1998 Report, Global Transport and Energy Development—The Scope for Change. Over the past 4 years, Dr. Eads devoted most of his time to the World Business Council for Sustain- able Development’s Sustainable Mobility Project, a project funded and carried out by 12 leading international automotive and energy companies. Dr. Eads is a member of the Presidents’ Circle at the National Academies. He is an at-large Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Yale University. He is currently participating in a Transportation Research Board (TRB) study Potential Greenhouse Gas Reductions from Transportation and recently completed service on the TRB study Climate Change and U.S. Transportation. Dr. Genevieve Giuliano is Professor and Senior Associate Dean of Research and Technology in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of South- ern California (USC), and Director of the METRANS joint USC and California State University Long Beach Transportation Center. She also holds courtesy appointments in civil engineering and geography. Professor Giuliano’s research focus areas include relationships between land use and transportation, transportation policy analysis, and information technology applications in transportation. She has published over 

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Appendix C 130 papers and has presented her research at numerous conferences both within the United States and abroad. She serves on the editorial boards of Urban Studies and the Journal of Transport Policy. She is a past member and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). She was named a National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences in 2003, received the TRB William Carey Award for Distinguished Service in 2006, and was awarded the Deen Lectureship in 2007. She has participated in several National Research Council policy studies; currently she is on the Committee for Global Climate Change and Transportation. She was recently appointed Chair of the California Research and Technology Advisory Panel, which will advise both Caltrans and the Department of Business, Housing and Transportation on the imple- mentation of the Growth Management Plan. Dr. Andrew Hoffman is the Holcim (U.S.) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise; Professor of Natural Resources; Associate Professor of Management & Organizations; and As- sociate-Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, at the University of Michigan. He studies organizational culture, values, and behavior, with a particular emphasis on market drivers and corporate strategies for addressing climate change. Previously, he was Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Boston Uni- versity School of Management and Senior Fellow at the Meridian Institute; he also held positions at the Amoco Oil Company, T&T Construction and Design, Metcalf & Eddy, and the Environmental Protection Agency (Region 1). Dr. Hoffman has written numer- ous books and articles about corporate strategies for addressing climate change and has organized and moderated conferences that brought together senior executives from business, government, and the environmental community to discuss the scien- tific, strategic, and policy implications of controls on greenhouse gas emissions. He has a Ph.D. from MIT’s Alfred P. Sloan School of Management and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (interdepartmental degree) and a B.S. in chemical engi- neering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Robert O. Keohane is Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University. He is the author of After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (1984) and Power and Governance in a Partially Globalized World (2002). He is coauthor of Power and Interdependence (1977 and subsequent editions) and of Designing Social Inquiry (1994). He has served as the editor of the journal International Organization and as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and Sciences Po in Paris, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. His 

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APPENdiX C recent work has involved political analyses of “post-Kyoto” climate change architecture. He earned his B.A. from Shimer College in 1961 and his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1966. Dr. Loren Lutzenhiser is Professor of Urban Studies and Planning. He has a Ph.D. in so- ciology. Dr. Lutzenhiser’s teaching interests include environmental policy and practice, energy behavior and climate, technological change, urban environmental sustainabil- ity, and social research methods. His research focuses on the environmental impacts of sociotechnical systems, particularly how urban energy/resource use is linked to global environmental change. Particular studies have considered variations across households in energy consumption practices, how energy-using goods are procured by government agencies, how commercial real estate markets work to develop both poorly performing and environmentally exceptional buildings, and how the “greening” of business may be influenced by local sustainability movements and business actors. He recently completed a major study for the California Energy Commission reporting on the behavior of households, businesses, and governments in the aftermath of that state’s 2001 electricity deregulation crisis. He is currently exploring the relationships between household natural gas, electricity, gasoline, and water usage. Dr. Bruce McCarl is Distinguished Professor of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He has a Ph.D. in management science from Pennsylvania State University. His research efforts involve policy analysis in climate change, climate change mitiga- tion, and El Niño/Southern Oscillation analysis and water resource issues, as well as the proper application of quantitative methods to such analyses. Dr. McCarl began work on the agricultural and forestry effects of climate change in the 1980s, includ- ing the role agriculture and forestry could play in mitigating climate change through sequestration, GHG emissions offsets, or emissions reduction. Dr. McCarl has also been addressing agriculture and bioenergy since the late 1970s. He developed the first sector-wide economic appraisal of bioenergy prospects from agriculture and led OTA analyses of corn and cellulosic ethanol, well in advance of today’s activity. Recently McCarl has worked on greenhouse gas implications of producing biodiesel, etha- nol, cellulosic ethanol, and biofeedstock-fueled electric power. McCarl’s research has also encompassed water resources, including groundwater management, irrigation concerns in the agricultural sector, and climate change analyses. He served as a lead author for the IPCC, Agricultural Mitigation, Working Group III. Dr. Mack McFarland is an Environmental Fellow for DuPont Fluoroproducts. He received a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Colorado, was a postdoc- toral fellow at York University and then a research scientist at the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory. Mack planned, conducted, and interpreted field experiments designed to probe the cycles that control atmospheric ozone concentrations. These studies in- 0

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Appendix C cluded measurements of gases and processes important to the global climate change issue. In late 1983, Mack joined the DuPont Company. His primary responsibilities have been in the areas of coordination of research programs and assessment and interpretation of scientific information on stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change. During 1995 and 1996, Mack was on loan to the Atmosphere Unit of the United Nations Environment Programme and in 1997 he was on loan to the IPCC Working Group II Technical Support Unit. The value of his contributions to DuPont has been recognized through a C&P Flagship Award, Environmental Respect Awards, and Environmental Excellence Awards. In 1999, Mack was awarded an individual Climate Protection Award by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for his contributions in providing understandable, reliable information to decision makers. Ms. Mary D. Nichols was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as Chair- man of the California Air Resources Board in July 2007. She returned to the Air Board 30 years after serving as the Chairman under Governor Jerry Brown from 1978 to 1983. Nichols has devoted her entire career in public and private, not-for-profit ser- vice to advocating for the environment and public health. In addition to her work at the Air Board, she has held a number of positions, including assistant administrator for the EPA’s Air and Radiation program under the Clinton Administration, Secretary for California’s Resources Agency from 1999 to 2003, and Director of the University of California, Los Angeles, Institute of the Environment. As one of California’s first environ- mental lawyers, she initiated precedent-setting test cases under the Federal Clean Air Act and California air quality laws while practicing as a staff attorney for the Center for Law in the Public Interest. Nichols holds a J.D. degree from Yale Law School and a B.A. degree from Cornell University. Dr. Edward S. Rubin is a professor in the Departments of Engineering and Public Policy, and Mechanical Engineering, at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a chair as the Alumni Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science and was founding director of the university’s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies and the En- vironmental Institute. His teaching and research are in the areas of energy utilization, environmental control, technology innovation, and technology-policy interactions, with a particular focus on issues related to coal utilization, carbon sequestration, and global climate change. He is the author of over 200 technical publications and a text- book, Introduction to Engineering and the Environment. He is a fellow member of ASME, a past chairman of its Environmental Control Division, and recipient of the Air & Waste Management Association Lyman A. Ripperton Award for distinguished achievements as an educator and the Distinguished Professor of Engineering Award from Carnegie Mellon University. He has served as an advisor to government agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and on 

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APPENdiX C various committees of the National Academies, including the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, the 1992 study, Policy Implications of Global Warming, and re- cent studies of coal research and development needs and the potential for hydrogen- powered vehicles. He was also a coordinating lead author of the IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. Dr. Rubin received his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York and his master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. Dr. Thomas H. Tietenberg recently retired as the Mitchell Family Professor of Econom- ics at Colby College. Specializing in environmental and natural resource economics, his areas of expertise include emissions trading, climate change policy, and economic in- centives for pollution control. He is the author or editor of 11 books (including Environ- mental and Natural Resource Economics, one of the most widely used textbooks in the field), as well as over 100 articles and essays on environmental and natural resource economics. Former president and current fellow of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, he has consulted on environmental policy with a number of international organizations as well as several state and foreign governments. Dr. Tietenberg is currently serving as one of three appointed trustees for the Energy and Carbon Savings Trust, an organization that receives all Maine revenues from the sale of carbon allowances in the Northeast’s Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and uses them to promote energy efficiency in the state. Dr. James A. Trainham is Vice President, Strategic Energy Initiatives, for RTI Interna- tional, with a joint appointment to North Carolina State University. His focus is the research and development of solar fuels. Most recently (2008–2010), Trainham led the successful pilot demonstration of the first solar thermal biomass gasifier as Sundrop Fuels, Inc. Senior Vice President Engineering with responsibility for R&D, engineering design, scale-up, and commercialization of Sundrop Fuels’ unique solar gasification technology. Previously, he served as Vice-President of Science and Technology for PPG Industries, one of the world’s leading coatings and materials manufacturing companies. He also served as global technology director of the DuPont Company and was respon- sible for R&D for new products, new processes, and fundamental and end-use research carried out in five laboratories, and intellectual property management. A member of management since 1983, Dr. Trainham remains a technology innovator with over 40 patents and publications. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1997 and was recently honored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers as one of the “One Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era” for his leadership in sustainability. Dr. Trainham received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. degree in chemical engineering 

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Appendix C from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He recently chaired the NRC Committee on Grand Challenges for Sustainability in the Chemical Industry. 

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