E
Speaker Biographies

David Abramson, Ph.D., M.P.H. is director of research at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness. He is the principal investigator of the longitudinal Gulf Coast Child & Family Health Study, an examination of need recovery among more than 1,000 randomly sampled displaced and impacted families in Louisiana and Mississippi. Dr. Abramson is also an associate editor of the American Medical Association (AMA) peer-reviewed journal, Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. His areas of study include disaster recovery and resiliency, the social ecology of vulnerability, risk communication targeted to high-risk or elusive communities, and survey research on preparedness attitudes and behaviors. Other current disaster-related research activities include a study of “Elusive Communities” and how hidden populations such as undocumented immigrants hear and respond to public health emergency messages; the American Hotspots project, which focuses on the measurement and mapping of social vulnerability and hazard; and an evaluation of risk messaging and community engagement, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to identify appropriate mechanisms for two-way communication. Dr. Abramson holds a Ph.D. in socio-medical sciences with a specialization in political science and a master’s of public health, both from Columbia University.


Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D. (planning committee chair) is a professor of medical psychology in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry, and director of the Center for Health and Community at the University of California, San Francisco. A social psychologist by training, Dr. Adler’s research interests include the impact of risk perception on reproductive and sexual health decision



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E Speaker Biographies David Abramson, Ph.D., M.P.H. is director of research at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness. He is the princi- pal investigator of the longitudinal Gulf Coast Child & Family Health Study, an examination of need recovery among more than 1,000 ran- domly sampled displaced and impacted families in Louisiana and Missis- sippi. Dr. Abramson is also an associate editor of the American Medical Association (AMA) peer-reviewed journal, Disaster Medicine and Pub- lic Health Preparedness. His areas of study include disaster recovery and resiliency, the social ecology of vulnerability, risk communication tar- geted to high-risk or elusive communities, and survey research on pre- paredness attitudes and behaviors. Other current disaster-related research activities include a study of “Elusive Communities” and how hidden populations such as undocumented immigrants hear and respond to pub- lic health emergency messages; the American Hotspots project, which focuses on the measurement and mapping of social vulnerability and hazard; and an evaluation of risk messaging and community engagement, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to identify appropriate mechanisms for two-way communication. Dr. Abramson holds a Ph.D. in socio-medical sciences with a specialization in political science and a master’s of public health, both from Columbia University. Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D. (planning committee chair) is a professor of medical psychology in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry, and director of the Center for Health and Community at the University of California, San Francisco. A social psychologist by training, Dr. Adler’s research interests include the impact of risk perception on reproductive and sexual health decision 165

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166 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL making and identification of mechanisms by which socioeconomic status (SES) influences health. In the area of risk perception, she has studied how adolescents’ perceptions of the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy influence sexual behavior and use of contraceptives. Dr. Adler’s research on SES and health has focused on how social, psycho- logical, and biological factors associated with SES act together to deter- mine the onset and progression of disease, and how the relationship of SES and health may differ depending on gender and ethnicity. She is the author of more than 150 articles, books, and book chapters and is cur- rently a member of the editorial boards for the journals Annals of Behav- ioral Medicine, Journal of Health Psychology, and Journal of Applied Social Psychology. Dr. Adler was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1994. She served as a member of the IOM Committee on Pre- vention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and chaired the Committee on Psychosocial Services to Cancer Patients/Families in a Community Setting. Dr. Adler received her Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard University. John C. Bailar III, M.D., Ph.D. (planning committee member) is a pro- fessor emeritus at the University of Chicago and founding chair of the Department of Health Studies there. A retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Bailar worked at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda for 22 years, and since then he has held academic appointments at Harvard and McGill Universities. Dr. Bailar’s research interests focus on the interpretation of statistical evidence in medicine, with special emphasis on cancer. For 6 years Dr. Bailar was editor-in- chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. For 11 years he was the statistical consultant for the New England Journal of Medicine, and more recently he has been a member of the editorial board of that jour- nal. Dr. Bailar is a member of the Institute of Medicine and earned his M.D. from Yale in 1955 and his Ph.D. in statistics from American Uni- versity in 1973. Scott Barnhart, M.D., M.P.H. is a professor of medicine and global health and division director of Health Systems Strengthening at I-TECH at the University of Washington. Dr. Barnhart’s background and training have included extensive clinical work, as well as developing training and research programs in medicine, occupational health, and health systems in resource-limited environments. Prior to his current position, Dr. Barnhart was the associate dean for clinical affairs, the medical di-

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167 APPENDIX E rector of the Harborview Medical Center, and a senior clinical advisor at the I-TECH Department of Global Health. Dr. Barnhart received his medical degree from George Washington University in 1979 and his master’s of public health in 1986 from the University of Washington. The Honorable Regina M. Benjamin, M.D., M.B.A. is the 18th Sur- geon General of the U.S. Public Health Service. As America’s Doctor, she provides members of the public with the best scientific information available on how to improve their health and the health of the nation. Dr. Benjamin also oversees the operational command of 6,500 uniformed health officers who serve in locations around the world to promote, pro- tect, and advance the health of the American people. Dr. Benjamin is founder and former CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic in Alabama, former associate dean for rural health at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine in Mobile, and immediate past chair of the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States. She was the first physician under age 40 and the first African-American woman to be elected to the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. She served as president of the American Medical Association (AMA) Educa- tion and Research Foundation and chair of the AMA’s Council on Ethi- cal and Judicial Affairs. In 2002, she became president of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama, making her the first African Ameri- can female president of a state medical society in the United States. Dr. Benjamin is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. She was a Kellogg National Fellow and a Rockefeller Next Generation Leader. She serves on numer- ous boards, including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, Catholic Health Associa- tion, and Morehouse School of Medicine. In 1998, Dr. Benjamin was the U.S. recipient of the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights. Dr. Benjamin has a B.S. in chemistry from Xavier University, New Orleans; an M.D. from the University of Alabama, Birmingham; an M.B.A. from Tulane University; and five honorary doctorates. She at- tended Morehouse School of Medicine and completed her family medi- cine residency in Macon, Georgia. She also established a clinic in a small fishing village in Alabama to help its uninsured residents. Thomas E. Bernard, Ph.D. is a professor in the College of Public Health and chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of South Florida. His primary research interest is

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168 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL heat stress exposure assessment. In particular, he has proposed methods to account for protective clothing in the context of occupational exposure guidelines pertaining to customary heat stress. In addition, Dr. Bernard investigates the use of personal monitoring to limit heat stress exposures or to demonstrate good management practices. He has also consulted with government and industry on heat stress management. In addition to his teaching responsibilities in occupational health and safety, Dr. Ber- nard is the current president of the board of directors of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. He is a current member and past chair of the ACGIH Physical Agents Committee. Dr. Bernard earned his Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, and he holds engineering degrees from Carnegie Mellon University. Bruce Clements, M.P.H. serves as preparedness director at the Texas Department of State Health Services where he is responsible for health and medical preparedness and response programs ranging from pandemic influenza to the health impact of hurricanes. He holds undergraduate de- grees in disaster preparedness, bioenvironmental engineering, and busi- ness administration, and a master of public health degree. His military experience includes more than 23 years of service with assignments that include serving as a nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare defense instructor and as a public health officer. He has also served as the public health preparedness director for the state of Missouri and as an infection control occupational health intervention manager at BJC Healthcare. He has lectured extensively on public health preparedness topics, published peer-reviewed articles and books on preparedness, and served as a media resource for outlets such as CNN, FOX News, National Public Radio, and the Associated Press. Sheldon Cohen, Ph.D. is the Robert E. Doherty Professor of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also an adjunct professor of pathol- ogy and psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School as well as a member of the Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Dr. Cohen’s work focuses on the roles of stress, affect, and social support systems in health and well-being. He has published theoretical and empirical work on the effects of aircraft noise on the health and development of school children and on the roles of stress and social networks in physical and mental health. Over the past 25 years he has studied the effects of psychological stress, social support, and social status on immunity and susceptibility to

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169 APPENDIX E infectious disease. This work attempts to identify the neuroendocrine, immune, and behavioral pathways that link stress, personality, and social networks to disease susceptibility. He is also involved in studies of the effects of psychosocial factors on the onset and progression of asthma, and on the effectiveness of social support interventions in facilitating psychological adjustment and disease progression in women with breast cancer. His current work focuses on how interpersonal dispositions and behaviors influence immunity and host resistance to infectious disease. He is the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Psychology, the American Psychological Society’s James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for out- standing lifetime contribution to research in applied psychology, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Mary Currier, M.D., M.P.H. became Mississippi’s state health officer in 2010 after serving as state epidemiologist from 1993 to 2003, and again from 2007 to 2009. Prior to serving as state epidemiologist, she was a medical consultant with the agency. Dr. Currier began her public health career with the Mississippi State Department of Health as a staff physician for the prenatal care, family planning, STD, and pediat- rics programs. Dr. Currier received her M.D. from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in 1983 and her master’s in public health from the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1987. Brenda Eskenazi, Ph.D. (planning committee member) is the Maxwell Professor of Maternal and Child Health and Epidemiology at the Univer- sity of California (UC), Berkeley, School of Public Health. She is direc- tor of the UC Berkeley Center for Excellence in Children’s Environmental Health Research, which investigates pesticide and other chemical exposures and their health effects on pregnant women and their children with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a neuropsycholo- gist and epidemiologist, she has spent more than 30 years examining the effects of environmental exposures on male and female fertility, preg- nancy, and children’s health and development, and she has studied nu- merous agents including cigarette smoke, environmental tobacco smoke, benzene and other solvents, lead, manganese, dioxin, organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, flame retardants, as well as other environ- mental agents. Dr. Eskenazi is a fellow of the American College of Epi- demiology and is on the editorial boards of the American Journal of

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170 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL Epidemiology, Environmental Health Perspectives, and Journal of Envi- ronmental and Public Health. She was a member of the National Acad- emy of Sciences Board on Children, Youth, and Families and is currently a member of the Expert Committee for the Stockholm Convention. William H. Farland, Ph.D. is the vice president for research at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado. He is also a profes- sor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sci- ences, School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. In 2006, Dr. Farland was appointed deputy assistant administrator for science in the EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD). He had served as the acting deputy assistant administrator since 2001. He served as the EPA’s acting science advisor throughout 2005. Formerly, he was the di- rector of the ORD’s National Center for Environmental Assessment. In 2002, Dr. Farland was recognized by the Society for Risk Analysis with the Outstanding Risk Practitioner Award, and in 2005 was appointed as a fellow of the society. In 2007, he was elected as a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Farland holds a Ph.D. from University of California, Los Angeles, in cell biology and biochemistry. Alexander G. Garza, M.D., M.P.H. is the assistant secretary for health affairs and chief medical officer of the Department of Homeland Secu- rity. He manages the department’s medical and health security matters; oversees the health aspects of contingency planning for all chemical, bio- logical, radiological, and nuclear hazards; and leads a coordinated effort to ensure that the department is prepared to respond to biological and chemical weapons of mass destruction. Prior to joining the department in August 2009, Dr. Garza spent 13 years as a practicing physician and medical educator. He most recently served as the director of military programs at the ER One Institute at the Washington Hospital Center, and he has served as the associate medical director of the emergency medical services (EMS) for the state of New Mexico, and director of EMS for the Kansas City, Missouri, health department. While practicing medicine he also served as a professor at leading medical institutions including Georgetown University, the University of New Mexico, and the Univer- sity of Missouri–Kansas City. Dr. Garza served in the U.S. Army Re- serve and was a battalion surgeon and public health team chief during Operation Flintlock in Dakar, Senegal. He also served as a public health team chief during Operation Iraqi Freedom and as a special investigator and medical expert for Major General Raymond Odierno. He holds an

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171 APPENDIX E M.D. from the University of Missouri–Columbia School of Medicine, a master’s of public health from the Saint Louis University School of Pub- lic Health, and a B.S in biology from the University of Missouri–Kansas City. Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is a pro- fessor of environmental health sciences at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her areas of focus are children’s environmental health research, public health preparedness, and environ- mental health policy. She has joint appointments in the Departments of Health Policy and Management and Epidemiology and in Emergency Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. From 1993 to 1998, Dr. Goldman served as assistant administrator for the EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances. Between 1985 and 1993, Dr. Goldman served at the California Department of Health Services, most recently as head of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control. She has a B.S. from UC Berkeley, a master’s in public health from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, an M.D. from UC San Francisco, and pediatric training at Children’s Hospi- tal, Oakland, California. She has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC Lead Poisoning Preven- tion Advisory Committee. Dr. Goldman is a member of the Institute of Medicine and vice chairman of the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences. Bernard D. Goldstein, M.D. is a professor of environmental and occu- pational health and the former dean of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a physician, board certified in internal medicine, hematology, and toxicology. He is an elected member of the IOM and of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Dr. Goldstein served as assistant administrator for research and development at the EPA from 1983 to 1985. He has chaired a dozen National Research Council (NRC) and IOM committees and is a member of the IOM Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, as well as the National Academy of Sciences Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. He has been president of the Society for Risk Analysis, is currently editor-in-chief of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), and has served as a member or chairperson of numerous U.S. governmental and World Health Organiza-

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172 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL tion committees, including chairperson of the NIH Toxicology Study Section and the EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He was the initial chair of the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Jimmy Guidry, M.D. is currently the state health officer of Louisiana, and he also serves as the medical director for the Department of Health & Hospitals (DHH). Prior to this, Dr. Guidry served as the assistant sec- retary for the Office of Public Health from October 1996 through Janu- ary 2000, and as the medical director of the Acadian region from April 1990 through April 1991. In addition, Dr. Guidry served as the director of adolescent services at Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Medicine, Pediatric Department, Earl K. Long Hospital, from January 1985 to March 1990. He also worked in pediatric private practice from July 1981 through December 1984. Dr. Guidry presently chairs various task forces, including the DHH Obesity Task Force, the Child Death Re- view Panel, and the Governor’s Task Force on Tuberculosis. He received his B.S. degree from the University of Southwestern in 1974, earned his doctorate from the LSU School of Medicine in 1978, and completed his residency at Earl K. Long Hospital in 1981. He has been board certified since 1984 and is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. John Howard, M.D., M.P.H., J.D., LL.M. is the director of the Na- tional Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, DC. Prior to his appointment as director of NIOSH, Dr. Howard served as chief of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health in the California Department of Industrial Relations from 1991 through 2002. Dr. Howard received his M.D. from Loyola University of Chicago in 1974, his master’s of public health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1982, his doctor of law from the UCLA in 1986, and his master of law in administrative law from the George Washington University in Washington, DC, in 1987. Dr. Howard is board certified in internal medicine and occupational medicine. He is admitted to the practice of medicine and law in the State of California and in the District of Columbia, and he is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court bar. He has written numerous articles on occupa- tional health law and policy. Blanca Laffon, Ph.D. is an associate professor at the University of A Coruña, Spain. Her area of scientific activity is the study of the effect of pollutants on organisms, especially at the molecular and cytogenetic

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173 APPENDIX E level. During her 13 years of professional research activity, she has con- ducted several studies in vitro and in human populations aimed to evalu- ate the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity associated with exposure to chemical substances present in the environment. In 1996, she earned her bachelor in pharmacy with honors and an extraordinary award and her honors degree from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain. She received her Ph.D. in pharmacy from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, with honors and an extraordinary award in 2001. She is also a postgraduate in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics (2002, University of Barcelona, Spain) and in genetic and molecular epi- demiology (2006, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain). Maureen Y. Lichtveld, M.D., M.P.H. (planning committee member) has a 28-year career in public health and currently is a professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Her research interests include environmentally induced disease such as asthma and cancer, en- vironmental health policy, community-based participatory research, dis- aster preparedness, and public health systems. She holds an endowed chair in environmental policy and was also appointed as associate direc- tor, population sciences of the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium. Dr. Lichtveld is the principal investigator and chair of the Steering Committee for Head of Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL), an NIH-funded study. She provides scientific oversight for all clinical, envi- ronmental, and community engagement aspects of this novel pediatric asthma intervention examining the relationship between exposure to post-Katrina mold and exacerbation of childhood asthma. Dr. Lichtveld also serves on the Science Board of the American Public Health Associa- tion. She was recently elected as the chair of the Environmental and Oc- cupational Health Council of the Association of Schools of Public Health. Dr. Lichtveld completed a successful 18-year career at the CDC in several leadership capacities. During her tenure at CDC, Dr. Lichtveld received numerous honors, including Special Service Award for her par- ticipation in the aftermath of September 11, 2001; Public Health Service Special Recognition Award; and CDC Environmental Health Scientist of the Year. Paul J. Lioy, Ph.D. is a professor and vice chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) Robert Wood Johnson Medical

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174 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL School (RWJMS), Piscataway, New Jersey. He is deputy director for government relations and director of exposure science at the Environ- mental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute of Rutgers University and UMDNJ-RWJMS. Dr. Lioy is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the EPA, and he was on the National Research Council Board on Toxicology and Environmental Studies. He has been a member of or chaired National Research Council committees and Science Advisory Board committees. He was also the co-chair of the World Trade Center Expert Technical Panel from 2004 to 2006. He is a fellow of the Col- legium Ramazzini, Carpi, Italy, and was also a founder and past- president of the International Society for Exposure Science. He was an academic councilor to the New Jersey Legislature and was chair of the Clean Air Council. Dr. Lioy has been executive editor or associate editor of scientific journals and is currently an associate editor of the Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives and the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. He recently published the book, Dust: The Inside Story of Its Role in the September 11th Aftermath, which was written to discuss what was learned, the unknowns, and ways the gov- ernment and public can evaluate and prepare in the face of any future natural or terrorist events. Nicole Lurie, M.D., M.S.P.H. is the assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to that, she was senior natural scientist and the Paul O’Neill Alcoa Professor of Health Policy at the RAND Corporation. There she directed RAND’s public health and preparedness work as well as RAND’s Center for Population Health and Health Disparities. She has previously served in federal government as principal deputy assistant secretary of health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; in state government as medical advisor to the commissioner at the Minnesota Department of Health; and in academia as professor in the University of Minnesota Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Lurie has a long history in the health services research field, primarily in the areas of access to and quality of care, managed care, mental health, prevention, public health infrastructure, and preparedness and health disparities. Dr. Lurie attended college and medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, and she completed her residency and M.S.P.H. at UCLA, where she was also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar. She serves as senior editor for Health Services Research and has served on editorial boards and as a reviewer for numerous journals. She has served on the council

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175 APPENDIX E and was president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, is cur- rently on the board of directors for the Academy of Health Services Re- search, and has served on multiple other national committees. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Finally, Dr. Lurie continues to prac- tice clinical medicine in the health care safety net in Washington, DC. Mike Magee, M.D. is president of Positive Medicine Inc., a strategic health communications firm. In 2007, with input from the United Na- tions, Dr. Magee launched the Healthy-Waters Movement to educate the public regarding the topic of water and to mobilize health professionals on behalf of our environment. Working with the creative team that pro- duced Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth, Dr. Magee produced the Healthy-Waters Tour, a 1-hour, high-impact, big-screen presentation that addresses the relationship between water and agriculture, industry, en- ergy, urban policy, disaster management, population growth, war, and disease. Dr. Magee has served as a senior fellow in the humanities to the World Medical Association, a David Rockefeller Fellow, and a master scholar at New York University School of Medicine. He is a past- president of the National Association of Physician Broadcasters and past chairman of the board of Very Special Arts (VSA) for the Disabled at the Kennedy Center. Daniel R. Masys, M.D. is professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. An honors graduate of Princeton University (biochemistry and molecular genetics) and the Ohio State University College of Medicine, he com- pleted postgraduate training in internal medicine, hematology, and medi- cal oncology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and the Naval Regional Medical Center, San Diego. Dr. Masys served as chief of the International Cancer Research Data Bank of the National Cancer In- stitute, National Institutes of Health, and was director of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, which is the computer research and development division of the National Library of Medicine. Prior to joining Vanderbilt, Dr. Masys was director of Biomedical Infor- matics and professor of medicine at UCSD and medical director of UCSD’s Human Research Protections Program (IRB). Dr. Masys is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. He is board certified in hematology and medical oncology, a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and a fellow and past-president of the American College of Medical Informatics. He was a founding associ-

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176 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL ate editor of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Associa- tion, and he has received numerous awards including the NIH Director’s Award and the U.S. Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal. Thomas Matte, M.D., M.P.H. is a professor of urban public health in the environmental and occupational health science track at Hunter Col- lege at the City University of New York School of Public Health. Prior to joining the Hunter in 2010, he served as a medical epidemiologist at the National Center for Environmental Health and the New York City De- partment of Health and Mental Hygiene. At the health department, Dr. Matte directed studies to improve population exposure assessment, sur- veillance, and prevention of illness and death related to extreme heat and air pollution. He also participated in public health responses to the World Trade Center attacks and anthrax cases in 2001, the 2003 blackout, and the H1N1 outbreak in 2009. His prior work included studies of pathways, risk factors, and prevention of lead exposure; asthma in daycare popula- tions; prenatal and early life exposures and their relationship to later health; and public health program evaluation. Linda A. McCauley, Ph.D., FAAN, R.N. (planning committee member) is a professor and the dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Wood- ruff School of Nursing. Dr. McCauley has special expertise in the design of epidemiological investigations of environmental hazards and is na- tionally recognized for her expertise in occupational and environmental health nursing. Her work aims to identify culturally appropriate interven- tions to decrease the impact of environmental and occupational health hazards in vulnerable populations, including workers and young children. Dr. McCauley was previously the associate dean for research and the Nightingale Professor in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She received a bachelor of nursing degree from the University of North Carolina, a master’s in nursing from Emory, and a Ph.D. in environmental health and epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. She became a member of the Institute of Medicine in 2008 and previously served on the committees for Update 2006 and Update 2008 in the Veterans and Agent Orange series. Kenneth Olden, Ph.D., Sc.D., L.H.D. (planning committee member) was recently appointed founding dean of the School of Public Health at the City University of New York. He is former director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and director of the

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177 APPENDIX E National Toxicology Program (NTP). He was the first African American to become director of 1 of the 18 institutes of the National Institutes of Health during the history of the agency. Before going to NIEHS, he was director of the Howard University Cancer Center and professor and chairman of the Department of Oncology at Howard University Medical School, Washington, DC. He joined Howard in 1979 as associate direc- tor for research after a stint at the National Institutes of Health, first as a senior staff fellow, then expert, then research biologist in the Division of Cancer Biology and Diagnosis at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Olden is the recipient of numerous awards, including the City of Medi- cine Award and an inaugural award for public policy leadership in pro- tecting health and the environment by the National Association of Physicians for the Environment. He earned his bachelor’s degree in biol- ogy from Knoxville College, his master’s degree at the University of Michigan, and his doctoral degree from Temple University, with re- search done at the University of Rochester. He is a member of the Insti- tute of Medicine. Howard J. Osofsky, M.D., Ph.D. is the Kathleen and John Bricker Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUHSC). Under his leadership, LSUHSC’s Department of Psychiatry has expanded services for the underserved in New Orleans. He has played an important role in developing community psychosocial preparedness programs for first responders and mental health professionals to improve responses following disaster and terror- ism. He is co-director of the Louisiana Rural Trauma Services Center (LRTSC), part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Dr. Osofsky was asked to be clinical di- rector for Louisiana Spirit, the Department of Health and Hospital’s Cri- sis Counseling Program under the Stafford Disaster Act. At the request of the mayor of New Orleans, he led services for first responders and their families and worked with reopening schools in devastated parishes. He has consulted and provided training in New York following 9/11, in China and Taiwan following earthquakes and typhoons, and in Chile fol- lowing the recent earthquake. In 2010, he received the Humanitarian Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the Distinguished Public Service Award from New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Departments of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Weill Cornell Medical Colleges, and a Presidential

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178 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL Commendation at the Distinguished Fellows Convocation at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. Edward Overton, Ph.D. is currently a professor emeritus in the De- partment of Environmental Sciences, School of the Coast and Environ- ment at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Until his retirement in May 2009, he was the Clairborne Professor of Environmental Toxi- cology and Air Quality, and he is the founder and chairman of the Board of Analytical Specialists Inc., a technology start-up company commer- cializing Overton’s invention of a small, fast, portable Gas Chromatog- raphy instrument. Dr. Overton was the lead chemist for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hazardous Materials Response Divi- sion for more than 25 years, providing chemical hazard assessments for oil and hazardous chemical spills in all marine areas under U.S. jurisdic- tion. His expertise includes the detection and fates and effects of petro- leum hydrocarbons in the environment. Lawrence Palinkas, Ph.D. is the Albert G. and Frances Lomas Feldman Professor of Social Policy and Health in the School of Social Work at the University of Southern California (USC). He also holds appointments in the Departments of Anthropology and Preventive Medicine at USC and is an adjunct professor of medicine and family and preventive medicine at the University of California, San Diego. A medical anthropologist, his research interests focus on implementation science, community-based participatory research, the sociocultural and environ-mental determinants of health and health-related behavior, and health disparities. His current research encompasses mental, immigrant, and global health and includes studies of the mental health needs of individuals in extreme and unusual environments and communities impacted by manmade disasters; cultural explanatory models of mental illness and service utilization; evaluation of academic–community research practice partnerships; and the implementation of evidence-based practices for delivery of mental health services. He has served as deputy chief officer of the Life Sciences Standing Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research in 2002; chair of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute’s External Advisory Council in 2003; and as a committee member for the National Academies. He is the recipient of the Antarctic Service Medal by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Navy. Dr. Palinkas is also an elected fellow of the American Anthropological Association and Society for Applied Anthropology.

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179 APPENDIX E Irwin Redlener, M.D. is professor of clinical population and family health and director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, and he is 1 of 10 members of the congressionally established National Commission on Children and Disasters. Dr. Redlener speaks and writes extensively on national disaster preparedness policies, pandemic influenza, the threat of terrorism in the United States, and related issues. Dr. Redlener is also president and cofounder of the Children’s Health Fund and has expertise in health care systems, crisis response, and public policy with respect to access to health care for under-served populations. Dr. Redlener, a pediatrician, has worked extensively in the Gulf region following Hurricane Katrina, where he helped establish ongoing medical and public health programs. He also organized medical response teams in the immediate aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks on 9/11 and has had disaster manage- ment leadership experience internationally and nationally. He is the author of Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisas- ters and What We Can Do Now, published in August 2006 by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Linda Rosenstock, M.D., M.P.H. (planning committee member) is cur- rently dean of the UCLA School of Public Health. Prior to this position, she served as director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), where she was instrumental in creating a frame- work for guiding occupational safety and health research. This agenda was developed in collaboration with 500 external partners. Dr. Rosen- stock has been active internationally in teaching and research in occupa- tional and environmental health and has served as an advisor to the World Health Organization. She has expertise in occupational and envi- ronmental medicine health care delivery as well as in the role of federal government in health sciences research and policy. She is a recipient of the Presidential Distinguished Executive Rank Award and was elected to the IOM in 1995. Nalini Sathiakumar, M.D., Dr.P.H. is associate director of the Spark- man Center for Global Health and associate professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). Her area of research includes environmental and occupational epidemiology, and her work spans South Asia and the United States. She is the principal investigator of the UAB-South Asia International Train- ing and Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (ITREOH)

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180 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL now in its ninth year of funding from the NIH-Fogarty International Cen- ter. Partnering with three premier institutions in Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka for the ITREOH, Dr. Sathiakumar’s research centers on air pollu- tion (indoor and outdoor), heavy metals, and pesticides with a special focus on the adverse health effects in pregnant mothers and young chil- dren. She has also investigated the acute effects of the oil spill from the Greek supertanker, the Tasman Spirit, which ran aground in Karachi, Pakistan. Besides research, she has developed curriculum and initiated the M.P.H. program in applied epidemiology in two of the three interna- tional institutions. In the United States, Dr. Sathiakumar’s research has mainly focused on occupational health. Her research includes follow-up studies of workers in the synthetic rubber, petroleum, chemical, plastics, semiconductor, and pesticide manufacturing industries. Dr. Sathiakumar has a fellowship in pediatric medicine and a doctoral degree in epidemi- ology with a specialization in environmental and occupational health. She is the recipient of the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and a UN-USA Birmingham Chapter award for outstanding public health service. David A. Savitz, Ph.D. (planning committee member) is the Charles W. Bluhdorn Professor of Community and Preventive Medicine and director of epidemiology, biostatistics, and disease prevention at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He was assistant professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and moved to the University of North Carolina School of Public Health in 1985. He served as the Carey C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology until the end of 2005. His teaching is focused on epidemiologic methods, and he recently authored a book titled Interpreting Epidemiologic Evi- dence. He directed 29 doctoral dissertations at the University of North Carolina and 13 master’s theses. He has served as editor at the American Journal of Epidemiology and as a member of the Epidemiology and Dis- ease Control-1 study section of the National Institutes of Health and cur- rently is an editor at Epidemiology. He was president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and the Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epi- demiologic Research and North American regional councilor for the In- ternational Epidemiological Association. His primary research activities and interests are in reproductive, environmental, and cancer epidemiol- ogy. Dr. Savitz received his undergraduate training in psychology at Brandeis University, a master’s in preventive medicine at Ohio State

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181 APPENDIX E University in 1978, and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health in 1982. Peter S. Spencer, Ph.D., FRCPath. is professor of neurology in the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Medicine, a sen- ior scientist in the OHSU Center for Research on Occupational and Envi- ronmental Toxicology (CROET), and founding director of the OHSU Global Health Center. Previously, Dr. Spencer was a professor of neuro- science, neurology, and pathology-neuropathology, and the director of New York’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECM) Institute of Neurotoxicology. He moved to Portland to found the CROET, an OHSU research institute that he directed for 21 years. Dr. Spencer has served on the Science Advisory Board, National Center for Toxicological Re- search; on the National Advisory Environmental Health Science Council; and on boards and committees of the National Research Council and In- stitute of Medicine. At OHSU, he has led federally funded research ini- tiatives addressing the response of the nervous system to chemical exposures, including the Portland Environmental Hazards Research Cen- ter, a Superfund Basic Research Center, and a Child Health and Neuro- toxicogenomics Research Center. His body of research on the etiology and pathogenesis of human neurological disease, including a focus on the neurotoxicology of petroleum chemicals, has received national and inter- national recognition. He is presently collaborating with the Chinese Cen- ters for Disease Control and Prevention in a joint effort to seek the genetic basis of an individual’s susceptibility to occupational hydro- carbon solvent neurotoxicity. An experienced neurotoxicologist, Dr. Spencer received his baccalaureate and doctoral degrees from the Uni- versity of London and underwent postdoctoral training at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he was named Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Fellow in the Neurosciences. Mathy V. Stanislaus, J.D. is the assistant administrator for the EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. Mr. Stanislaus is responsible for the EPA’s programs on hazardous and solid waste management, hazardous waste clean-up including corrective action, under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Superfund and federal facilities clean-up and redevelopment, Brownfields, oil spill prevention and response, chemical accident prevention and preparedness, underground storage tanks, and emergency response. Prior to assuming his current position, Mr. Stanislaus cofounded and codirected the New

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182 ASSESSING THE HUMAN HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE GULF OIL SPILL Partners for Community Revitalization, a New York not-for-profit or- ganization whose mission is to advance the renewal of New York’s low- and moderate-income neighborhoods and communities of color through the redevelopment of Brownfields sites. Mr. Stanislaus has also been an advisor to other federal government agencies, Congress, and the United Nations on a variety of environmental issues. Ana M. Viamonte Ros, M.D., M.P.H. is Florida’s first state surgeon general and the first woman and Cuban American to serve as head of the department. She is charged to act as the state’s leading advocate for wellness and disease prevention. Dr. Viamonte Ros is a member of sev- eral health advisory groups focused on the health of Florida’s children, including the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, the Governor’s Task Force on Autism Spectrum Disorders, and the Children and Youth Cabinet. Dr. Viamonte Ros came to the Department of Health from Ar- mor Correctional Health Services, where she oversaw the clinical opera- tions of Florida’s eight largest jail systems, as well as three correctional facilities in Virginia. She has also volunteered with programs such as the Camillus House Homeless Initiative in Miami, the Health through Walls Organization in the Caribbean, and the Brookside Community Health Center in Massachusetts. Throughout her entire career, she has been a strong advocate for disadvantaged individuals and minority communities. In 1983, the surgeon general earned her M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine, graduating with several awards and honors. In 2005, Dr. Viamonte Ros received her master’s of public health from the Harvard School of Public Health. LuAnn E. White, Ph.D., D.A.B.T. is the director of the Tulane Center for Applied Environmental Public Health (CAEPH) at Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She is a toxicologist and professor in the Department of Environmental Health. She directs the Academic Partners of Excellence for the Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Network funded by the CDC. She also directs the New Orleans Study Center for the NIH National Children’s Study. Dr. White’s re- search focuses on environmental factors that impact children’s health, particularly childhood lead poisoning and environmental triggers of asthma. She also studies other vulnerable populations including the eld- erly affected by Hurricane Katrina. She also works on several studies with the EPHT network on the impact of air pollutants on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Dr. White has been a leader in developing mod-

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183 APPENDIX E els for environmental health training and education programs. She initi- ated the first master’s degree programs in environmental and occupa- tional health using distance learning technologies in 1994. Currently, CAEPH offers four master’s degree programs by distance learning to build capacity among environmental and occupational health profession- als. Dr. White received her Ph.D. and completed a NIH postdoctoral fel- lowship at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, Louisiana. Donald E. Williamson, M.D. was appointed state health officer and director of the Alabama Department of Public Health in 1992 after serving as director of the Bureau of Preventive Health Services from 1988 to 1992. Prior to that, he was director of the Division of Disease Control. Before joining the Alabama Department of Public Health, Dr. Williamson served as state tuberculosis control officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. Dr. Williamson has been the recipient of a number of awards, including the 2009 Wallace Alexander Clyde Award from Children’s Hospital, the 2000 Arthur T. McCormack Award from the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials for dedication and excellence in public health, and the 1999 Child Health Advocate Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics. On a na- tional level, Dr. Williamson serves on the Region IV Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Advisory Council. He served on the Executive Committee of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and was president of the association from 1997 to 1998. He served as a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, the Board of Directors of the Public Health Foundation, and the Steering Committee on Access for the Uninsured of the National Academy for State Health Policy. Dr. Williamson received his medical degree, cum laude, from the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in 1979. He completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of Vir- ginia Hospital in 1982 and is board certified in that specialty.

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