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removed. For example, attempts to reduce sodium in natural and processed cheese products while maintaining desirable textures and achieving a safe product have been successful using new technologies, such as ultrafiltration (Reddy and Marth, 1991; Van der Veer, 1985). Similarly, in enhanced meat, some brine injection may be desirable to increase the palatability of leaner cuts of meat (Detienne and Wicker, 1999) and help consumers avoid fattier meats that are naturally more tender. However, it is likely that, for many of these products, additional brine is added to further reduce moisture loss (or purge) that normally occurs in the product during its retail shelf life. The benefit that may result from additional brine at that point may be more for economic than sensory reasons, and the brine may not be needed to create acceptable products. In other products, additional salt may be added for enhanced taste and flavor.

Table 4-3 shows the difference in sodium content of similar foods in

TABLE 4-3 Differences in Sodium Content of Similar Foods

Food

Serving Size (g)

Sodium (mg)

Sodium (mg/100 g product)

Hams

 

 

 

Carl Buddig Honey Ham

56

460

821

Oscar Mayer Baked Cooked

63

760

1,206

Oscar Mayer Shaved Smoked

51

640

1,255

Pork Sausage, Sage

 

 

 

365 Brown & Serve Links

56

380

679

Jimmy Dean Premium

56

420

750

Bob Evans Savory

56

570

1,018

Turkey, Fresh or Frozen

 

 

 

Butterball Fresh Whole Turkey Breast

112

55

49

Shadybrook Farms Turkey Breast Cutlets

112

240

214

Marval Prime Young Turkey Breast (frozen)

112

390

348

Butterball Frozen Fully Cooked Whole Turkey Breast

84

500

595

Cheese, Cheddar, Sliced

 

 

 

Kraft Cracker Barrel Natural Sharp Slices

28

180

643

Great Value (Wal-Mart) Mild

19

135

711

Kraft Deli Deluxe Sharp Slices

28

440

1,571

Buns, Hot Dog

 

 

 

Pepperidge Farm

50

190

380

Wonder 8

43

210

488

Great Value (Wal-Mart) Enriched

43

230

535

NOTE: g = gram; mg = milligram.

SOURCE: CSPI, 2008. “Salt Assault: Brand-name Comparisons of Processed Foods.” Reprinted with permission.



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