Appendix G
Biographical Information: Workshop Participants

PAUL ARGYROPOULOS is the senior policy advisor in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality. Mr. Argyropoulos joined EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality’s Immediate Office as a senior policy advisor in February of 2006. He is responsible for providing advice and analysis to the office director on a broad range of transportation program issues, with a focus on fuels. For the past 6 years, he worked for Hart Downstream Energy Services serving as executive director of the International Fuel Quality Center, director of Federal Affairs, and executive director of World Refining & Fuels Conferences. Prior to joining Hart, he spent 2 years as a fuels product associate with the American Petroleum Institute, where he provided regulatory and policy coordination among API Downstream Committees on national and state fuel regulatory and policy issues. From 1980 to 1997, Mr. Argyropoulos worked for the EPA in several areas of the agency. However, the majority of his time—more than 13 years—was spent in the Office of Mobile Sources supporting development, implementation, and enforcement of federal and state regulations, including both fuel quality and vehicle emissions controls.


PATRICK ATKINS (Steering Committee Member) recently retired from the position of the director of Technology-Energy Innovation and was responsible for Alcoa’s environmental policy and global environmental programs. Dr. Atkins joined Alcoa in Pittsburgh in 1972, after serving as a professor in Environmental Health Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin where he taught engineering, industrial hygiene and ecology courses and directed M.S. and Ph.D. research projects. He became manager-environmental control at Alcoa in 1973, director-environmental control in 1980, director of environmental affairs in 1991 and to



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Appendix G Biographical Information: Workshop Participants PAUL ARGYROPOULOS is the senior policy advisor in the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality. Mr. Argyropoulos joined EPA’s Office of Transportation and Air Quality’s Immediate Office as a senior policy advisor in February of 2006. He is responsible for pro - viding advice and analysis to the office director on a broad range of transportation program issues, with a focus on fuels. For the past 6 years, he worked for Hart Downstream Energy Services serving as executive director of the International Fuel Quality Center, director of Federal Affairs, and executive director of World Refining & Fuels Conferences. Prior to joining Hart, he spent 2 years as a fuels product associate with the American Petroleum Institute, where he provided regu- latory and policy coordination among API Downstream Committees on national and state fuel regulatory and policy issues. From 1980 to 1997, Mr. Argyropoulos worked for the EPA in several areas of the agency. However, the majority of his time—more than 13 years—was spent in the Office of Mobile Sources supporting development, implementation, and enforcement of federal and state regulations, including both fuel quality and vehicle emissions controls. PATRICK ATKINS (Steering Committee Member) recently retired from the position of the director of Technology-Energy Innovation and was responsible for Alcoa’s environmental policy and global environmental programs. Dr. Atkins joined Alcoa in Pittsburgh in 1972, after serving as a professor in Environmental Health Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin where he taught engineer- ing, industrial hygiene and ecology courses and directed M.S. and Ph.D. research projects. He became manager-environmental control at Alcoa in 1973, director- environmental control in 1980, director of environmental affairs in 1991 and to 

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8 APPENDIX G his director’s position in 1995. He also served as Alcoa’s chief environmental engineer from 1982 to 1984. Author of over 50 technical articles and editor of two books, Dr. Atkins is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. He represents Alcoa on the environmental committees of the International Primary Aluminum Institute, the Business Roundtable, National Association of Manufacturers and other national and international groups. In ad - dition, he is a former member of the National Research Council’s Commission on Geosciences, Environment and Resources. Dr. Atkins is a registered professional engineer in the states of Texas and Pennsylvania and is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, teaching indus - trial waste treatment technology. Dr. Atkins received a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the university of Kentucky in 1964 and master of science in environmental engineering from Stanford University a year later. He also earned a doctor of philosophy degree in 1968 from Stanford specializing in environ - mental engineering. BRUCE BABCOCK is a professor of Economics and the Director of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development at Iowa State University. Professor Bab - cock’s research interests include understanding agricultural commodity markets, the impacts of biofuels on U.S. and world agriculture, the development of in - novative risk management strategies for farmers, and the analysis of agricultural and trade policies. Professor Babcock is originally from Southern California. He received his B.S. in economics of resource use and his M.S. in agricultural eco - nomics from the University of California at Davis, and his Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California at Berkeley. CARMEN BAIN is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the Iowa State University (ISU). Dr. Bain’s research interests include the political economy of global agri-food systems, international development, and social stud - ies of science and technology. She has conducted research in Chile, Ghana, New Zealand, and the United States. Her work has been published in the journals Rural Sociology and Food Policy and several edited volumes including Agricultural Governance: Globalization and the New Politics of Regulation; Supermarkets and Agri-food Supply Chains and; Between the Local and the Global. Confront - ing Complexity in the Contemporary Food Sector. Her current research focuses on the social and economic impact of bioeconomy and biofuels development in Iowa. She is the advisor for the Public Service and Administration in Agriculture Program at ISU. Dr. Bain received a bachelor’s and master’s degree from the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. She also earned a doctor of Philosophy degree from Michigan State University. PAUL BATCHELLER is a partner at PrairieGold Venture Partners where he oversees all aspects of the firm’s investment activities, from sourcing, structuring,

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9 APPENDIX G and negotiating investments to serving as a board member for portfolio compa - nies. His investment activities at PrairieGold are focused on Greentech and IT. He currently serves on the boards of iCentera, Game Plan Technologies, Augusta Systems, and a cellulosic ethanol company that is currently in stealth mode. In ad- dition, he oversees PrairieGold’s investment in General Compression, a developer of next-generation wind turbines. Mr. Batcheller is also a board member of South Dakota Rural Enterprise, a statewide non-profit economic development organiza- tion. Prior to joining PrairieGold, he served for 7 years as an advisor to Senator Tom Daschle, where he worked on economic policy, science, and technology issues. He received his B.A. in economics from Macalester College. MICHAEL BELL is an associate professor of Rural Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is principally an environmental sociologist, but he also conducts research on culture, economic sociology, sustainable agriculture, community, place, rural society, inequality, gender, the body, democracy, and social theory. Two central themes can be heard in all of his work: dialogics and the sociology of “nature,” broadly conceived. He is the author of Childerley: Nature and Morality in a Country Village (University of Chicago Press, 1994), which was co-winner of the 1995 Outstanding Book Award of the Sociology of Culture Section of the American Sociological Association. Along with Gregory Peter, Susan Jarnagin, and Donna Bauer, he is the author of the forthcoming book Farming for Us All: Practical Agriculture and the Cultivation of Sustainability (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004). The second edition of his An Invita - tion to Environmental Sociology (Pine Forge Press [Sage]), 1998) appeared in 2004. Dr. Bell has also worked as a geologist, and is the author of The Face of Connecticut: People, Geology, and the Land (State of Connecticut, 1985), which won an American Library Association award. He continues to have a second life as a part-time composer of songs, fiddle tunes, and classical music. He also plays mandolin in an old-time string band, the Barn Owl Band, which recently appeared on the national public radio show A Prairie Home Companion. He is currently at work on a string quartet, a suite for piano, and a symphonic poem. MARILYN BUFORD provides national leadership for U.S. Forest Service re- search programs in silviculture and sustainable forest productivity, and co-leads the FS Biobased Products and Bioenergy Research Program. Dr. Buford joined the Forest Service R&D National Program Staff in August, 1998, serving as na - tional program leader for Quantitative Ecology Research and co-lead for Forest Service Global Change Research Program. She served as scientist and project leader in Charleston, SC (Forested Wetlands) and in Research Triangle Park, NC (Southern Forest Productivity) from 1985 to 1998. During that time, she helped form and lead the Short Rotation Woody Crops Cooperative Research Program located at the Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC). She is a leader of the U. S. Department of Agriculture Biobased Products and Bioenergy Coordination Council, an active member of the Interagency Woody Biomass Utilization Group,

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0 APPENDIX G and serves on numerous interagency teams providing analysis and technical information for federal bioenergy and biobased products efforts. Dr. Buford is immediate past chair of the Short Rotation Woody Crops (SRWC) Operations Working Group, a public-private partnership to promote collaborative efforts in developing needed science and technology for SRWC plantations. Her personal research and publications have focused on forest stand dynamics, forest carbon management, and forest productivity. She earned a B.S. in biology from Rhodes College (Memphis, TN), M.S. in silviculture (State University of New York Col- lege of Environmental Science and Forestry) and Ph.D. in forestry from North Carolina State University. She is a native of Houston, TX. JOHN CARBERRY (Steering Committee Member) recently retired from the position of the director of Environmental Technology for the DuPont Com - pany in Wilmington, DE. He was responsible for recommendations on technical programs for DuPont based on an analysis of environmental issues. He led this technology function in a transition to increasingly emphasize waste prevention and product stewardship while maintaining excellence in treatment. Externally, Mr. Carberry is a past chair of the standing National Academy Committee on the Destruction of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Weapons, a founding member of the Green Power Market Development Group and of the Vision2020 Steering Committee, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering Committees on; Technologies for Sequestering CO2, and Metrics for Documenting Progress in Global Change Research. Since 1990, he has served on four other National Academies’ Committees and has presented 30 lectures on environmental issues at 18 universities, given invited presentations at 63 public conferences worldwide and provided 21 literature interviews, or contributions. He holds a B.ChE. and an M.E. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University and an MBA from the University of Delaware. PETER CIBOROWSKI (Steering Committee Member) leads the climate change team of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. He has served on the steering committees and working groups of the University of Minnesota’s Ter- restrial Carbon Sequestration Initiative, Sustainable Transportation Initiative, and adaptation initiative. He represented the Midwest in the discussions leading to the design of the Climate Registry (TCR) and has served on the TCR General Reporting Protocol working group, the TCR Mandatory Reporting Committee, and working groups developing reporting protocols for the electric power sector and local governments. The TCR is a 42-state effort to develop a uniform national reporting system for GHGs. He served on the Midwest Registry committee and the USEPA Emission Inventory Improvement Program for GHGs and was an invited presenter to the White House Task Force on Climate Change under the Clinton Administration. He directs the work of MPCA staff on the model rule and reporting and standards committees of the Midwest Accord, the six-state

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 APPENDIX G Midwest effort to develop a cap-and-trade program for GHGs. He is author of the Minnesota Climate Action Plan and, just recently, the 2009 MPCA report on “Minnesota GHG Emissions, 1970-2006: Update and Progress Report.” He developed the analysis for Minnesota’s GHG externality value for energy plan - ning and Minnesota’s environmental disclosure reporting, as well as the analysis of statewide GHG emissions used for the Minnesota Climate Change Advisory Group (MCCAG), the Governor’s 2007-2008 GHG task force. He sat on the MC - CAG emission inventory, energy supply and cross-cutting committees. Recent projects include: the MPCA guidance incorporation of GHGs into state environ- mental review and permitting processes and the MPCA solid waste stakeholder process for reducing GHG emissions. He holds a masters degree in Public Affairs from the University of Minnesota. RANDALL FORTENBERY is the RENK Chair in Agribusiness, Agricul- tural and Applied Economics and the director of Renk Agribusiness Institute in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research program currently focuses on agricultural price performance in local and national markets. He is also engaged in studying the impact of futures price action on the stability of cash prices. Another part of his research is identifying specific causal effects of recent price action in agricultural markets. This research includes the impact of U.S. futures trading on the price structure in the developing countries of Central America. Dr. Fortenbery holds a B.S. in Natural Resource Economics and an M.S. in Applied Economics from Montana State University, and a Ph.D in Agricultural Economics from the Uni - versity of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. ALISA GALLANT is a research physical scientist and ecosystems geographer with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. She conducts multiscale, integrated, geospatial research to char- acterize the landscape and landscape change and to assess the consequences of change on ecosystem functions and sustainability with respect to wildlife and biodiversity. She is a principal investigator on an interdisciplinary team estimat - ing the effects of alternative landscape futures, as driven the demand for biomass for energy and a shifting climate, on ecosystem processes and services in the northern Great Plains. Dr. Gallant holds B.A.’s in Biology and Art from Sonoma State University, an M.S. in Biological Science from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. through a Remote Sensing and GIS program from Colorado State University. ALISON GOSS ENG is currently the lead for sustainability research and devel- opment programming for the Biomass and Bioenergy Program at the U.S. De- partment of Energy. She received her Ph.D. from Purdue University in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and has a background in terrestrial ecology, hydrogeog -

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 APPENDIX G raphy and human impacts on water resources. She also currently serves on the Interagency Sustainability Working Group under the Federal Biomass Research and Development Board. Dr. Eng is a member of the U.S. delegation on the Global Bioenergy Partnership’s Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Sustainability working groups, and represents the Department of Energy on the Council for Sustainable Biomass Production, a multi-stakeholder group developing biomass to biofuel sustainability principles and standards for the production of feedstocks for second-generation biorefineries. She is also representing the United States as a lead author on the bioenergy chapter of a new International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on renewable energy and climate change mitigation. ELISABETH A. GRAFFY (Steering Committee Member) has worked on na- tional, state, and international sustainability policies and programs for more than 20 years, and as policy advisor and economist with the U.S. Geological Survey for the last decade. She most recently served as the Department of the Interior’s Coordinator for Environmental Indicators and representative on the interdepart - mental team that designed the national environmental indicators initiative, an - nounced by the White House in 2008. She participates in the federal interagency effort to develop sustainability indicators for biofuels and is collaborating with partners in state and federal agencies, universities, and non-governmental orga - nizations to explore frameworks for addressing energy and other cross-cutting issues, with particular attention to the special challenges of bridging research and policy development. During her tenure with the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, Dr. Graffy co-authored two major policy assessments on agriculture, environment, and trade. While at USGS, she has authored, edited, or overseen numerous publications on related themes and developed new conceptual models related to the intersection of science and policy. Her papers and public presentations appear in many forums, including conference proceedings and jour- nals such as Society and Natural Resources, the International Journal of Global Enironmental Issues, and Public Administration Reiew. She holds an A.B. in Politics from Princeton University, an M.S. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Ph.D. in Policy from the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. NATHANAEL GREENE (Steering Committee Member) is a senior policy analyst of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Greene received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Policy from Brown University and a Master of Science Degree in Energy and Resources from University of California Berkeley. He joined NRDC in 1992 and worked 2 years before getting his master’s degree and returned to NRDC in 1996 and working there since. He is a senior policy analyst and is responsible for working on energy policy and related issues including util - ity restructuring, energy taxes, energy efficiency, renewables, and low-income services. He has particular expertise in clean energy technologies including wind,

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3 APPENDIX G solar and biomass energy, fuel cells, combined heat and power and energy effi - ciency and in regulations and policies to promote these technologies. For the past few years he has been focusing on assessing the sustainable potential for biofuels and developing policies to advance them. ALAN HECHT is the director for Sustainable Development in the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Office of Research and Development. He was Associate Director for Sustainable Development at the White House Council on Environmental Quality (2002-2003) and Director of International Environmental Affairs for the National Security Council (2001-2002). He served as the White House coordinator for the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development. He was the Deputy Assistant Administrator for International Activities at the EPA (1989-2001). Twice he received EPA’s highest award, the Gold Medal, for leading U.S. negotiations for the environmental side agreement to the North American Free Trade Agreement and for his innovative work on promoting nuclear waste management in Russia. He has recently published articles on sustainable develop- ment in Environmental Forum (2003) and Water Policy (2004). Dr. Hecht earned a Ph.D. degree at Case Western Reserve University. JASON HILL (Steering Committee Member) is a research associate in the Department of Applied Economics and the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include the technological, environmental, economic, and social aspects of sustainable bioen - ergy production from current and next-generation feedstocks. His work on the life cycle impacts of transportation biofuels has been published in the journals Sci - ence and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He is currently focusing on the effects that the expanding global biofuels industry is having on climate change, land use, biodiversity, and human health. Dr. Hill has testified before U.S. Senate committees on the use of diverse prairie biomass for biofuel production and on the greenhouse gas implications of ethanol and biodiesel. He has also performed independent analysis for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the National Research Council, and the U.S. Environmental Protec - tion Agency. Dr. Hill received his A.B. in biology from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in plant biological sciences from the University of Minnesota. TRACEY HOLLOWAY (Steering Committee Member) is the director of the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE), a cross- disciplinary research center based in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Stud- ies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Holloway’s research examines air pollution chemistry and transport at regional and global scales, including links between air quality and climate, energy, land use, health, and public policy. As an assistant professor in the Nelson Institute, she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on environmental modeling, air resource management, and atmospheric

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 APPENDIX G chemistry, and she has affiliate appointments in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sci - ences (AOS), Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), and the La Follette School of Public Policy. Dr. Holloway earned her Ph.D. in AOS from Princeton University in 2001, and completed a certificate in Science, Technology, and En - vironmental Policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Her undergraduate degree (Sc.B.) is from Brown University in Applied Mathematics, and her post-doctoral work was done at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. MOLLY JAHN serves as dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UW Madison and Director of the Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Station. Her efforts were instrumental in securing the Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center on the UW Madison campus and in launching the Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative. She has worked to coordinate university-based research, extension and outreach in bioenergy with state and federal initiatives and priorities and to support coordinated regional efforts in the Midwest. She serves as the lead dean in the hire of eight new faculty positions committed by the State of Wisconsin to support sustainable bioenergy technologies and for the con- struction of a $50M facility for sustainable and renewable energy. She also holds a faculty appointment in the Departments of Genetics and Agronomy. Dr. Jahn’s research has focused on the genetics, genomics and breeding of crop plants, releasing more than two dozen crop varieties currently grown commercially on six continents. She has also worked extensively overseas to link crop breeding objectives to improvement in human nutrition and income, and currently is active in a number of leadership roles in international development. Dr. Jahn received her B.A. with Distinction in Biology from Swarthmore College and holds gradu - ate degrees from Cornell and MIT. She served 15 years on the faculty at Cornell University prior to assuming her current position. BRENDAN JORDAN is the program manager of the Great Plains Institute. Mr. Jordan focuses on staffing the Midwestern Governors Association (MGA) En - ergy Security and Climate Stewardship Platform, the North Central Bioeconomy Consortium (NCBC), and the Native Grass Energy Initiative. His work promotes the development of a Midwestern bioeconomy that stimulates rural economic development, makes improvements to air, soil, and water quality, and addresses global warming. He has a Masters Degree in Science, Technology, and Envi- ronmental Policy from the University of Minnesota, and a B.A. in biology from Carleton College. JIM KLEINSCHMIT is the director of Rural Communities Program for the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP). Kleinschmit’s work focuses on promoting working landscapes and sustainable rural development in both the United States and abroad. Current projects include: working with farmers and other stakeholders to establish sustainable crop production standards and markets

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 APPENDIX G in the Midwest; promoting and facilitating renewable energy and sustainable bioindustrial development projects; and helping increase understanding of the relationship of agriculture to surface and ground water management in the Great Lakes Basin. He has a M.A. from the Jackson School of International Studies of the University of Washington, and a B.A. in European history and Russian studies from St. Olaf College, Minnesota. He was raised on and is still active in the operation of his family’s farm in Nebraska. He worked on rural development in the Baltics and Russia and in 1995 began working as the coordinator for the IATP’s International Fellows Program, which informed officials from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe about international trade and agriculture issues. In 1996, he joined the Environment and Agriculture Program, focusing on nutri - ent and watershed management. PATRICIA KOSHEL (Staff) is a senior program officer with the National Academies’ Policy and Global Affairs Division. She has been the staff lead for a consensus study on science and technology in U.S. Foreign Assistance Programs and has also worked on the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program. Before joining the National Academies, Ms. Koshel was the director of Bilateral Programs in the Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Environmental Protec - tion Agency. Before that she was the Energy and Environmental Policy Advisor for the U.S. Agency for International Development. She has a master’s degree in economics. CHRIS KUCHARIK is an assistant professor of Agronomy and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He graduated from the Uni - versity of Wisconsin-Madison in 1997 with a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences (minor soil science). During his graduate studies, he participated in the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), an international field experiment that took place in the Canadian boreal forest. He helped design a high-resolution, two-band, ground-based remote-sensing instrument, called a Multiband Vegeta - tion Imager—which allowed for advanced studies of forest canopy architecture and enabled for more accurate predictions of carbon cycling in high latitude ecosystems. Currently, his research focuses on integrating field observations and numerical models of natural and managed ecosystems to better understand the influence of changing climate and land management on ecosystem services. Dr. Kucharik’s interests include carbon cycling and sequestration in wetlands, prairie ecosystems, and agricultural landscapes, water quality, biofuels, and how crop yields are affected by climate change and farmer management. This work has been supported by a NASA Interdisciplinary Science (IDS) grant, through the DOE National Institute for Climate Change Research (NICCR), Madison Gas and Electric, S.C. Johnson, and a Wisconsin Focus on Energy grant. KATHLEEN McALLISTER (Staff) is a research associate with the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program (STS) at the National Academies. Be-

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6 APPENDIX G fore joining the National Academies in 2006, she attended Lehigh University and graduated with highest honors with a B.A. in Sociology. Ms. McAllister wrote an honors thesis on social implications of human trafficking in the United States and worked throughout her college career as a research assistant for professors of Sociology at Lehigh University. She also speaks conversational Spanish, and has had internships in the offices of U.S. Representative Paul E. Kanjorski and U.S. Senator Arlen Specter. She is concurrently pursuing her M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy at Johns Hopkins University. JOHN A. MIRANOWSKI (Steering Committee Member) is a professor in the Department of Economics at Iowa State University. He served as chair of the department from 1995 to 2000. Dr. Miranowski has expertise in soil conservation, natural-resource management, water quality, land management, energy, global change, and agricultural research decision making. He has previously served as director of the Resources and Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (1984-1994); executive coordinator of the secretary of agriculture’s Policy Coordination Council and special assistant to the deputy secretary of agriculture (1990-1991); and Gilbert F. White fellow at Resources for the Future (1981-1982). Dr. Miranowski headed the U.S. del- egation to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Joint Working Party on Agriculture and the Environment (1993-1995). He has served as a member of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Risk Assessment of Federal Co - ordinating Committee on Science, Education, and Technology (1990-1992); di - rector of the Executive Board of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (1989-1992); and director of the Executive Board of the American Agricultural Economics Association (1987-1990). Dr. Miranowski is currently serving on the Alternative Liquid Transportation Fules Committee of the National Research Council’s America’s Energy Future Study. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Impact of Emerging Agricultural Trends on Fish and Wildlife Habitat. He received a B.S. degree in agricultural business from Iowa State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. MARINA S. MOSES (Staff) recently joined the Policy and Global Affairs Divi- sion of the National Academies as the Director for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program. Prior to joining the Academies, Dr. Moses served on the faculty of The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health. At the University, Dr. Moses was the director of the Doctoral Program and the Practicum Coordinator for the graduate program. Dr. Moses was the recipient of the 2005 Pfizer Scholar in Public Health Award and has worked in emergency preparedness and communication with communities on public health issues. Currently, she is the president of National Capital Area Chapter of the Society of

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 APPENDIX G Risk Analysis. Before joining the faculty at the George Washington University, Dr. Moses held senior scientific positions in the Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and in the Superfund Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a Regional office. At the DOE, she worked on the development of a qualitative framework to assess hazardous and nuclear waste risks from DOE sites and helped establish a long- term research program on “transformational” science. Prior to her experience at DOE, she served as the senior human health risk assessor in the New York City Office of EPA’s Superfund Program where she worked on risk assessments that addressed abandoned hazardous waste sites and developed national guidance and policies in this area. During her years in New York City, she also held an appoint- ment as Assistant Adjunct Clinical Professor of Public Health in the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Moses received her B.A. (Chemistry) and her M.S. (Environmental Health Sciences) degrees from Case Western Reserve University. She received her Doctorate of Public Health (Envi- ronmental Health Sciences) from Columbia University School of Public Health. MARCIA PATTON-MALLORY (Steering Committee Member) is a loaned executive from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. She works closely with the Western Forestry Leadership Coalition to help accomplish their strategic goals related to biomass utilization, bioenergy, and climate change. She also is a member of the Forest Service’s Climate Change Strategy team working on mitigation, and participates with regional and national climate change initia - tives in relation to forestry and bioeneryg. Previously, she coordinated the woody biomass efforts of the USDA Forest Service across programs and provided execu- tive liaison and coordination between the USDA Forest Service and other federal agencies, state organizations and private interests. She has 25 years of Forest Service experience as: station director of the Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, CO; staff specialist in Forest Products and Harvesting Research, Washington, DC; and research engineer, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, WI. Additional relevant experience includes Science and Technology Fellow in the U.S. Senate working on energy and natural resources issues, and internships with Weyerhaeuser Company, Tacoma, WA. GREG NEMET is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin in the La Follette School of Public Affairs and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. He is also a member of the university’s Energy Sources and Policy Cluster and a senior fellow at the university’s Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy. His research and teaching focus on improving understanding of the environmental, social, economic, and technical dynamics of the global energy system. He teaches courses in international environmental policy and energy sys - tems analysis. A central focus of his research involves empirical analysis of the process of innovation and technological change. He is particularly interested in

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8 APPENDIX G how the outcomes of this line of research can inform public policy related to im - provements in low-carbon energy technologies. His work is motivated by a more general interest in issues related to energy and the environment, including how government actions can expand access to energy services while reducing their environmental impacts. He is a lead author of the Global Energy Assessment. He holds a master’s degree and doctorate in energy and resources, both from the University of California, Berkeley. His undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College is in geography and economics. PETER NOWAK served as both an assistant and associate professor at Iowa State University before joining the faculty at the University of Wisconsin in 1985. At the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences in Madison he holds multiple appointments as a Soil and Water Conservation Specialist in the Environmental Resources Center, Research Professor in the Department of Rural Sociology, and Chair of Academic Programs in the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. He also served as Chair of the Wisconsin Buffer Initiative for the last three years. Pete’s career has focused on measuring and explaining the adoption and diffusion of agricultural technologies, especially those with natural resource management implications. More recently he has focused on examining the appli - cation of spatial analytical techniques and statistics to critical issues in resource management. His work has been published in a variety of journals and books. He has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, Editorial Board of the Journal of Precision Agriculture and on the Foundation for Environmental Agricultural Education. In the recent past he has worked with the National Academy of Science’s Board on Agriculture, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Management and Budget, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and a National Blue Ribbon Panel examining the USDA Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Project. He also served on the Board of Directors of the Soil and Water Conservation Society. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota’s College of Agriculture in 1977. DONNA PERLA is a senior advisor in the Office of Research and Develop- ment at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She leads the Office of Research and Development’s biofuels effort and assists EPA’s representative to the federal Biomass Research and Development Board and participates in sev - eral interagency teams related to the development of a National Biofuels Action Plan. Her work focuses on looking at the sustainability of the biofuels system, including environmental and human health considerations of feedstock, technolo- gies, distribution and use. Donna also leads an EPA Waste-to-Energy network, which explores the environmental aspects of conversion technologies for a wide variety of wastes, including disaster debris. Other positions in her 22 years with EPA include: director of the Innovative Pilots Division in the Office of Policy, Economic, and Innovation; chief of the Waste Minimization Branch in the Of-

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9 APPENDIX G fice of Solid Waste, Chief of the Colorado/Montana Permitting and Enforcement Section, EPA, Region 8; chief of the Economic Analysis and Risk Assessment Section in the Office of Solid Waste; and special assistant to the Director of the Office of Solid Waste. She holds a B.S. in Biology (University of Hartford) and a Masters of Public Health (Yale University). GARY RADLOFF (Steering Committee Member) is the director of Policy and Strategic Communications at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection shaping department-wide policy initiatives and communication plans. He is staff liaison to the North Central Bioeconomy Con - sortium (NCBC), a 12-state partnership of Agriculture departments, University Extension offices and Agriculture Research Stations. Radloff serves on the Steer- ing Committee for the Midwest Agriculture Energy Network (MAEN), a regional policy incubator. He is on the Advisory Committee to the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts (WICCI), researching and providing outreach on climate change adaptation policy and practices. Recent projects in promoting re - newable energy policy and climate stewardship include advising the Agriculture and Forestry Work Group of the Governor’s Task Force on Global Warming. He also assisted with policy planning and platform development for the Midwest Governor’s Association, Energy Security and Climate Stewardship held in No - vember 2007. Previously, he served as a policy staff and co-author of final reports for two major Wisconsin projects; Governor (Jim Doyle’s) Consortium on the Biobased Industry and the Working Lands Initiative. The Governor’s Consortium is a roadmap for positioning Wisconsin to play a key role in promoting the use of renewable energy and growing the state’s bioeconomy. The Working Lands Initiative is a report of detailed policy steps and strategies to protect the source of food and fiber, paper and pulp, and biomass—the Wisconsin working lands in agriculture and forestry. He is a grant reviewer with the Environmental and Eco - nomic Research and Development Program with the Focus on Energy Program, Public Service Commission, and a member of the Universal Service Council of the Public Service Commission. He has a Master’s Degree in Public Administra - tion and Public Policy. JOHN REGALBUTO is currently the director of the Catalysis and Biocatalysis Program in the Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation. He is the lead co-chair of the Biomass Conversion Interagency Working Group, which reports to the National Biomass R&D Board. Dr. Regalbuto’s home institution is the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering. His education includes a B.S. in Chemical Engineer- ing from Texas A&M University in 1981, an M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 1983 and a Ph.D. from Notre Dame in 1986. Directly thereafter he joined the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has several hundred research publications and presentations, and most recently has edited

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60 APPENDIX G one of the few books in his research specialty, catalyst preparation. Dr. Regalbuto has twice served as president of the Catalysis Club of Chicago, and has been ac - tive organizing symposia on catalysis for meetings for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Chemical Society. He has 3 children and his wife also holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering. PHIL ROBERTSON is Professor of Ecosystem Science in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Michigan State University (MSU), with which he has been associated since 1981. Since 1988 he has directed the NSF Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program in Agricultural Ecology at the W.K. Kel - logg Biological Station, where he is a resident faculty. He currently serves as chair of the U.S. LTER Network’s Science Council and Executive Board. He is also program leader for sustainability in the Department of Energy’s Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center. Dr. Robertson’s research interests include the biogeochemistry and ecology of field crop ecosystems, including biofuel systems, and in particular nitrogen and carbon dynamics, greenhouse gas fluxes, and the functional significance of microbial diversity in these systems. Dr. Robertson has been a SCOPE-Mellon postdoctoral fellow at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1980-1981) and a sabbatical scholar at Cooperative Research Cen - tres in Adelaide (1993-1994) and Brisbane (2001-2002), Australia. His service also includes past membership on the U.S. Carbon Cycle Scientific Steering Committee, chairmanships of competitive grants panels at the USDA (the NRI and Fund for Rural America Programs), and membership on several NSF panels in the Biological and Geosciences directorates. He served on the National Re - search Council Committee to Evaluate the USDA NRI Program (1998-1999), and chaired the Environment Subcommittee of the NRC Committee on Op- portunities in Agriculture (2000-2002). He has testified before the U.S. Senate Agriculture, Forestry, and Nutrition Committee and participated in briefings for the U.S. House Science and Agriculture Committees. He has also served as an editor for the journals Ecology, Ecological Monographs, and Plant and Soil and is currently an editor for Biogeochemistry. In 2003, he was elected a Fellow in the Soil Science Society of America. In 2005 he received MSU’s Distinguished Faculty award. Dr. Robertson received his B.A. from Hampshire College and his Ph.D. in Biology from Indiana University. BRUCE D. RODAN (Steering Committee Member) is a Senior Policy Advisor- Environment in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Dr. Rodan serves as OSTP liaison to the Ecosystems and the Toxics and Risk Subcommittees of the NSTC Committee on Environment and Natural Re - sources (CENR). Dr. Rodan is a medical doctor (U. Melb) with Masters Degrees in Environmental Studies (U. Melb) and Public Health (Harvard). His work has included environmental risk analyses for toxic chemicals under the U.S. EPA

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6 APPENDIX G Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), negotiating the Stockholm Conven - tion on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), and research on neotropical timber species under the CITES Treaty. RUTH SCOTTI is the Biofuels Regulatory Affairs Manager for BP Biofuels. She constructs advocacy strategy and company advocacy positions for BP’s new Biofuels business. While at the University of Michigan, she was a summer as - sociate in the renewable energy leadership program at GE Wind. Prior to that she conducted market research in Taiwan and funding strategies for U.S. grant makers seeking to fund Chinese non-governmental organizations. She holds an under- graduate degree in psychology and biology with minors in chemistry and Asian studies. She is fluent in Mandarin Chinese and speaks conversational French. THERESA SELFA, assistant professor of Sociology, has expertise in rural, en- vironmental, agricultural and development sociology, with research experience in Brazil, Philippines, Europe and the US. She was a post-doctoral associate in Washington State on a project examining alternative agriculture and food sys - tems. She recently completed research examining environmental attitudes and behaviors toward land management in Devon, England. Dr. Selfa is currently working as the lead social scientist on an interdisciplinary water quality project assessing impacts of farmers’ management behavior on water quality in an ag- ricultural watershed in Central Kansas, and as the lead social scientist in a new interdisciplinary program in Agricultural Resource and Environment Manage - ment. She is the PI on a DOE-funded study on the Impacts of Biofuels on Rural Communities in Kansas and Iowa. Her work has been published in Society and Natural Resources, Enironment and Planning A, Journal of Rural Studies, and Agriculture and Human Values. She has a Ph.D. in Development Sociology from Cornell University. JOHN SHEEHAN serves as the scientific program coordinator for biofuels and the global environment at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Envi- ronment, focusing in particular on direct and indirect consequences of biofuel production on land use across the world. Sheehan has 25 years of experience in chemical engineering, analysis and planning, including 14 years working with biomass technologies. Most recently, he served as vice president of strategy and sustainable development at LiveFuels Inc., a venture capital-funded startup based in California that focuses on algal fuels technology. Prior to that, Sheehan spent nearly two decades with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, where he conducted pioneering work on system dynamic models for strategic and policy decision-making related to biofuels. During that time, he led the Department of Energy’s assessment of its energy efficiency and renewable energy technology portfolio; conducted landmark studies of energy, air quality, greenhouse gas and

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6 APPENDIX G soil impacts of stover-to-ethanol; oversaw multidisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers; and published numerous peer-reviewed articles on the gamut of energy and environmental topics. EMMY SIMMONS serves as co-chair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. She is currently an independent consultant on international development issues, with a focus on food, agricul - ture, and Africa. She serves on the boards of several organizations engaged in international agriculture and global development more broadly: the Partner- ship to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), the Washington chapter of the Society for International Development (SID), and the Africa Center for Health and Human Security at George Washington University. Ms. Simmons co-chairs the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustain - ability at the National Academies of Science and leads a Roundtable working group on Partnerships for Sustainability. She completed a career of nearly 30 years with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2005, having served since 2002 as the Assistant Administrator for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade, a Presidentially-appointed, Senate-confirmed position. Prior to joining USAID, she worked in the Ministry of Planning and Economic Affairs in Monrovia, Liberia and taught and conducted research at Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria. She began her international career as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines from 1962-64. She holds an M.S. degree in agricul- tural economics from Cornell University and a B.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. JEFFERY STEINER is national program leader for Agricultural System Com- petitiveness and Sustainability with the USDA, Agricultural Research Service– Office of National Programs in Beltsville, MD. He leads nineteen research projects around the country that are producing new kinds of technology and systems to help producers respond to changing environmental and market con - ditions, enhance natural resources quality, and increase American food, fiber, and energy security. Jeff is also a member of the USDA Council for Sustainable Development, and represents ARS and the USDA Research, Education, and Eco- nomics mission area in other matters related to sustainability, particularly in the emerging area of agricultural based bioenergy production. He also coordinates the ARS organic agriculture portfolio. Jeff received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from California State University-Fresno, and the Ph.D. from Oregon State University. He is a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America. DAVID SWENSON is an associate scientist in Economics and a lecturer in Community and Regional Planning at Iowa State University, and a Lecturer in the

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63 APPENDIX G Graduate Program in Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Iowa. He has an M.A. in urban and regional planning from University of Iowa and an M.A. in political science from University of South Dakota. He teaches planning meth - ods and techniques, urban economics, project evaluation methods, and economic impact assessment. His primary area of research focuses on regional economic changes and their fiscal and demographic implications for communities and local governments in Iowa and in the Midwest. He has developed protocols and con- ducts targeted industry research for assisting in regional economic development. Mr. Swenson has completed numerous economic impact studies and written and presented extensively about the appropriate methods and interpretations for ap - plying impact analyses to public policies. DOUGLAS TIFFANY is an extension educator, Agricultural Business Manage- ment in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. Current research projects include analysis of production economics of ethanol and biodiesel. Patterns of energy usage by agricultural enterprises as well as emissions of greenhouse gases and the potential for carbon sequestration are continuing interests as well as international climate change treaties. For the year 2001-2002 he was awarded the Endowed Chair in Agricultural Systems by the College of Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota. Much of his research work over the past 10 years has involved analysis of energy production from agriculture as well as the levels of energy required to produce various agricultural products. Working with others, he has analyzed the impact of the Kyoto Accord on Midwestern agriculture and the cost effectiveness of various phosphorous abatement strategies. Livestock consump- tion patterns and trends of Minnesota crops have been studied as well as the transportation patterns of grains grown in the state. Decision-making tools have been developed by him through the years for ethanol plant operators, farmers considering precision agricultural technology, mining engineers trying to reduce diesel emissions, appraisers needing to discount contract for deed land transfers, and swine farmers seeking to select rations that maximize profits. Mt. Tiffany majored in agricultural economics at the University of Minnesota with a heavy emphasis on the agricultural sciences of agronomy, soils, and animal nutrition. He continued his interest in these areas with more attention to institutional aspects of production while attaining a M.S. degree from the same department. After graduation he worked in state government and in commercial banking for over a decade with most activity in appraisal and valuation of farmland. In addition, he has worked full-time as a self-employed farmer raising agronomic and vegetable crops. He joined the University of Minnesota staff in 1994. LEANN M. TIGGES is professor of Rural Sociology at the University of Wis- consin in Madison. Her research interests include economic change and labor force issues. She has conducted research on Wisconsin’s corn ethanol producers

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6 APPENDIX G with a special interest identifying the community benefits and costs of hosting an ethanol refinery. Professor Tigges has also conducted research on Wisconsin manufacturers’ labor utilization strategies and their global competitive position. She teaches courses on gender, work, and local labor markets. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Missouri. JOHN YUNKER is a program evaluation coordinator for the Minnesota Of- fice of the Legislative Auditor. His evaluation work has covered government programs in many different areas, including education, transportation, economic development, environmental protection, and health care. In recent years, his work has resulted in major reforms in the operation of the Minnesota State Lot - tery and in the Jobs Opportunity Building Zone (JOBZ) program, the state’s largest economic development program. In April 2009, he authored a report on Minnesota’s biofuel policies and programs, which provided an extensive review of the literature on the energy, environmental, and economic impacts of corn- based ethanol. Over the past 30 years, he has testified extensively to legislative committees in Minnesota and worked with executive branch agencies to imple - ment evaluation recommendations. Mr. Yunker received his B.A. in economics from Lawrence University (Wisconsin.) and his M.A. in economics from the University of Minnesota. JUDY zIEWACz is the director of the Wisconsin Office of Energy Indepen- dence (OEI) which was created by Governor Doyle on April 5, 2007. Ms. Ziewacz has 32 years of experience in the public and private sectors. Prior to OEI, she served as Deputy Secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) for 4r years. She served as chief of staff to a Wisconsin Congressman in Washington, DC; and, as executive director of na - tional cooperative development entities. She has managed the legislative agenda at the state and national levels for cooperative trade associations representing all sizes and sectors of the United States economy including Fortune 500 agriculture cooperatives and minority-owned catering businesses; farm credit banks and consumer credit unions; New York City and rural, senior housing; urban food stores and rural energy services.