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FIGURE 3-7 Multiple emulsion consisting of fat droplets dispersed in the outer phase of sodium-containing water and other water-soluble components. To expand the size of the fat droplets and create less need for the sodium-containing outer phase, sodium-free water droplets are dispersed within the fat.

FIGURE 3-7 Multiple emulsion consisting of fat droplets dispersed in the outer phase of sodium-containing water and other water-soluble components. To expand the size of the fat droplets and create less need for the sodium-containing outer phase, sodium-free water droplets are dispersed within the fat.

SOURCE: Adapted from Beeren, 2009.

Potassium chloride has been proposed as a salt substitute either alone or in combination with table salt. However, in addition to tasting salty, many people find potassium chloride bitter (Beauchamp and Stein, 2008). Nonetheless, the interest in increasing potassium consumption among Americans has resulted in considerable interest in pursuing potassium chloride as a salt substitute. As shown in Appendix D, Table D-1, many foods use potassium chloride mixed with sodium chloride in up to a 50:50 ratio; a significant increase in bitterness is observed when a higher ratio is used (Desmond, 2006; Gou et al., 1996). Other salt substitutes have been proposed, but most of the claims remain scientifically unverified (see Appendix D, Table D-1).



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