Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

JOSEPH P. NEWHOUSE (Chair) is the John D. MacArthur professor of health policy and management and chair of the Committee on Higher Degrees in Health Policy in the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University. He is a member of the faculties of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, the Harvard Medical School, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, as well as a faculty research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He spent the first 20 years of his career at RAND, where he designed and directed the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, a project that from 1971 to 1988 studied the consequences of different ways of financing medical services. From 1981 to 1985 he was head of the RAND economics department. His expertise is in the areas of health care financing, health research policy, health services research, health care quality and outcomes, and general economics/health economics. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University.


DAVID M. CUTLER is the Otto Eckstein professor of applied economics in the Department of Economics and the Kennedy School of Government and was formerly an associate dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for social sciences at Harvard University. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research concentrates on the value of medical innovation. He has examined how population health is changing over time, the importance of medical and nonmedical factors in improved health, and the value of increased medical spending. He has written extensively arguing that medical care is more productive than current statistics indicate and that the medical care cost problem



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff jOSEPH P. NEWHOUSE (Chair) is the John D. MacArthur professor of health policy and management and chair of the Committee on Higher Degrees in Health Policy in the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University. He is a member of the faculties of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, the Harvard Medical School, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, as well as a faculty research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He spent the first 20 years of his career at RAND, where he designed and directed the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, a project that from 1971 to 1988 studied the consequences of different ways of financing medical services. From 1981 to 1985 he was head of the RAND economics department. His expertise is in the areas of health care financing, health research policy, health services research, health care quality and outcomes, and general economics/ health economics. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. DAVID M. CUTLER is the Otto Eckstein professor of applied economics in the Department of Economics and the Kennedy School of Government and was for- merly an associate dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for social sciences at Harvard University. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Eco - nomic Research. His research concentrates on the value of medical innovation. He has examined how population health is changing over time, the importance of medical and nonmedical factors in improved health, and the value of increased medical spending. He has written extensively arguing that medical care is more productive than current statistics indicate and that the medical care cost problem 

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 ACCOUNTING fOr HeALTH AND HeALTH CAre is overstated. He is also interested in the economics of health insurance and the impact of managed care on the medical system. Cutler served on the Council of Economic Advisers and the National Economic Council during the Clinton administration and advised the presidential campaigns of Bill Bradley and John Kerry. Among other affiliations, he has held positions with the National Institutes of Health and has served on many study groups of the National Research Council/ National Academy of Sciences. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. DENNIS G. FRYBACK is professor emeritus of population health sciences and industrial engineering at the University of Wisconsin. He is a founding member of the Society for Medical Decision Making, has been continuously active in its work since 1978, served as president in 1982-1983, and received its EL Saenger Service Award in 1994 and Award for Career Achievement in 1999. His research and teaching interests include medical technology assessment, health care cost- effectiveness analysis, measurement of population-level health status and health- related quality of life assessment, use of simulation modeling to understand cancer epidemiology, and use of Bayesian statistical analysis in these areas and in pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. He was initiator and program director for an institutional doctoral training grant in population-based health services research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In 1986 he succeeded the first editor-in-chief of Medical Decision Making for a 3-year term. He cur- rently serves on the editorial board of Health Services and Outcomes research Methodology. He is fellow of the Association of Health Services Research. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan. ALAN M. GARBER is the Henry J. Kaiser, Jr., professor and professor of medicine at Stanford University and staff physician at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto Health Care System. At Stanford, he is also professor of economics and of health care delivery and financing. He is the founding direc - tor of the Center for Health Policy and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on methods for improving health care delivery and financing—particularly for the elderly—in settings of limited resources. He has developed methods for determining the cost effectiveness of health interven- tions, and he studies ways to structure financial and organizational incentives to ensure that cost-effective care is delivered. In addition, his research explores how clinical practice patterns and health care market characteristics influence technology adoption, health expenditures, and health outcomes in the United States and other countries. He leads the Global Healthcare Productivity project, which includes collaborators from 19 nations. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has A.B., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees, all in economics, from Harvard

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 APPeNDIX B University and an M.D. from the Stanford School of Medicine. He completed a residency in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. EMMETT B. KEELER is a professor in the Department of Health Policy at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and senior mathematician at RAND. He leads a large study to evaluate a new model for helping people with chronic diseases manage their health better. He also directs a project at the University of California, Los Angeles, that supplies cost-effectiveness analyses to a variety of geriatric interventions and a project to develop a business case for providers to offer higher quality care. In the RAND Health Insurance Experiment, he investigated the theoretical and empirical effects of alternative health insurance plans on episodes of treatment and health outcomes. He has led several projects dealing with the potential demand for and effects of medical savings accounts. He has received article-of-the-year awards from the Association for Health Ser- vices Research for papers on outlier payments (1988), on the costs to others of bad health habits (1989), and on whether impoverished Medicare patients receive worse care in hospitals than do other patients (1994). He is the author or coauthor of numerous articles and four books. He has a Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University. CHRISTOPHER D. MACKIE (Study Director) is a staff officer with the Com- mittee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) specializing in economic measurement and statistics. He has served as study director for a number of projects, includ- ing those that produced the following reports: At What Price?: Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes (2002), Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States (2005), and Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s future (2007). He has also led a number of CNSTAT initiatives related to data access, sharing, and confidentiality issues. Previously he was a senior economist with SAG Corpora - tion, where he conducted a variety of econometric studies in the areas of labor and personnel economics, primarily for federal agencies. He is the author of Canonizing economic Theory. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina and has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and Tulane University. ALLISON B. ROSEN is assistant professor in the Division of General Medicine and the Department of Health Management at the University of Michigan. She is also clinical director of the Center for Value-Based Insurance Design in the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Her clinical work is primar- ily in the areas of diabetes, geriatrics, and cardiovascular disease. Her research interests focus on the impact of drug benefit design on the quality and value of health care. She has an M.D. from Duke University, an M.P.H. from the Univer- sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and an Sc.D. from Harvard University. She

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 ACCOUNTING fOr HeALTH AND HeALTH CAre completed a residency at the University of California, San Francisco, and is certi- fied by the American Board of Internal Medicine. She has received fellowships in general medicine and health policy from Harvard Medical School, the Health Services Research unit of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Harvard School of Public Health. jACK E. TRIPLETT is a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. His current research concerns productivity in health, finance, and other services industries, with a focus on developing improved measures of output for these notably difficult to measure sectors of the economy. From 1985 to 1997, he was chief economist at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (on leave in 1996-1997 to the National Bureau of Economic Research). From 1971 to 1985, he held positions at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, includ - ing associate commissioner for research and evaluation and chief of the Price Research Division. In 1979, he was assistant director for price monitoring at the Council on Wage and Price Stability. He has written extensively on problems of economic measurement, including price indexes, national accounts, capital stock and labor input, and productivity and technical change. He is the editor of fifty Years of economic Measurement (with Ernst R. Berndt), The Measurement of Labor Cost, and Measuring the Prices of Medical Treatments. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the 1997 winner of the Julius Shiskin Award for Economic Statistics, awarded jointly by the National Association of Business Economists and the Washington Statistical Society. He has A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley.