Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Andrew Baskin, M.D., serves as Aetna’s National Medical Director for Quality and Provider Performance Measurement. He is responsible for initiatives to measure and improve quality of care, establishing programs that create incentives for more effective and efficient care, organizing the collection and reporting for the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS), participating in multistakeholder efforts to aggregate data to increase the integrity of results, and establishing performance-based networks. Prior to serving in this role, Dr. Baskin served in various medical director roles at Aetna, gaining experience and expertise in clinical and coverage policy development, benefit and plan design, establishing coding and reimbursement policy, disease management program operations, and physician relations. He completed residency training and is board certified in internal medicine. Prior to joining Aetna, Dr. Baskin practiced as a primary care general internist in the Philadelphia suburbs.


Michael B. Blank, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Blank received his B.A. with distinction in psychology from the University of Rochester and his M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Blank’s research and writing focus on integration of health and mental health services delivery systems including treatment for comorbid illness such as HIV/AIDS. Dr. Blank’s primary affiliation is with the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research in the Psychiatry Department. He also serves as CoDirector of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Core of the Penn Center for AIDS Research and has been a member of the Institutional Review Board



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Andrew Baskin, M.D., serves as Aetna’s National Medical Director for Quality and Provider Performance Measurement. He is responsible for initiatives to measure and improve quality of care, establishing programs that create incentives for more effective and efficient care, organizing the collection and reporting for the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Infor- mation Set (HEDIS), participating in multistakeholder efforts to aggregate data to increase the integrity of results, and establishing performance-based networks. Prior to serving in this role, Dr. Baskin served in various medi- cal director roles at Aetna, gaining experience and expertise in clinical and coverage policy development, benefit and plan design, establishing coding and reimbursement policy, disease management program operations, and physician relations. He completed residency training and is board certified in internal medicine. Prior to joining Aetna, Dr. Baskin practiced as a pri- mary care general internist in the Philadelphia suburbs. Michael B. Blank, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Blank received his B.A. with distinc- tion in psychology from the University of Rochester and his M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Virginia. Dr. Blank’s research and writing focus on integration of health and mental health services deliv- ery systems including treatment for comorbid illness such as HIV/AIDS. Dr. Blank’s primary affiliation is with the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research in the Psychiatry Department. He also serves as Co- Director of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Core of the Penn Center for AIDS Research and has been a member of the Institutional Review Board 

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 HIV SCREENINg AND ACCESS TO CARE of the Philadelphia Health Department since 2002. He serves as associate editor of the Journal of Community Psychology, and is on the editorial boards of Psychological Assessment, Community Mental Health Journal, and Journal of Rural Community Psychology. Dr. Blank was elected to the Governing Council of the American Public Health Association in 2006. At Penn, Dr. Blank teaches behavioral and social sciences in public health in the Masters in Public Health Program; ethical issues in HIV prevention, treatment, and research in the Department of Bioethics; and a clinical seminar in community psychology and mental health services research in the Department of Psychology. He also is a member of the Executive Com- mittee of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network, which is intended to foster multisite collaboration among the NIH-funded Centers for AIDS Research in the behavioral and social sciences. He is currently a standing member of the NIH study section for Behavioral and Social Science Approaches to the Prevention of HIV/AIDS and has served as an ad hoc member on a number of other study sections. Dr. Blank is the author of more than 90 papers, book chapters and reports, and editor of a book with Marlene Eisenberg, entitled HIV: Issues with Mental Health and Ill- ness, published in 2007. Laura M. Bogart, Ph.D., is a social psychologist who specializes in applying principles of social cognition to understanding risky health behaviors. Her research focuses on the influence of medical mistrust and discrimination on health behavior among disadvantaged populations, including African Americans, Latinos, low-income individuals, and people with HIV. Dr. Bogart has designed and implemented several studies in primary and sec- ondary HIV prevention and adherence to antiretroviral treatment for HIV. Dr. Bogart’s research includes NIH-funded studies examining the associa- tion of discrimination, HIV conspiracy beliefs, and medical mistrust with treatment adherence and sexual risk among African-American and Latino men living with HIV, as well as a community-based participatory research NIH project to evaluate effects of the AIDS Project Los Angeles’ treatment advocacy program. She also conducted a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded study to examine the scope of and barriers to rapid HIV testing in hospitals, community clinics, and community-based organizations in the United States. Dr. Bogart received her Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining the Children’s Hospital of Boston in 2008, she was a Senior Behavioral Scientist at RAND and Deputy Director of the UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion, a CDC-funded Prevention Research Center. She currently serves on the American Psychological Association’s Health Psychology Disparities Committee, is Associate Editor of Annals of Behaioral Medicine, and is on the editorial board of AIDS and Behaior.

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 APPENDIX B Bernard Branson, M.D., is currently Associate Director for Laboratory Diagnostics in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention at the CDC, where he also conducts research on HIV prevention strategies. Dr. Branson has been the chief architect for the CDC’s activities surrounding new technologies for HIV testing, including rapid HIV tests and tests for HIV incidence. Most recently, Dr. Branson was the lead author for the CDC’s Revised Recom- mendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Health Care Settings. Dr. Branson has been involved in HIV counseling and testing for more than 20 years. In 1983, Dr. Branson founded the AIDS community-based organization HERO, the Health Education Resource Organization, and, in Maryland, initiated the State AIDS Hotline and Maryland’s program for anonymous HIV counseling and testing. Devon Brown, J.D., M.B.A., M.A., is Director of the D.C. Department of Corrections. Prior to his 4-year tenure as the Commissioner of the State of New Jersey’s Department of Corrections, Brown was appointed by the United States Attorney General in 1998 to serve as the Deputy Trustee in the Office of the Corrections Trustee for the District of Columbia, where his duties included serving as Interim Director of DOC for 5 months. In just 3 years under his leadership, the D.C. Department of Corrections has achieved full accreditation from the American Correctional Association and the National Commission on Correctional Health C are (NCCHC); it received the coveted 2008 Program of the Year Award from NCCHC for its innovative Discharge Planning Program; and it has been granted the pres- tigious 2010 Exemplary Program Award for its groundbreaking Automatic HIV Testing and Counseling Program. Brown’s innovative work in the New Jersey correctional system has also been nationally recognized. There he initiated a restorative justice project that encouraged offenders to give back to the communities they violated; introduced a series of inmate educational initiatives; and created a nationally acclaimed anticrime campaign. Brown earned his J.D. from the University of Maryland School of Law in 1988 and received his M.P.A. from the University of Baltimore in 1984. He also holds an M.A. in psychology from the University of Toledo and has studied extensively at the doctoral level. Jeremy Brown, M.D., is the Director of Clinical Research and an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the George Washington University Medical Center. He is a practicing emergency physician and the author of the Oxford American Handbook of Emergency Medicine, published by Oxford University Press. He is the recipient of RO1 funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is also the founding Director of the Emergency Department HIV Screening Program. This program, which began in 2006 in response to revised HIV testing recommendations from

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 HIV SCREENINg AND ACCESS TO CARE the CDC, has screened over 20,000 emergency department (ED) patients for HIV. The clinical program has generated several research papers and presentations that have been published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Academic Emer- gency Medicine, Public Health Reports, and the New York Times. The program has also been highlighted in American Medical News and the ADAP Report, which described the George Washington University program as “a model for emergency room testing.” Dr. Brown has presented his experiences with ED HIV testing to the CDC and before Congress. He has spoken at emergency medicine departments around the country that are in the process of implementing ED HIV screening. His work has also been pre- sented at several academic conferences including the American College of Emergency Physicians and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. Gary Claxton is a Vice President and the Director of the Health Care Mar- ketplace Project at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. The project provides information, research, and analysis about trends in the health care market and about policy proposals that relate to health insurance reform and the changing health care system. Prior to joining the founda- tion, Mr. Claxton worked as a senior researcher at the Institute for Health Care Research and Policy at Georgetown University, where his research focused on health insurance and health care financing. From March 1997 until January 2001, Mr. Claxton was the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health Policy at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where he advised the secretary on health policy issues including improving access to health insurance, Medicare reform, administration of Medicaid, financing of prescription drugs, expanding patient rights, and health care privacy. Other previous positions include serving as a consultant for the Lewin Group, a special deputy in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, an insurance analyst for the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, and a health policy analyst for the American Association of Retired Persons. Natalie Cramer, M.S.S.W., is the Associate Director for the Prevention Program at the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD). Founded in 1992, NASTAD is a not-for-profit membership organization representing state and territorial health department HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis programs that serve every population affected by and infected with HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis in the United States. Ms. Cramer manages NASTAD’s Communication and Technical Assistance Support for HIV/AIDS Prevention Programs cooperative agreement with the CDC. Additionally, Ms. Cramer oversees NASTAD’s portfolios for HIV testing, people who inject drugs, and HIV surveillance. Ms. Cramer has more than

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 APPENDIX B 17 years of experience working on HIV/AIDS prevention issues. She previ- ously worked for 11 years with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health HIV/AIDS Bureau’s HIV Prevention and Education Unit, where she oversaw the unit’s data collection systems and served as fiscal and program- matic contract manager for a diverse group of HIV prevention programs throughout the state targeting those at greatest risk of infection. Addition- ally, she worked closely with the state’s needle exchange programs on all program, policy, and data-related issues. In 2000, she was the recipient of Citation for Outstanding Performance on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Ms. Cramer holds a B.A. in art history from Bates Col- lege in Lewiston, Maine, and an M.S.S.W. from the University of Texas at Austin. Kevin Cranston, M.Div., is the Director of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) Bureau of Infectious Disease and served as Director of the MDPH HIV/AIDS Bureau from 2003 through 2009. Other former roles in the HIV/AIDS Bureau have included Deputy Director for Policy and Programs and Director of AIDS Prevention and Education. He also served as the AIDS/HIV Program Director at the Massachusetts Department of Education. Prior to government work, Mr. Cranston was an adolescent HIV prevention specialist at the Boston Children’s Hospital, where he helped initiate the Boston Street Youth Outreach Project. He also helped found the Boston Alliance of Gay and Lesbian Youth. Mr. Cranston holds an M.Div. degree from Harvard Divinity School where he served as a visiting lecturer for 4 years. As AIDS director, Mr. Cranston was a member of the Executive Committee and was past Chair of NASTAD and served as a technical assistant through NASTAD’s Global Program to the national and state/provincial AIDS control programs of Nigeria, Brazil, and South Africa. Carlos del Rio, M.D., is the Hubert Professor and Chair of the Hubert Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is also Co-Director of the Emory Cen- ter for AIDS Research. He has held numerous leadership roles including executive director of the National AIDS Council of Mexico, the federal agency of the Mexican government responsible for AIDS policy in that country; program director and principal investigator of the Emory AIDS International Training and Research Program; and member of the board of the International AIDS Society USA and the HIV Medicine Associa- tion of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. del Rio’s research interests include the epidemiology of opportunistic infections in HIV and other immune deficiencies, the epidemiology and transmission dynamics of

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0 HIV SCREENINg AND ACCESS TO CARE HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, HIV testing, access to care, and compliance with antiretroviral drug regimens. He is also interested in the impact of HIV in developing countries and the optimal use of antiret- roviral drugs in limited-resource settings. Dr. del Rio is associate editor of AIDS Clinical Care and AIDS Research and Human Retroiruses, and he is a member of the editorial board of Journal of AIDS, Women, Children and HIV, and global Public Health. He has coauthored more than 150 scientific papers. Timothy Flanigan, M.D., is the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Rhode Island and the Miriam Hospitals and Brown Medical School. He joined Brown Medical School in 1991 to help establish a net- work of primary care for HIV-infected individuals with a particular focus on women, substance abusers, and individuals leaving prison. Dr. Flanigan developed the HIV Core Program at the state prison to provide care for HIV-infected individuals and link them to community-based resources upon release. Dr. Flanigan is the PI on the Miriam/Brown AIDS Clinical Trials Unit to develop more effective therapies for the treatment of HIV. He is also associate director of the Miriam/Brown Fogarty Program, which trains and mentors overseas investigators in HIV/AIDS. He was the recipient of a community health leadership award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foun- dation for the development of outstanding primary care for underserved HIV-infected individuals. In 2005, he received an honorary doctorate from Salve Regina University for his support of educational opportunities for children of incarcerated parents. Donna Futterman, M.D., is a Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Director of the Adolescent AIDS Program at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York, where she has worked since 1989. Her program is one of the nation’s lead- ing programs providing comprehensive care for HIV-positive and at-risk youth. Dr. Futterman has published more than 60 articles and chapters on the care of HIV-positive and at-risk youth and an award-winning book entitled Lesbian and gay Youth: Care and Counseling. Dr. Futterman has served as a national leader, chairing the NIH-funded Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network. She has also served on the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)/CDC AIDS Advisory Council and the Committee on Pediatric AIDS of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is currently a board member of Life Beat—The Music Industry Fights AIDS and the South African program Mothers to Mothers. In the United States she led the development of an innovative, multicity social marketing pro- gram “Gettin’ Busy?” promoting HIV testing to youth and has developed ACTS (Advise, Consent, Test, Support), a program to promote routine HIV

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 APPENDIX B testing in health care settings. Dr. Futterman also helped lead the initiation of the Bronx-wide testing campaign with the NY Department of Health, for which she serves as community Co-Chair. She is also working to scale up testing and linkage to care for youth in South Africa. Articles quoting Dr. Futterman have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Newsweek, and Seenteen Magazine. She has also appeared on news broadcasts including good Morning America, CNN, PBS, MTV, and NPR. Dr. Futterman earned her B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University (1975) and her M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1985). She completed her pediatric residency at Montefiore Medical Center and trained as a fellow in immunology/infectious diseases at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in Newark, New Jersey. RADM Scott Giberson, R.Ph., Ph.C., M.P.H., is the Acting Director of the Division of Clinical and Community Services, Indian Health Service (IHS). He has a dual role as the National IHS HIV/AIDS Program Principal Con- sultant and has served approximately 16 years in the Public Health Service. He has worked in the field in multiple IHS areas and in many countries abroad. He has worked in many clinical and administrative roles including as Senior Public Health Advisor, Medical Unit Lead (for an international public health program with the Department of Defense), and as a part-time credentialed midlevel provider of a family practice medical staff in the IHS. Previously, he assisted U.S. Pacific Command with operational oversight on an HIV/AIDS program spanning more than 23 countries in Asia and the Pacific. He currently serves as an invited subject matter expert at the U.S. Marine Corps Command Staff College on international health dur- ing their Capstone course. He has authored articles on HIV and spoken on public health and HIV topics at numerous venues across the United States, Asia, and the Pacific. He was invited as a keynote speaker to the Singapore Armed Forces Multinational Public Health Conference in 2006. He has worked with indigenous and underserved populations his entire career within and external to the IHS. He developed a comprehensive IHS National HIV Strategic Plan and completed HIV program expansions IHS-wide with a focus on HIV testing initiatives. Nina T. Harawa, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Charles Drew University with an Assistant Adjunct Professor appointment at UCLA in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Harawa has several years of public health experience in the areas of HIV/AIDS and incarceration health including extensive experience in HIV research, serving as epidemiologist at the HIV Epidemiology Program in Los Angeles. While in the HIV Epidemi- ology Program, Dr. Harawa was the PI for two CDC-funded HIV Testing Surveys and was the lead epidemiologist and Co-Investigator on various

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 HIV SCREENINg AND ACCESS TO CARE other CDC-funded studies examining the prevalence of HIV infection, test- ing, and risky behaviors in high-risk populations such as men who have sex with men, low-income hotel residents, sexually transmitted disease clinic attendees, and new arrestees. Dr. Harawa is currently PI for a collaborative university-wide AIDS Research Program award to develop and pilot a new HIV prevention intervention for African American men who have sex with men and women (MAALES Project). She also has pilot awards to examine correlates of allostatic load in a subset of intervention participants and to examine predictors of HIV prevention utilization among male-to-female transgender and female sex workers in the HIV Testing Survey. Michael Alan Horberg, M.D., M.A.S., FACP, is Director of HIV/AIDS programwide for Kaiser Permanente (KP) and the Permanente Federation and is Clinical Lead for HIV/AIDS for the Care Management Institute. He cochairs the NCQA/AMA/HRSA/IDSA Expert Panel on HIV-related pro- vider performance measures. Dr. Horberg also chairs the Central Research Committee for KP Northern California. In that capacity, he also serves on the KPNC Health Services Institutional Review Board. He is a Clinical Instructor at Stanford University Medical School and is a research scientist at the Permanente Medical Group Division of Research. Dr. Horberg is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, and he presently serves on the board of directors of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Disease Society of America. Dr. Horberg is past-president of the national Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. His HIV research interests are health service outcomes for HIV-infected patients (including HIV quality measures and care improvement, and determinants of optimized multidisciplinary care for maximized HIV outcomes), medication adherence issues in these patients, and HIV epidemiology. He graduated from Boston University’s College of Liberal Arts and School of Medicine (with honors of summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa) and completed his internal medicine residency at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago (University of Chicago affiliate). He received his Master of Advanced Studies (Clinical Research) from Univer- sity of California, San Francisco. Peter Leone, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and adjunct Professor of Epi- demiology at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He also serves as medical director for the STD and HIV Prevention and Control Branch for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and as the director of the UNC STI Clinical Trials Unit. He is also the medi- cal director for the North Carolina Screening and Tracing Active Transmis- sion Program, a unique program to identify and trace acute HIV infections in North Carolina. Dr. Leone served as the medical director for Wake County Human Services STD and HIV clinics for 12 years prior to taking

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 APPENDIX B his state position. Active in many professional organizations, Dr. Leone is a member of the National Coalition of STD Directors and serves as their cur- rent board chair, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and is on the national advisory board for the CDC Medical Monitoring Project. He also serves on the editorial board for the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases. In 2008, he received the Marty Prairie Award. This award, pre- sented by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, is given to individuals or orga- nizations whose work with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases “exhibits distinguished, bold, and innovative community service and/or advocacy that positively impacts North Carolina.” Dr Leone received his M.D. from Northeastern Ohio University College of Medicine, Rootstown, and completed his medical residency at the Akron City Hospital and Infec- tious Diseases fellowship at Wake Forest University. Manya Magnus, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Co-Director of George Washington University’s MPH Epidemiology Program, Codirector of the Graduate Cer- tificate in HIV/AIDS Studies, and Deputy Director of the Center for HIV/ AIDS Epidemiologic Biostatistics and Public Health Laboratory Research. With a focus on behavioral epidemiology, high-risk populations, and health information technology, Dr. Magnus has managed, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, and large cross-sectional studies. She applies epidemiologic methodology in the analysis and implementation of CDC-sponsored surveillance, the National Institute of Allergy and Infec- tious Diseases, Division of AIDS (DAIDS)-funded HIV network studies, and Special Projects of National Significance funded by the HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) of HRSA. Dr. Magnus also participates in a variety of other HIV- related research activities. Cindy Mann, J.D., is Director, Center for Medicaid and State Operations, at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Previously Ms. Mann was a research professor at Georgetown University Health Policy Institute and the executive director of the Center for Children and Families at the Institute where her work focused on health coverage, financing, and access issues affecting low-income populations. From 1999 to 2001, Ms. Mann was the director of the Family and Children’s Health Program Group at the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), now CMS. In that capacity, she directed, at the federal level, the implementation and oversight of the Medicaid program with respect to families, children, and pregnant women, and oversaw the implementation of Children’s Health Insurance Program. Prior to her work at HCFA, Ms. Mann led the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities’ federal and state health policy work. She also has extensive state-level experience, having worked on health care, welfare, and

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 HIV SCREENINg AND ACCESS TO CARE public finance issues in Massachusetts, New York, and Rhode Island. She holds a law degree from New York University School of Law. Benjamin Tsoi, M.D., M.P.H., joined the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH) in 2006 and currently serves as the Director of HIV Testing in the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control. Prior to this position, he worked for the CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer in NYC DOHMH’s Bureau of Communicable Disease. Dr. Tsoi received his M.D. from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University. He completed spe- cialty training in family medicine at the University of Minnesota. Following residency, he worked for 5 years in the Indian Health Service in the Navajo Nation at Shiprock, New Mexico. Darrell P. Wheeler, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.S.W., is the Associate Dean for Research and Community Partnerships and an Associate Professor at the Hunter College School of Social Work. He is also a member of the School of Public Health doctoral faculty at the City University of New York and a member of the Hunter College Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function. In addition to being a Protocol cochairperson to the HPTN 061 Study (part of the HIV Prevention Trials Network), he was the Co-PI of Brothers y Hermanos, a CDC epidemiologic HIV/AIDS research study of black men who have sex with men (MSM) in New York City. He has served on the NYC Prevention Planning Group and on review panels for the CDC, NIH, National Institute of Mental Health, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of gay and Lesbian Social Serices, International Journal of Men’s Health, and Journal of HIV/AIDS in Social Serices. Dr. Wheeler was recently elected the national Vice-President of the National Associa- tion of Social Workers (2009–2012), is a New York Academy of Medicine Fellow, and is a member of the American Public Health Association. His overall research agenda and publications focus on the identification and exploration of individual and communal resiliency in HIV prevention and intervention, with particular emphasis on African American and black gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. Dr. Wheeler received his B.A. in Sociology from Cornell College, his M.S.W. from Howard University, and his M.P.H. and Ph.D. in social work from the University of Pittsburgh.