Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Vernon P. Roan, Chair, is retired director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been a faculty member for more than 30 years. Since 1994, he has also been the director of the University of Florida Fuel cell Research and Training Laboratory. Previously he was a senior design engineer with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. Dr. Roan has more than 25 years of research and development experience as well as modeling and simulation experience for a fuel cell bus program. He worked as a consultant to Pratt and Whitney on advanced gas-turbine propulsion systems until his 2007 retirement from that position. His research at the University of Florida has involved both spark-ignition and diesel engines operating with many alternative fuels and advanced concepts. With groups of engineering students, he designed and built a 20-passenger diesel-electric bus for the Florida Department of Transportation and a hybrid–electric urban car using an internal-combustion engine and lead-acid batteries. He has been a consultant to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, monitoring their electric and hybrid vehicle programs. He has organized and chaired two national meetings on advanced vehicle technologies and a national seminar on the development of fuel-cell-powered automobiles and has published numerous technical papers on innovative propulsion systems. He was one of four members of the Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Panel of the California Air Resources Board (CARB), which issued a report in May 1998 regarding the status and outlook for fuel cells for transportation applications. He also served as one of five members of CARB’s Zero Emission Vehicle Expert Panel, which issued a report on the Status and Prospects for Zero Emission Vehicle Technology in April 2007. He has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program,



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Vernon P. roan, Chair, is retired director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been a faculty member for more than 30 years. Since 1994, he has also been the director of the University of Florida Fuel cell Research and Training Laboratory. Previously he was a senior design engineer with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. Dr. Roan has more than 25 years of research and development experience as well as modeling and simulation experience for a fuel cell bus program. He worked as a consultant to Pratt and Whitney on advanced gas-turbine propulsion systems until his 2007 retirement from that position. His research at the University of Florida has involved both spark-ignition and diesel engines operating with many alternative fuels and advanced concepts. With groups of engineering students, he designed and built a 20-passenger diesel-electric bus for the Florida Department of Transportation and a hybrid–electric urban car using an internal-combustion engine and lead-acid batteries. He has been a consultant to the Jet Propulsion Labora- tory, monitoring their electric and hybrid vehicle programs. He has organized and chaired two national meetings on advanced vehicle technologies and a national seminar on the development of fuel-cell-powered automobiles and has published numerous technical papers on innovative propulsion systems. He was one of four members of the Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Panel of the California Air Resources Board (CARB), which issued a report in May 1998 regarding the status and out- look for fuel cells for transportation applications. He also served as one of five members of CARB’s Zero Emission Vehicle Expert Panel, which issued a report on the Status and Prospects for Zero Emission vehicle Technology in April 2007. He has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) committees, includ- ing the Committee on Review of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Research Program, 

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 APPENDiX A Phase 1 and Phase 2, and the prior Committee to Review the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Dr. Roan received his B.S. in aeronautical engineering and his M.S. in engineering from the University of Florida and a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Illinois. deborah lynn Bleviss is an independent consultant focused on studies and analyses on sustainable energy and transportation both internationally and domes- tically. Recent studies that she has worked on have included options for biofuels development, and an evaluation of the barriers and potential solutions to clean- energy financing, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Her previous positions include partner, the BBG Group; program manager, Sustainable Markets for Sus - tainable Energy, Inter-American Development Bank; consultant to the Department of Energy’s Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; executive director and president of the board of directors, International Institute for Energy Conservation; and associate director for Energy and Environment, Federation of American Scientists. She has extensive experience in the impact of transportation on the environment, and with strategies, both technical and policy, related to the development and deployment of transportation systems more conducive to sustainability. She has served on numerous advisory councils and committees and was the lead author, Second Assessment Report of the Intergov - ernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1994-1995. She has written extensively on transportation, vehicles, energy, and the environment. She has a B.S. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles. david l. Bodde serves as a professor and senior fellow at Clemson University. Prior to joining Clemson University, Dr. Bodde held the Charles N. Kimball Chair in Technology and Innovation at the University of Missouri in Kansas City. Dr. Bodde serves on the board of directors of several energy and technology companies, including Great Plains Energy and the Commerce Funds. His execu- tive experience includes vice president, Midwest Research Institute; president, MRI Ventures; assistant director of the Congressional Budget Office; and deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Energy. He has served as a member of the NRC’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, the Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use, and the Committee on Assessment of Resource Needs for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Tech - nologies. He was once a soldier and served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam. He has a doctorate in business administration from Harvard University, M.S. degrees in nuclear engineering (1972) and management (1973), and a B.S. from the United States Military Academy. Kathryn Bullock is the president and founder of Coolohm, Inc., which is a techni- cal consulting company that specializes in direct current (dc) power sources such as batteries, capacitors, and fuel cells and their application in electronic systems.

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 APPENDiX A She is also an adjunct faculty member at Villanova University, where she teaches a course on Electrochemical Power Sources, including fuel cells, batteries, and capacitors and their application in dc power systems. Her previous positions include vice president, C&D Technologies, Inc., where she was responsible for the development of new battery products and new product applications such as solar energy and fuel cell systems and for providing technical leadership and support to executive and board members; development manager, power sources, Medtronic, Inc. Promeon Division; technical manager, Batteries and Purchased Products, Lucent Technologies, Bell Laboratories (Mesquite, Texas); and manager, Chemi - cal Research Department, and senior electrochemist, Electrochemical Research Department, Johnson Controls, Inc. She has extensive research and development and manufacturing experience in electrochemical devices, including batteries and capacitors. She has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry and an M.S. in chemistry from Northwestern University and a B.A. in English from Colorado University. harry e. cook (Nae) is professor emeritus, Department of General Engineering, University of Illinois. He is a recipient of the Robert Lansing Hardy Medal and the Teetor Award. He has also received awards from the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers, and a fellow of the American Society of Metals. His career in the automotive industry began at the Ford Motor Company as a senior research engineer and culminated with his position as the director of automotive research with Chrysler Motors. Dr. Cook was also a professor with the University of Illinois in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and director of the Manufacturing Research Center. His research experience includes phase transformations, friction and wear, automotive product development, value engineering, and competitiveness. He received his Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University, and an M.S. and B.S. in metallurgical engineering from Case Western Reserve University. Glenn a. eisman is a principal partner, Eisman Technology Consultants, LLC, a managing partner at H2Pump LLC, and an adjunct professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in materials science and engineering (Troy, N.Y.), and at the Graduate College of Engineering at Union University (Schenectady, N.Y.). His previous positions include chief technology officer, Plug Power, Inc.; technical leader, Advanced Materials Program, Central Research and New Businesses, The Dow Chemical Company; project leader, Discovery Research R&D and product development of fuel cells, hydrogen technologies, electrochemical engineering, physical and inorganic solid-state chemistry, and new technology commercializa - tion and business development. He received the Inventor of the Year Award, from the Dow Chemical Co. (1993) and is a member of the Electrochemical Society. He received a B.S. in chemistry from Temple University and a Ph.D. in physical inorganic chemistry from Northeastern University. He has published more than 20 technical papers and has been awarded more than 20 U.S. patents.

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0 APPENDiX A W. robert epperly is an independent consultant. From 1994 to 1997, he was president of Catalytica Advanced Technologies, Inc., a company developing new catalytic technologies for the petroleum and chemical industries. Prior to joining Catalytica, he was general manager of Exxon Corporate Research and earlier was director of the Exxon Fuels Research Laboratory. After leaving Exxon, he was chief executive officer of Fuel Tech N.V., a company developing new combustion and air pollution control technology. Mr. Epperly has authored or coauthored more than 50 publications on technical and managerial topics, including two books, and has 38 U.S. patents. He has extensive experience in the conversion of fossil feedstocks to alternative fuels such as gases and liquids, fuels, catalysis, air pollution control, and R&D management. He received an M.S. degree in chemical engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. William d. ernst is an independent consultant. He retired from Plug Power, Inc., as vice president and chief scientist. There he was responsible for proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology assessment and advanced development, as well as technical initiatives within the government sector. Most recently, he investigated the applicability of solid oxide fuel cell technology to various con - tinuous power applications. Prior to joining Plug Power, Dr. Ernst was business area manager of the Technology Division at Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI), where he was responsible for the management and development of the fuel cell, hybrid electric vehicle, and flywheel business. His other positions at MTI included business development manager, manager for the Kinematic and Advanced Power System Programs, and program manager for the Automotive Stirling Engine program. Previously, Dr. Ernst founded a consulting/engineering business and held positions with Huyck Corporation and Ling Tempco Vought. He is the author of more than 100 technical reports and papers on subjects including proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology development and application and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. Dr. Ernst is the recipient of the 1998 Partnership for the Next Generation of Vehicles Award. He received a B.S. in engineering from Tufts University, an M.S. in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in aeronautical engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. david e. Foster is a professor of mechanical engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and former director of the Engine Research Center, which has won two center of excellence competitions for engine research and has extensive facilities for research on internal combustion engines. A member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin since he completed his Ph.D., Dr. Foster teaches and conducts research in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, internal combustion engines, and emission-formation processes. His work has focused specifically on perfecting the application of optical diagnostics in engine systems and the incorporation of simplified or phenomenological models of emission-formation

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 APPENDiX A processes into engineering simulations. He has published more than 60 technical articles in this field throughout the world and for leading societies in this country. He is a recipient of the Ralph R. Teetor Award, the Forest R. McFarland Award, and the Lloyd L. Withrow Distinguished Speaker Award of the Society of Auto - motive Engineers (SAE) and is an SAE Fellow. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee to Review the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of Wisconsin and has won departmental, engineering society, and university awards for his classroom teaching. He received a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in mechani- cal engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Gerald Gabrielse (Nas) is Leverett Professor of Physics at Harvard University. His previous positions include assistant and associate professor, University of Washington-Seattle, and chair of the Harvard Physics Department. His physics research focuses on making the most accurate measurements of the electron mag - netic moment and the fine structure constant, and on the precise laser spectroscopy of helium. Professor Gabrielse also leads the International Antihydrogen TRAP (ATRAP) Collaboration, whose goal is accurate laser spectroscopy with trapped anti-hydrogen atoms. His many awards and prizes include fellow of the American Physical Society, Davisson-Germer prize of the American Physical Society, the Humboldt Research Award (Germany, 2005) and the Tomassoni Award (Italy, 2008). Harvard University awarded him both its George Ledlie Research Prize and its Levenson Teaching Prize. His hundreds of outside lectures include a Källén Lecture (Sweden), a Poincaré Lecture (France), a Faraday Lecture (Cambridge, U.K.), a Schrodinger Lecture (Austria), a Zachariasen Lecture (University of Chicago), and a Rosenthal Lecture (Yale). He is a member of the National Acad - emy of Sciences. He has a B.S. from Calvin College, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. linos Jacovides recently retired as director, Delphi Research Laboratories, a position that he held from 1998 to 2007. Dr. Jacovides joined General Motors (GM) Research and Development in 1967 and became department head of elec - trical engineering in 1985. His areas of research were the interactions between power electronics and electrical machines in electric vehicles and locomotives. He later transitioned to Delphi with a group of researchers from GM to set up the Delphi Research Laboratories. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and was president of the Industry Applications Society of IEEE in 1990. He received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering and an M.S. in machine theory from the University of Glasgow, Scotland, in 1961 and 1962, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in generator control systems from the Imperial College, University of London, in 1965.

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 APPENDiX A harold h. Kung is a professor of chemical engineering and director of the Center for Energy Efficient Transportation at Northwestern University. His areas of research include surface chemistry, catalysis, and chemical reaction engineer- ing. His professional experience includes work as a research chemist at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. He is a recipient of the P.H. Emmett Award and the Robert Burwell Lectureship Award from the North American Catalysis Society, the Herman Pines Award of the Chicago Catalysis Club, the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowship, the John McClanahan Henske Distinguished Lectureship of Yale University, and the Olaf A. Hougen Professor- ship at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University. christopher l. magee (Nae) is a professor, Engineering Systems Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and director, Center for Innovation in Product Development. Prior to joining MIT, he held a number of positions at Ford Motor Company, including director, Vehicle Systems Engineering; director, Advanced Vehicle Engineering; manager, Materials Science Department; senior research scientist, Metallurgy Department; and executive director, Programs and Advanced Engineering, with global responsibility for all major technically deep areas involved in Ford’s Product Development Organization. He has expertise in such areas as phase transformations, plastic deformation, materials strength, large-scale collapse of engineering structures, product development, automotive design, value engineering, and simultaneous manufacturing/product engineering. He has made important contributions to the understanding of the transformation, structure, and strength of ferrous materials and to lightweight materials develop - ment and implementation; he pioneered experimental work on high-rate structural collapse aimed at vehicle crashworthiness; and he adapted systems engineering to the modern automotive design process. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to advanced vehicle development, was a Ford Technical Fellow (1996), and is a fellow of the American Society for Materials. He has a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and an M.B.A. from Michigan State University. Gene Nemanich is the retired vice president of Hydrogen Systems for Chevron Technology Ventures where he was responsible for hydrogen supply and for developing and commercializing new hydrogen technologies. He has 32 years of experience with integrated oil companies, including Exxon, Cities Service, Texaco, and Chevron. He has also worked in the areas of refining, clean coal technology, oil supply and trading, and research leading to the development of new hydrogen systems. Mr. Nemanich represented Texaco in the California Fuel Cell Partnership in 2000-2001 and was a director of Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC, a joint venture with Energy Conversion Devices to commercialize

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 APPENDiX A metal hydride hydrogen storage systems. He was one of seven industry leaders who helped prepare the DOE-sponsored Hydrogen Roadmap, and he has served as chair of the National Hydrogen Association. He recently served on the NRC Committee on Assessment of Resource Needs for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Tech - nologies. He has a B.S. in chemical engineering from University of Illinois and an M.B.A. from the University of Houston. Bernard robertson (Nae) is the president of BIR1, LLC, an engineering consul- tancy specializing in transportation and energy matters that he founded in January 2004, upon his retirement from DaimlerChrysler Corporation. During the latter part of his 38-year career in the automotive industry, Mr. Robertson was elected an officer of Chrysler Corporation in February 1992. He was appointed senior vice president coincident with the merger of Chrysler Corporation and Daimler- Benz AG in November 1998, and was named senior vice president of engineering technologies and regulatory affairs in January 2001. In his last position, he led the Liberty and Technical Affairs Research Group, Advanced Technology Manage- ment and FreedomCAR activities, and hybrid electric, battery electric, fuel cell, and military vehicle development. In addition, he was responsible for regulatory analysis and compliance for safety and emissions. Mr. Robertson holds an M.B.A. degree from Michigan State University, a master’s degree in automotive engineer- ing from the Chrysler Institute, and a master’s degree in mechanical sciences from Cambridge University, England. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers (U.K.), a chartered engineer (U.K.), and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. r. rhoads stephenson is currently a technology consultant. Previously, he held a number of positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and Martin Marietta Corporation. At JPL, these included deputy director and acting director, Technology and Applica - tions Programs; manager, Electronics and Control Division; deputy manager, Con- trol and Energy Conversion Division; and manager of Systems Analysis Section. He also served as associate administrator for research and development, NHTSA and while at Martin Marietta Corporation worked on energy conversion devices for space power. He has been a consultant to the Motor Vehicle Fire Research Institute, has been providing peer reviews of automotive safety issues, and has recently published a number of papers on crash-induced fire safety issues with motor vehicles, including hydrogen-fueled vehicles. He brings extensive exper- tise in vehicle safety analysis, advanced technology systems, energy conversion technologies, and energy and environmental analysis. He has a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Kathleen c. Taylor (Nae) is retired director of the Materials and Processes Laboratory at General Motors Research and Development and Planning Center

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 APPENDiX A in Warren, Michigan. Dr. Taylor was simultaneously chief scientist for General Motors of Canada, Ltd. in Oshawa, Ontario. Earlier Dr. Taylor was department head for physics and physical chemistry and department head for environmental sciences. Currently, Dr. Taylor serves on the DOE Hydrogen Technology Advi - sory Committee, the Transportation Research Board Committee for a Study of Potential Energy Savings and Greenhouse Gas Reduction from Transportation, the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, the DOE Materials Forum, and the Advisory Committee for Columbia University Center for Electron Trans - port in Molecular Nanostructures. Dr. Taylor was awarded the Garvan Medal from the American Chemical Society. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Indian National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of SAE International and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was the president of the Materials Research Society and chair of the board of directors of the Gordon Research Conferences. She has expertise in R&D management, fuel cells, bat - teries, catalysis, exhaust emission control and automotive materials. She received an A.B. in chemistry from Douglass College and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Northwestern University. Brijesh Vyas is a distinguished member of the technical staff at LGS Innova- tions, LLC. Previously he was a member of the Nanotechnology and Integrated Photonic Research Departments at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, N.J., responsible for advanced materials and processes for microelectromechanical systems and photonic devices. He was also the technical manager of the Energy Conversion Technology Group responsible for research on advanced materials and technolo - gies for energy storage systems. He has led efforts to develop various rechargeable batteries and related energy conversion technologies for a variety of telecommuni- cations applications. He was formerly at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been a guest professor at the Technical University of Denmark in Copenhagen investigating the corrosion and erosion of metals. He received the Sam Tour Award from the American Society of Materials and Testing. His areas of expertise include materials science, electrochemistry, and corrosion. He served on the NRC Com - mittee to Review the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium’s electric vehicle battery R&D project selection process. He received a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay and a Ph.D. in materials science from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. eric Williams is research director, Center for Earth Systems Engineering and Management and assistant professor, Department of Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering, School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. His research interests include industrial ecology, life-cycle assessment, information technology, and energy systems. His best-known work addresses the environmental assessment and management of information technology hardware. Dr. Williams

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 APPENDiX A also investigates energy topics such as long-term, second-law efficiency trends and the effects of development and urbanization on energy demand in industrial - izing nations. He has worked in the areas of hybrid life-cycle assessment (which combines process and economic input-output techniques), uncertainty analysis in industrial ecology, and the sector-level forecasting of technological change and growth. His areas of expertise include industrial ecology, life-cycle assessment, and the macro-assessment of energy supply and demand. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the State University of New York.

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