Appendix B
Committee and Staff Biographies

Dr. Valentín Fuster (Chair) serves The Mount Sinai Medical Center as Director of Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health. He is the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Fuster is the General Director of the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III in Madrid, Spain. After receiving his medical degree from Barcelona University and completing an internship at Hospital Clinic in Barcelona, Dr. Fuster spent several years at the Mayo Clinic, first as a resident and later as Professor of Medicine and Consultant in Cardiology. In 1981, he joined Mount Sinai School of Medicine as Head of Cardiology. From 1991 to 1994, he was Mallinckrodt Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He returned to Mount Sinai in 1994 as Director of the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and, most recently, he has been named the Director of Mount Sinai Heart. Dr. Fuster is a past President of the American Heart Association, immediate past President of the World Heart Federation, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a former member of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Advisory Council, and former Chairman of the Fellowship Training Directors Program of the American College of Cardiology. Twenty-seven distinguished universities throughout the world have granted Dr. Fuster Honoris Causa. He has published more than 800 articles on the subjects of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis, and he has become the lead editor of two major textbooks on cardiology and of three



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 439
Appendix B Committee and Staff Biographies Dr. Valentín Fuster (Chair) serves The Mount Sinai Medical Center as Direc- tor of Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovas- cular Health. He is the Richard Gorlin, MD/Heart Research Foundation Professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Fuster is the General Director of the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Car- los III in Madrid, Spain. After receiving his medical degree from Barcelona University and completing an internship at Hospital Clinic in Barcelona, Dr. Fuster spent several years at the Mayo Clinic, first as a resident and later as Professor of Medicine and Consultant in Cardiology. In 1981, he joined Mount Sinai School of Medicine as Head of Cardiology. From 1991 to 1994, he was Mallinckrodt Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of Cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. He returned to Mount Sinai in 1994 as Director of the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and, most recently, he has been named the Director of Mount Sinai Heart. Dr. Fuster is a past President of the American Heart Association, immediate past President of the World Heart Federation, a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, a former member of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood In- stitute Advisory Council, and former Chairman of the Fellowship Training Directors Program of the American College of Cardiology. Twenty-seven distinguished universities throughout the world have granted Dr. Fuster Honoris Causa. He has published more than 800 articles on the subjects of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis, and he has become the lead editor of two major textbooks on cardiology and of three 

OCR for page 439
0 APPENDIX B books related to health for the public in Spain (bestsellers, presently being translated into English). Dr. Fuster has been appointed Editor-in-Chief of the Nature journal that focuses on cardiovascular medicine. Dr. Fuster is the only cardiologist to receive all four major research awards from the four major cardiovascular organizations: The Distinguished Researcher Award (Interamerican Society of Cardiology, 2005), the Andreas Gruntzig Scien- tific Award (European Society of Cardiology, 1992), Distinguished Scientist (American Heart Association, 2003), and the Distinguished Scientist Award (American College of Cardiology, 1993). In addition, he has received the Principe de Asturias Award of Science and Technology (the highest award given to Spanish-speaking scientists), the Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Cardiology, the Gold Heart Award (American Heart Association’s highest award), and the Gold Medal of the European Society of Cardiology (the highest award, Vienna, September 2007). Dr. Fuster has four ongoing projects as part of the World Heart Federation: “Promoting health as a priority” in children of Bogotá with Sesame Street, “Promoting health as a priority” in adults in The Island of Grenada, polypill developed in Spain for low and middle income countries, and a project with Jeffrey and Sonia Sachs focused on chronic diseases (as an addition to the Millennium project) in the African villages (Rwanda). Dr. Arun Chockalingam is the Director of Global Health and a Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He recently completed his term as the Associate Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health. Dr. Chockalingam received his Masters in Biomedical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, (Madras) Chennai, India, after which he moved to Canada and continued his studies at the Memorial University of Newfoundland. There he completed his Ph.D. and later joined the Faculty of Medicine. During his career, Dr. Chockalingam has addressed the diag- nosis, epidemiology, and effect of lifestyle on hypertension, both within and outside of Canada. Dr. Chockalingam was the President of the Ca- nadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control (now Blood Pressure Canada) for 7 years. He has been an active and influential member of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program. He is currently Secretary General of the World Hypertension League and, since 2005, has initiated and organized World Hypertension Day, an annual public aware- ness campaign, both in Canada and worldwide. Dr. Chockalingam’s areas of research are hypertension prevention and control, control of cardiovas- cular risk factors, ethnicity, gender and cardiovascular diseases, patient education, clinical trials research, methodology, and global determinants of health. In regards to heart health, hypertension, and preventive cardiology, he has organized a number of national and international conferences, has

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B published more than 100 scientific and medical papers, and has received numerous awards to highlight his achievements in these areas. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the World Heart Federation’s “White Book” on Impend- ing Global Pandemic of CVD: Focus on Developing Countries and Econo- mies in Transition (1999). Dr. Ciro A. de Quadros has dedicated his career to freeing the world of infectious diseases, especially those that disproportionately affect the health and social development of the world’s poorer countries. A pioneer in developing effective strategies for surveillance and containment, Dr. de Quadros served as the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) chief epide- miologist for smallpox eradication in Ethiopia in the 1970s. Following the global eradication of smallpox, he became the Director of the Division of Vaccines and Immunization for the Pan American Health Organization, for which he successfully directed efforts to eradicate poliomyelitis and measles from the Western Hemisphere. In 2003, Dr. de Quadros joined the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute and at present is its Executive Vice-President. He is on faculty at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and the School of Medicine at George Washington University. He publishes and presents at conferences throughout the world and has received several international awards, including the 1993 Prince Mahidol Award of Thai- land, the 2000 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal, the Order of Rio Branco from his native Brazil, and, most recently, election into the national Institute of Medicine (IOM). Dr. John W. Farquhar is Professor of Medicine and Health Research and Policy at the Stanford School of Medicine. In 1971 he began the Stanford Three Community Study, a controlled, comprehensive, community-based study of chronic disease prevention, followed by the Stanford Five City Project (1978-1995). The results and methods used in these studies have been disseminated worldwide. In 1992 he chaired the Victoria Declaration, which contained 64 policy recommendations for worldwide reduction of cardiovascular disease. He chaired the Advisory Board of the Catalonia Declaration (1997), the Singapore Declaration (2000), the Osaka Decla- ration (2001, member), and the Milan Declaration (2004, member). In 2002, he was a founding member of the International Heart Health Soci- ety, which provides policy guidance on international health. His research interests include disease prevention, epidemiology of cardiovascular dis- eases, community-based education for disease prevention, and international health. He is a member of various distinguished organizations, including the Institute of Medicine, the Society of Behavioral Medicine, and the National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention. Dr. Farquhar has authored more than 225 publications. He has received many honors related to his

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B work in disease prevention and community-based interventions, including the James D. Bruce Award for Distinguished Contributions in Preventive Medicine, the Charles A. Dana Award for Pioneering Achievements in Health, the American Heart Association’s Research Achievement Award, and the Joseph Stokes Preventive Cardiology Award. Most recently he re- ceived the Fries Prize in 2005, awarded “for the person who most improved the public’s health.” Dr. Robert C. Hornik is the Wilbur Schramm Professor of Communication and Health Policy at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He has a wide range of experience in mass media communication evaluations, ranging from breastfeeding promotion, AIDS education, and immunization and child survival projects to antidrug and domestic violence media campaigns at the community, national, and international levels. Dr. Hornik has served as a member of the IOM Com- mittee on International Nutrition Programs, the IOM Committee on Pre- vention of Obesity in Children and Youth, the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Communication for Behavior Change in the 21st Century: Improving the Health of Diverse Populations, and the NRC Com- mittee to Develop a Strategy to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking. He has received the Mayhew Derryberry Award from the American Public Health Association, the Andreasen Scholar Award in social marketing, and the Fisher Mentorship Award from the International Communication Association. He has also been a consultant to other agencies such as the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the United Nations Children’s Fund, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and the World Bank. Dr. Hornik serves on the edito- rial boards of several journals, including Social Marketing Quarterly and the Journal of Health Communication. Dr. Hornik was the Scientific Direc- tor for the evaluation of the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s Na- tional Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, and he is currently the Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s National Cancer Institute–funded Center of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research. He most recently edited Public Health Communication, and he was the author of Development Communication and co-author of Educational Reform with Television: The El Salvador Experience and Toward Reform of Program Evaluation. Dr. Hornik received a Ph.D. in communication research from Stanford University in 1973. Dr. Frank B. Hu is Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He serves as co-Director of the Program in Obesity Epidemiology and Prevention at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Hu received his

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B medical degree at Tongji Medical College in Wuhan, China, and his M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Illinois, Chicago. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. His research has focused on epidemiology and prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in both developed and developing countries. Dr. Hu is the recipient of the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award. He is also a Yangtze Scholar at Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science & Technology. Dr. Hu’s research has focused on diet and lifestyle determinants of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. He is the Principal Investiga- tor of the diabetes component of the Nurses’ Health Study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). His current research has expanded to investigate complex interactions among nutrition, biomarkers, and genetic factors in the development of diabetes and cardiovascular complications. Dr. Hu is also collaborating with researchers from China to study obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease in Chinese populations. Dr. Hu lectured on controlling noncommunicable diseases for the 2006 China Senior Health Executive Education Program at Harvard School of Public Health. He has published more than 300 original papers and reviews in peer-reviewed journals and is the principle author of the textbook Obesity Epidemiology (Oxford University Press, 2008). Dr. Peter R. Lamptey is based in Accra, Ghana, and is the President of Public Health Programs at Family Health International (FHI) with head- quarters in North Carolina. Dr. Lamptey is an internationally recognized public health physician and expert in developing countries, with particular emphasis on communicable and noncommunicable diseases. With a career at FHI spanning more than 25 years, Dr. Lamptey has been instrumental in establishing FHI as one of the world’s leading international nongovernmen- tal organizations in implementing HIV/AIDS prevention, care, treatment, and support programs. His experience in HIV/AIDS efforts internationally includes collaboration with the World Bank to design and monitor the China Health IX HIV/AIDS Project. From 1997 to 2007, Dr. Lamptey directed the 10-year Implementing AIDS Prevention and Care (IMPACT) project. The IMPACT project encompassed HIV/AIDS programs in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East. He is the former chair of the Monitoring the AIDS Pandemic (MAP) Net- work, a global network of more than 150 HIV/AIDS experts in 50 coun- tries that was formed in 1996 by the AIDS Control and Prevention project (AIDSCAP), the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights of the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Joint United Na- tions Programme on HIV/AIDS. Dr. Lamptey delivered the HIV prevention plenary speeches at the world AIDS conferences held in Berlin, Germany, in 1993 and in Durban, South Africa, in 2000. From 1991 to 1997, Dr.

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B Lamptey directed the AIDSCAP project, funded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by FHI. The largest international HIV/AIDS prevention program undertaken to date, AIDSCAP consisted of more than 800 projects in 50 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Prior to AIDSCAP, he directed AIDSTECH, also funded by USAID as a global HIV/AIDS project and implemented by FHI from 1987 to 1992. Born in Ghana, Dr. Lamptey began his career as a district medical officer there, first in the Salaga district, where he was re- sponsible for preventive and clinical health services for 200,000 individuals, and then for the USAID-funded Danfa Comprehensive Rural Health Fam- ily Planning Project. He received his medical degree from the University of Ghana, a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a doctorate in public health from the Harvard School of Public Health. Prof. Jean Claude Mbanya is Vice Dean and Professor of Endocrinology and Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Consultant Physician and Chief of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases Unit, Hôpital Central Yaoundé, Cameroon; and Direc- tor, Health of Population in Transition Research Group, Cameroon. He is a member of the WHO African Advisory Committee on Health Research and Development, the WHO Expert Advisory Panel on Chronic Degen- erative Diseases Diabetes, and the WHO Committee on Classification and Diagnosis of Diabetes, and he is President-elect and member of the Board of Management of the International Diabetes Federation. His research interest is in the epidemiology of noncommunicable diseases, especially diabetes and its complications, ethnopharmacology and molecular biology of diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and thyroid diseases and their impact on the health care systems of developing countries. He has a wide span of expertise, but his current focus is on clinical application of basic research and equity of access to care and education and the integration of diabetes and endocrine diseases in the primary health care activities of developing countries. Prof. Mbanya trained in Yaoundé, Cameroon, and Newcastle upon Tyne, England. He is the author of 15 book chapters and more than 75 published papers. Prof. Anne Mills is Professor of Health Economics and Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Head of the Department of Public Health and Policy. She has more than 30 years of experience of collaborative research on the health systems of low and middle income countries, and she has researched and published widely in the fields of health economics and health systems. Her most recent research interests

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B have been in the organization and financing of health systems, including evaluation of contractual relationships between public and private sectors, and in economic analysis of disease control activities and the appropriate roles of public and private sectors, especially for scaling up malaria control efforts. She has had extensive involvement in supporting capacity develop- ment in health economics in low and middle income countries, for example through supporting the health economics research funding activities of the WHO Tropical Disease Research Programme and chairing the Board of the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research. She founded, and is Direc- tor of, the Health Economics and Financing Programme, which together with its many research partners has an extensive programme of research focused on increasing knowledge of how best to improve health systems in low and middle income countries. She has advised multilateral, bilateral, and government agencies on numerous occasions; acted as specialist advisor to the House of Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology’s inquiry into the use of science in UK international development policy; was a member of WHO’s Commission on Macro-economics and Health and co- chair of its working group “Improving the Health Outcomes of the Poor”; wrote the communicable disease paper for the first Copenhagen Consensus; and was a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Economics of Antimalarial Drugs. In 2006 she was awarded a CBE for services to medicine and elected Foreign Associate of the IOM. Dr. Jagat Narula is the Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Divi- sion of Cardiology at the University of California (UC), Irvine. He has also served as the Associate Dean for Research at UC Irvine. Dr. Narula completed his cardiology training at the All India Institute of Medical Sci- ences, Delhi, India, and relocated to Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 1989. After completing his cardiology, heart failure transplantation, and nuclear cardiology fellowships, he joined the faculty at Massachusetts General. In 1997, he moved to the Philadelphia Hahnemann University School of Medicine. At Hahnemann, he was the Thomas J. Vischer Professor of Medicine, Chief of Division of Cardiology, Vice-Chairman of Medicine, Director of the Heart Failure and Transplan- tation Center, and Director of the Center for Molecular Cardiology until 2003, when he moved to UC Irvine. Dr. Narula has contributed immensely to cardiovascular imaging from experimental molecular imaging to perfect- ing the techniques for bedside application of various noninvasive imaging modalities and demonstration of their eventual usefulness for prevention of cardiovascular diseases at the population level. He is considered to be an authority in the fields of programmed cell death in heart failure and atherosclerotic plaques that are likely to lead to acute coronary events. He has also contributed substantially to the field of rheumatic fever and rheu-

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B matic heart diseases. His research is funded, in part, by National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants. Dr. Narula has authored or presented more than 700 research manuscripts and edited 25 books or journal supplements. He has been awarded as “best young investigator” on several occasions. He serves on various committees of the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. Dr. Narula is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology—Cardiovascular Imaging and an associate editor of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. He was the founding editor of Heart Failure Clinics of North America. Dr. Rachel A. Nugent is the Deputy Director of Global Health for the Center for Global Development (CGD). She is chair of the CGD work- ing group on drug resistance, manages CGD programs on population and economic development, and conducts research on the economics of chronic diseases in developing countries. She also provides economic and policy expertise on a range of other global health topics. She has 25 years of ex- perience as a development economist, managing and carrying out research and policy analysis in the fields of health, agriculture, and the environment. Prior to joining CGD, Dr. Nugent worked at the Population Reference Bu- reau, the Fogarty International Center of the NIH, and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. She also served as Associate Professor and Chair of the Economics Department at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. Dr. Nugent’s recent publications address the cost- effectiveness of noncommunicable disease interventions, the economic im- pacts of chronic disease, and the health impacts of fiscal policies. Dr. John W. Peabody is the Deputy Director of Global Health Sciences, where he heads health policy activities. He is also a Senior Vice President and Medical Director at Sg2, a health intelligence company advising hos- pitals and physicians on how to measure and advance health care delivery, finance, and planning. Dr. Peabody is currently a Professor in the Depart- ments of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Medicine and has been a member of the University of California (UC) faculty since 1995. Dr. Peabody holds a joint appointment in the Department of Health Services at UC Los Angeles in the School of Public Health and holds an honorary faculty appointment at Tulane University. He spent 9 years at RAND working as a Senior Scien- tist and Principal Investigator. Before RAND, Dr. Peabody worked for the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva and Manila for 3 years; he also spent 2 years as Director for Project Hope in China. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians (1999). Dr. Peabody has presented to a congressional panel on health and the environment and has also served on previous national panels and blue ribbon committees including the IOM

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B Committee on Quality of Care. Dr. Peabody is currently the Principal Inves- tigator on a large NIH-funded research project on children where he leads a broad-based social policy experiment to evaluate the impact of insurance and clinical practice on a variety of health outcomes in the Philippines. Dr. Peabody has published more than 190 papers, articles, and books on international health policy, quality of care, measuring and changing pro- vider practice, and changing financial incentives in health care. He is the lead author of Policy and Health: Implications for Development in Asia, published by Cambridge University Press. Dr. Peabody is a board-certified internist. He received his M.D. from UC San Francisco, his D.T.M.&H. from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and his M.Phil. and Ph.D. in public policy from the RAND Graduate School. Prof. K. Srinath Reddy is the President of the Public Health Foundation of India and until recently headed the Department of Cardiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS). He graduated from Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, and later trained at AIIMS, Delhi, where he received his M.D. (medicine) and D.M. (cardiology) degrees, with high aca- demic honors. Professor Reddy is a clinical cardiologist and is also trained in epidemiology (at McMaster University, Canada). Professor Reddy has been involved in several major international and national research studies, including the INTERSALT global study of blood pressure and electrolytes, Indian Council of Medical Research–commissioned national collabora- tive studies on Epidemiology of Coronary Heart Disease and Community Control of Rheumatic Heart Disease, and the INTERHEART global study on risk factors of myocardial infarction. Professor Reddy served as the Coordinator of the Initiative for Cardiovascular Health Research in the Developing Countries (IC Health), a global partnership program, and pres- ently chairs the Board of IC Health. He has served on many WHO expert panels and as Chair of the Scientific Council on Epidemiology of the World Heart Federation, and he has recently been elected to serve as Chair of the Federation’s Foundation Advisory Board. Professor Reddy edited the National Medical Journal of India for 10 years and is on the editorial boards of several international and national journals. He has represented India in intergovernmental treaty negotiations on the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and the Conference of Parties of that treaty. Professor Reddy has been active in organizing school-based health education programs under the Health Related Information Dissemi- nation Amongst Youth Student Health Action Network (HRIDAY–SHAN) program, which he initiated in 1992. HRIDAY has won international recognition for its innovative programs of health awareness and advocacy and was awarded the WHO Global Tobacco Free World Award in 2002. He recently organized the first ever Global Youth Meet on Health (GYM

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B 2006) in New Delhi and facilitated the launch of the Youth For Health (Y4H) global network for health advocacy and action. He has more than 250 scientific publications in international and Indian peer-reviewed jour- nals. Professor Reddy was awarded the WHO Director General’s Award for Global Leadership in Tobacco Control (2003), was conferred the national award PADMA BHUSHAN (one of the highest civilian awards conferred by the Government of India) by the President of India (2005), and was conferred the Queen Elizabeth Medal for 2005 by The Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, United Kingdom Professor Reddy is a member of the Institute of Medicine. In 2009 he received the American Cancer Society’s Luther Terry Award for Outstanding Leadership in Global Tobacco Con- trol and the Honorary Fellowship of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Sylvie Stachenko is currently the Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta. Dr. Stachenko earned a B.S. degree in biophys- ics (1971) and an M.D. degree (1975), both from McGill University, and completed her residency in family medicine at the Université de Montréal (1977). She earned a master’s degree in epidemiology and health services administration from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1985. Dr. Stachenko was an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medi- cine at the Université de Montréal, where she served as Research Director from 1984 to 1988. In 1988, she joined the federal government with the Department of Health and Welfare and, in 1989, was appointed Director, Preventive Health Services. From 1997 to 2002, Dr. Stachenko worked with the WHO Regional Office for Europe, located in Copenhagen, Denmark, as its Director of Health Policy and Services. She was then appointed Director General in the Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control at the Public Health Agency of Canada, a position she held until 2004. Dr. Derek Yach is Senior Vice President of Global Health Policy at PepsiCo, where he leads the Human Sustainability Leadership Team and engagement with major international policy, research, and scientific groups. Previously he headed global health at the Rockefeller Foundation and was Profes- sor of Public Health and Head of the Division of Global Health at Yale University. Dr. Yach is a former Executive Director of WHO. Dr. Yach has spearheaded several major efforts to improve global health. At WHO he served as Cabinet Director under Director-General Gro Harlem Brundtland. Dr. Yach helped place tobacco control, nutrition, and chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease prominently on the agenda of governments, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector. He led development of WHO’s first treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and the development of the Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity.

OCR for page 439
 APPENDIX B Dr. Yach established the Centre for Epidemiological Research at the South African Medical Research Council, which focused on quantifying inequali- ties and the impact of urbanization on health. He has authored or coau- thored more than 200 articles covering the breadth of global health issues. Dr. Yach serves on several advisory boards, including those of the Clinton Global Initiative, the World Economic Forum, the Pan American Health and Education Foundation, the Oxford Health Alliance, and Vitality USA. Dr. Yach received his M.B.Ch.B. from the University of Cape Town Medi- cal School in 1979 and completed his clinical internship in medicine and surgery at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town in 1980. Dr. Yach also received an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene in 1985. In 2007 Georgetown University presented Dr. Yach with Honoris Causa (D.Sc.). Dr. Yach is a South African national. IOM STAFF Dr. Bridget B. Kelly is a Program Officer with the Board on Global Health. She first joined the National Academies as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow. Prior to joining the Board on Global Health, she worked in the Board on Children, Youth, and Families as staff for the Committee on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults, the Committee on De- pression, Parenting Practices, and the Healthy Development of Children, and the Committee on Strengthening Benefit-Cost Methodology for the Evaluation of Early Childhood Interventions. She received her B.A. from Williams College and completed an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University. In ad- dition to her work in science and health, she has more than 10 years of experience in grassroots nonprofit arts administration. Collin Weinberger is a research associate at the Board on Global Health. Prior to joining the IOM, he was a Communications Associate at Global Health Strategies, a communications and advocacy consultancy specializing in diseases of the developing world. He also spent a year as a volunteer with Partners in Health/Socios en Salud in Lima, Peru, where he worked with the organization’s children’s health, multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS programs. He received his bachelors degree in health and societies from the University of Pennsylvania. Louise Jordan is a research assistant for the Board on Global Health. She received a B.S. degree from the University of Utah. Prior to joining the Board on Global Health, she worked for the Board on Population Health as staff for the Committee on Review of Priorities in the National Vaccine

OCR for page 439
0 APPENDIX B Plan and the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. Kristen Danforth is a Senior Program Assistant with the Board on Global Health. She received her bachelor’s degree in international health from Georgetown University in 2008. Dr. Patrick Kelley joined the IOM in July 2003 as the Director of the Board on Global Health. He has subsequently also been appointed the Director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has over- seen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convening activities on subjects as wideranging as the evaluation of the U.S. emergency plan for international AIDS relief, the role of border quarantine programs for migrants in the 21st century, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infec- tions, and the programmatic approach to cancer in low and middle income countries. He also directs a unique capacity building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over 10 years aims to strengthen the capacity of African academies to advise their governments on scientific matters. Prior to joining the National Academies, Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last Department of Defense (DoD) position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibil- ity entailed managing surveillance and capacity building partnerships with numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in more than 45 developing countries. Dr. Kelley is an experienced com- municator, having lectured in English or Spanish in more than 20 countries and having published more than 64 scholarly papers, book chapters, and monographs. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.