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Experiences with intervention studies should be transferred to clinical and/or community settings after reviewing or evaluating and adapting, if necessary, strategies, methods, and materials

Gradual “silent” or “transparent” lowering of salt or sodium in the food supply will need to occur along with the opportunity for effective marketing strategies and the promotion of reduced-sodium as well as low-sodium, low-salt, and no-salt food products. These recommendations are applicable to the food production industry, as well as restaurant, catering, and foodservice industries

Data from completed clinical trials should be analyzed for the adequacy of simpler methods (e.g., casual urine collections, chloride titrator strips) as measures of sodium intake and for the validity of dietary recalls in order to consider the best feasible methods for individual and national-level assessments of sodium intake

Other research needs identified in the areas of food technology; basic mechanisms of salt taste; and knowledge, attitudes, and skills of the public

 

1997

The Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (NHLBI, 1997)

Reduce sodium intake to ≤ 100 mmol/d (2,400 mg sodium or 6 g sodium chloride)

 

2002

National High Blood Pressure Education Program (update of 1993 report) (NHLBI, 2002)

Reduce dietary sodium intake to no more than 100 mmol/d (approximately 2,400 mg of sodium or 6 g of sodium chloride)

All Americans

2003

The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (NHLBI, 2004)

Reduce sodium intake to no more than 100 mmol/d (2,400 mg sodium or 6 g sodium chloride)

 



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