Appendix B
Biographic Information on the Planning Committee for a Symposium on Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment

Lorenz R. Rhomberg (Chair) is a principal with Gradient Corporation, an environmental sciences consulting firm. He is an expert in quantitative risk assessment, including dose-response analysis, pharmacokinetic modeling, and probabilistic methods, with special expertise in chlorinated solvents. His focus includes science policy and methodology for human health risk assessment, including approaches to weight of toxicologic evidence for human hazard and cross-species extrapolation. Before joining Gradient, Dr. Rhomberg was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and also worked at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Rhomberg is active in professional groups and environmental policy development, focusing on current issues in the interpretation of toxicologic data in human health risk assessment through service on panels sponsored by government, industry, and such organizations as the International Life Sciences Institute. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Assuring the Safety of the Defense Department’s Mail, the Committee on Testing and Evaluation of Standoff Chemical Agent Detectors, and the Subcommittee on Manufactured Vitreous Fibers, and he is a member of the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews. Dr. Rhomberg earned his PhD in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.


Elaine M. Faustman is a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine and directs the Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication. Her research interests include understanding mechanisms of developmental and reproductive toxicants, characterizing in vitro techniques for developmental-toxicology assessment, and developing biologically based dose-response models for noncancer risk assessment. Her research expertise includes the development of tools for incorporating new scientific findings into risk-assessment decisions.



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Appendix B Biographic Information on the Planning Committee for a Symposium on Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment Lorenz R. Rhomberg (Chair) is a principal with Gradient Corporation, an envi- ronmental sciences consulting firm. He is an expert in quantitative risk assess- ment, including dose-response analysis, pharmacokinetic modeling, and prob- abilistic methods, with special expertise in chlorinated solvents. His focus includes science policy and methodology for human health risk assessment, in- cluding approaches to weight of toxicologic evidence for human hazard and cross-species extrapolation. Before joining Gradient, Dr. Rhomberg was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and also worked at the U.S. En- vironmental Protection Agency. Dr. Rhomberg is active in professional groups and environmental policy development, focusing on current issues in the inter- pretation of toxicologic data in human health risk assessment through service on panels sponsored by government, industry, and such organizations as the Inter- national Life Sciences Institute. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Assuring the Safety of the Defense Department’s Mail, the Committee on Testing and Evaluation of Standoff Chemical Agent Detectors, and the Subcommittee on Manufactured Vitreous Fibers, and he is a member of the Standing Committee on Risk Analy- sis Issues and Reviews. Dr. Rhomberg earned his PhD in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Elaine M. Faustman is a professor of environmental and occupational health sciences at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Commu- nity Medicine and directs the Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communica- tion. Her research interests include understanding mechanisms of developmental and reproductive toxicants, characterizing in vitro techniques for developmental- toxicology assessment, and developing biologically based dose-response models for noncancer risk assessment. Her research expertise includes the development of tools for incorporating new scientific findings into risk-assessment decisions. 59

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60 Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment: A Symposium Summary Dr. Faustman is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Ad- vancement of Science and of the Society for Risk Analysis. She has also been involved in several National Research Council committees, including the Com- mittee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines, the Committee on Developmental Toxicology, and the Committee on Toxicology. Dr. Faustman received a PhD in toxicology from Michigan State University. Lynn R. Goldman, a pediatrician and epidemiologist, is a professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she focuses on environmental health policy, public-health practice, and children’s environ- mental health. Dr. Goldman previously served as the assistant administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Prevention, Pesti- cides and Toxic Substances. During her tenure at EPA, Dr. Goldman was re- sponsible for the nation’s pesticide, toxic-substances, and pollution-prevention laws, and she was successful in promoting children’s health issues and further- ing the international agenda for global chemical safety. Before joining EPA, Dr. Goldman served in several positions in the California Department of Health Services, most recently as head of the Division of Environmental and Occupa- tional Disease Control. She has served on numerous boards and expert commit- tees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Acad- emy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. She has also served as a member of numerous National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Identifying and Assessing Unintended Effects of Genetically Engineered Foods on Human Health, the Committee on Clinical Trial Registries, and the Committee to Evaluate the Hazardous Materials Management Program of the Bureau of Land Management. She is vice chair of the Institute of Medi- cine (IOM) Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, chair of the IOM Committee on Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Acute Coronary Events, and a member of the NRC Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews. Dr. Goldman received her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. Michael Lawton is an associate research fellow and head of the Molecular Toxicology Group at Pfizer in Groton, CT. His molecular-toxicology laboratory applies molecular approaches in support of predictive toxicology, identifies mo- lecular biomarkers, and investigates mechanistic toxicology for early- and late- stage safety assessment. Dr. Lawton participates in the Vascular Injury Working Group of the external Predicative Safety Testing Consortium and supports the Internal Hepatic and Vascular Injury Project teams. He is also the principal in- vestigator for several external technology collaborations. He is a member of the Society of Toxicology and councilor of its Drug Discovery Toxicology Spe- cialty Section. Dr. Lawton received a PhD in toxicology from North Carolina State University.

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61 Appendix B George D. Leikauf is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Oc- cupational Health of the University of Pittsburgh. His research investigates the functional genomics of acute lung injury, asthma, and chronic obstructive pul- monary disease. He is interested in uncovering the genetic basis of increased susceptibility to pulmonary epithelial injury and repair and in examining the transcriptional regulation of molecular targets. Dr. Leikauf has served on nu- merous national and international committees, including the National Institutes of Health’s National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council and Cen- ter for Scientific Review Advisory Committee, the American Physiological So- ciety’s Perkins Memorial Fund Committee, the American Thoracic Society’s Program Committee, and the International Advisory Committee for the 8th and 9th Inhalation Symposiums. He has also served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Applications of Toxicogenomics Technologies to Predictive Toxicology. Dr. Leikauf received a PhD in environmental health sciences from the New York University Medical Center. Joel G. Pounds is a senior staff scientist in cell biology and biochemistry in the Biological Sciences Division and science adviser to the Environmental Bio- markers Initiative of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and di- rector of the Center for Novel Biomarkers of Response Genes (Genes and Envi- ronment Initiative, Exposure Biology Program) funded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Pounds has directed research programs in government (at the Na- tional Center for Toxicological Research, 1977-1985), national laboratories (at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1985-1990), and academe (at Wayne State Uni- versity, 1990-1999). His current research includes the use of mass-spectrometry- based proteomic and nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based metabonomic instrumen- tation for characterization of biologic responses of pulmonary disease in humans and in experimental animals, including response to engineered nanomaterials. Dr. Pounds received a PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Wis- consin. Joyce S. Tsuji is a principal with Exponent’s Health Sciences Practice and is a board-certified toxicologist and fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. She has over 20 years of experience in toxicology and risk-assessment projects in the United States and internationally for corporations, trade associations, regula- tory agencies, and state and local municipalities. Particular interests include expo- sure assessment and the toxicology of a variety of chemicals, including those from industrial releases and in consumer products. She has specific experience in design and direction of exposure studies involving health education, environmental sam- pling, and biomonitoring of populations potentially exposed to chemicals in soil, water, and the food chain. Dr. Tsuji has served on expert committees for the Na- tional Research Council, the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army, and the state of Washington. Her Research Council service has included member- ship on the Committees on Copper in Drinking Water, Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines, Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected

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62 Toxicity-Pathway-Based Risk Assessment: A Symposium Summary Submarine Contaminants, and Submarine Escape Action Levels. She is currently serving on the Committee on Toxicology and the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews. Dr. Tsuji received her PhD with a focus in physiol- ogy and ecology from the University of Washington. Lauren Zeise is chief of the Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Branch of the California Environmental Protection Agency. She oversees a vari- ety of risk-assessment activities, including development of approaches for as- sessing cumulative impacts, nanotechnology, green chemistry, safer alternatives, susceptible populations; cancer and reproductive-toxicant assessments; health risk characterizations for environmental media, food, and consumer products; and her department’s biomonitoring activities. Dr. Zeise has served on advisory boards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the World Health Organization, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She has also served on the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Institute of Medicine Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and Committee on Evaluation of Presumptive Disability Decision-Making Process for Veterans, and several NRC committees, including the Committee on Toxicity Testing and Assessment of Environmental Agents, the Committee on Improving Risk Analy- sis Approaches Used by U.S. EPA, the Committee on Risk Characterization, and the Committee on Comparative Toxicology of Naturally Occurring Carcinogens. She is a member, fellow, and councilor of the Society of Risk Analysis and re- ceived the society’s Outstanding Risk Practitioner Award in 2008. Dr. Zeise received her PhD from Harvard University.