Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews

Bernard D. Goldstein (Chair) is dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Previously, he served as the director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He was also principal investigator for the Consortium of Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1983-1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chair of the National Institutes of Health Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clear Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He has also served on numerous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including being chair of the Committee on the Role of the Physician in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the Committee on Biomarkers in Environmental Health Research, and the Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology. He chairs the Committee to Review the NIOSH Hearing Loss Research Program. Dr. Goldstein is a member of IOM and chaired its Section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology. He is a member and past president of the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a member and fellow of the American College of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (whose Robert A. Kehoe Award of Merit he has received) and a member of the Collegium Ramazzini, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Society of Toxicology, and the American Public Health Association. Dr. Goldstein earned an MD from New York University.


Frederic Bois is scientific officer for the Chronic Risks Division of the Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS) in France. Dr. Bois’s expertise is in the development, statistical analysis, and application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models; Bayesian analysis of toxicologic



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 53
Appendix A Biographic Information on the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews Bernard D. Goldstein (Chair) is dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Previously, he served as the director of the Environ- mental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, a joint program of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Den- tistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He was also princi- pal investigator for the Consortium of Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Partici- pation. Dr. Goldstein was assistant administrator for research and development in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1983-1985. His past activities include serving as a member and chair of the National Institutes of Health Toxicology Study Section and EPA’s Clear Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He has also served on numerous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including being chair of the Committee on the Role of the Physician in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the Committee on Biomarkers in Environmental Health Research, and the Commit- tee on Risk Assessment Methodology. He chairs the Committee to Review the NIOSH Hearing Loss Research Program. Dr. Goldstein is a member of IOM and chaired its Section on Public Health, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology. He is a member and past president of the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a member and fellow of the American College of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (whose Robert A. Kehoe Award of Merit he has received) and a member of the Collegium Ramazzini, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Society of Toxicology, and the American Public Health Association. Dr. Goldstein earned an MD from New York University. Frederic Bois is scientific officer for the Chronic Risks Division of the Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS) in France. Dr. Bois’s expertise is in the development, statistical analysis, and application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models; Bayesian analysis of toxicologic 53

OCR for page 53
54 Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment: A Symposium Summary or epidemiologic data; dose-response modeling; decision analysis; and risk as- sessment. Dr. Bois has been head of the toxicology unit at INERIS and staff scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. He is a member of the French Committee for Precaution and Prevention, the Scientific Committee of the French Agency for Environmental and Occupational Health, the Society for Mathematical Biology, the European Science Foundation-EERO Association, the American Chemical Society, the French Statistical Society, and the French National Association for Technological Research. He has served as a reviewer for a number of scientific journals—including Environmental Health Perspectives, Risk Analysis, the Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharma- ceutics, the Human and Ecological Risk Assessment Journal, and Toxicology and Industrial Health—and for the National Science Foundation. Dr. Bois earned a PhD in pharmacy from the University of Nancy and a PhD in toxicol- ogy from the University of Metz, both in France. Michael Brauer is a professor and director of the School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene of the University of British Columbia. His research in- terests include assessment of exposure to air pollutants, application of advanced exposure techniques to assess the health effects of air pollution, air pollution from mobile sources and vegetation fires, and air quality and health in develop- ing countries. He has been a member of National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including the IOM Committee on Gulf War and Health: Literature Review of Selected Environmental Particulates, Pollutants, and Synthetic Chemical Compounds and the National Research Council Com- mittee to Review NARSTO’s Scientific Assessment of Airborne Particulate Matter. Dr. Brauer received his ScD from the Harvard School of Public Health. Richard Corley is laboratory fellow in the biologic monitoring and biologic modeling group at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy in Richland, WA. Dr. Corley specializes in the de- velopment of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, real-time breath analysis, dermal and inhalation bioavailability, and the development of three- dimensional computational fluid-dynamic models of the respiratory system. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers on oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicology; modes of action of a variety of industrial and consumer chemicals; and pharmacokinetic modeling and its applications in human health risk assess- ments. Dr. Corley served on the National Research Council Committee to As- sess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion. He received a PhD in en- vironmental toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Linda Cowan is George Lynn Cross Professor in the Department of Biostatis- tics and Epidemiology at the University of the Oklahoma Health Sciences Cen- ter. Her research interests include cardiovascular disease and the relative impor- tance of risk factors in American Indian men and women, neurologic disorders, and perinatal epidemiology. Her recent research includes analysis of risk-factor

OCR for page 53
55 Appendix A profiles for early-onset and late-onset coronary heart disease in American Indi- ans, investigation of the role of environmental toxicants and congenital hearing loss, and studies in west Africa of the prevalence of and risk factors for epilepsy associated with neurocysticercosis. Dr. Cowan has served on several National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including the Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion and the Committee to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of the Anthrax Vaccine, and she is a member of the IOM Board on Military and Veterans Health. She earned a PhD in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University. Kenny S. Crump is a principal with ENVIRON. He has over 25 years of ex- perience in assessing risk related to exposure to toxic materials. Statistical mod- els for assessing risk developed by Dr. Crump have been widely used by regula- tory agencies and private groups. He has served on science advisory boards of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Center for Toxico- logical Research, the Mickey Leland National Urban Air Toxics Research Cen- ter, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and on several committees of the National Research Council, including the Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology and the Committee on Institutional Means for As- sessment of Risks to Public Health. He has experience in assessing risk posed by exposure to many toxic substances, including asbestos and dioxin. Dr. Crump was a member of the EPA Science Advisory Board Dioxin Reassessment Re- view Committee on two occasions and was an adviser to the Food and Agricul- ture Organization and World Health Organization Committee on Food Additives that assessed risk posed by dioxin in food. He earned a PhD in mathematics from Montana State University. Lynn R. Goldman, a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she fo- cuses on environmental health policy, public-health practice, and children’s en- vironmental health. Dr. Goldman previously served as assistant administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances. During her tenure at EPA, Dr. Goldman was responsible for the nation’s pesticide, toxic-substances, and pollution-prevention laws and was successful in promoting children’s health issues and furthering the interna- tional agenda for global chemical safety. Before joining EPA, Dr. Goldman served in several positions in the California Department of Health Services, most recently as head of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Dis- ease Control. She has served on numerous boards and expert committees, in- cluding the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Com- mittee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. She has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Identifying and Assessing Unintended Effects of Genetically Engineered Foods on Human Health, the Committee on Clinical Trial Registries, and the Committee to Evalu-

OCR for page 53
56 Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment: A Symposium Summary ate the Hazardous Materials Management Program of the Bureau of Land Man- agement. She is vice chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences and chair of the IOM Gulf War and Health study. Dr. Goldman received her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. Philip J. Landrigan is director of the Center for Children’s Health and the Envi- ronment, Ethel H. Wise Professor and chair of the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, and director of environmental and occupational medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He also holds a professorship in pediatrics at Mount Sinai. From 1970 to 1985, Dr. Landrigan served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, where he served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer and then as a medical epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At CDC, Dr. Landrigan participated in epidemi- ologic studies of measles and rubella, directed research and developed activities for the Global Smallpox Eradication Program, and established and directed the Environmental Hazards Branch of the Bureau of Epidemiology. From 1979 to 1985, as director of the Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations, and Field Studies of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, he directed the U.S. national program in occupational epidemiology. He is editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine and previously was editor of Envi- ronmental Research. From 1995 to 1997, Dr. Landrigan served on the Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses. From 1997 to 1998, he served as senior adviser to the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on children’s health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on numerous National Research Council and IOM commit- tees, including the Committee on Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children, the committee for the Conference on Human Health and Global Climate Change, the Committee on Biologic Markers, and the Committee on Neurotoxicology and Models for Assessing Risk. Dr. Landrigan earned an MD from Harvard Medical School and a DIH from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Thomas A. Louis is professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research interests include risk assessment, envi- ronmental health and public policy, and development of related statistical ap- proaches. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Louis serves on the Health Review Committee of the Health Effects Institute and on the Environ- mental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board Drinking Water Commit- tee. Previous and current National Research Council and Institute of Medicine (IOM) service includes membership on the Committee on the Effects of Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollut- ants, the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics, the Committee on National Statistics, the board of IOM’s Medical Follow-up Agency, the Panel to Assess the Health Consequences of Service in the Persian Gulf War, the Panel

OCR for page 53
57 Appendix A on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, and the Committee on the Use of Third-Party Toxicity Research with Human Research Participants. Dr. Louis earned a PhD in mathematical statistics from Columbia University. Nu-May Ruby Reed is a staff toxicologist with the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) Department of Pesticide Regulation, where she is the lead person on risk-assessment issues in the Health Assessment Section. Her research interests are in evaluating health risks and developing dietary- assessment guidelines for pesticides. She has been on several Cal/EPA working groups that initiate, research, and revise risk-assessment guidelines and policies. Dr. Reed represented her department in task forces on community concerns and emergency response, risk-management guidance, and public education. She is also a lecturer on health risk assessment at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Reed served on the National Research Council Subcommittee on Fluoride in Drinking Water. She received her PhD from the University of California, Davis and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. Lorenz Rhomberg is a principal with Gradient Corporation. He is an expert in quantitative risk assessment, including dose-response analysis, pharmacokinetic modeling, and probabilistic methods, with special expertise in chlorinated sol- vents and endocrine-active agents. Before joining Gradient, Dr. Rhomberg was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and at the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Rhomberg is active in professional groups and environ- mental policy development, focusing on the interpretation of toxicologic data in human health risk assessment through service on panels sponsored by govern- ment, industry, and such organizations as the International Life Sciences Insti- tute. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Assuring the Safety of the Defense Department’s Mail, the Committee on Testing and Evaluation of Standoff Chemical Agent Detectors, and the Subcommittee on Manufactured Vitreous Fibers. Dr. Rhomberg earned his PhD in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Joyce Tsuji is a principal with Exponent’s Health Sciences Practice and is a board-certified toxicologist with 19 years of experience in toxicology and risk assessment on projects in the United States and internationally for corporations, trade associations, regulatory agencies, and state and local municipalities. Her research interests include exposure assessment and toxicology of a variety of chemicals, including those from industrial releases and in consumer products. She also has experience in design and direction of exposure studies involving health education, environmental sampling, and biomonitoring of populations potentially exposed to chemicals in soil, water, and the food chain. Dr. Tsuji has served on expert committees for the National Research Council, the Environ- mental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army, and the state of Washington. Her Research Council service has included membership on the Committees on Cop-

OCR for page 53
58 Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment: A Symposium Summary per in Drinking Water, Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines, Emergency and Con- tinuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants, and Submarine Escape Action Levels. She is currently serving on the Committee on Toxicology and the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews. She received her PhD with a focus in physiology and ecology from the Univer- sity of Washington.