F
Committee Biographies

David J. Duquette (co-chair) is a professor of metallurgical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He received his Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1968. Following his postgraduate work, he performed research on elevated temperature materials, joining the Rensselaer faculty in 1970. He is the author or co-author of more than 160 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of environmental degradation of materials and electrochemical processing of semiconductor interconnects. He is a recipient of the Whitney Award of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for his contributions to corrosion science, and an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award. He is a fellow of ASM International and of NACE International. Dr. Duquette’s research interests include the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of metals and alloys, with special reference to studies of environmental interactions. Current projects include studies of aqueous and elevated temperature corrosion phenomena, the effects of corrosive environments on fatigue behavior, the environmental cracking of alloys, and the role of corrosion science in understanding the planarization of metal interconnects on semiconductor devices, and electrodeposition of semiconductor interconnects. A fundamental understanding of material environment interactions is critical to engineering application of metallic materials. Dr. Duquette was a member of the now completed National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Electrochemical Corrosion.


Robert E. Schafrik (co-chair) is currently the general manager, Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aviation. He is responsible for developing



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F Committee Biographies David J. Duquette (co-chair) is a professor of metallurgical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He received his Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1968. Following his post- graduate work, he performed research on elevated temperature materials, joining the Rensselaer faculty in 1970. He is the author or co-author of more than 160 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of environmental degradation of materials and electrochemical processing of semiconductor interconnects. He is a recipient of the Whitney Award of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for his contributions to corrosion science, and an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award. He is a fellow of ASM International and of NACE International. Dr. Duquette’s research interests include the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of metals and alloys, with special reference to studies of environmental interactions. Current projects include studies of aqueous and elevated temperature corrosion phenomena, the effects of corrosive environments on fatigue behavior, the environmental cracking of alloys, and the role of corrosion science in under- standing the planarization of metal interconnects on semiconductor devices, and electrodeposition of semiconductor interconnects. A fundamental understanding of material environment interactions is critical to engineering application of metal- lic materials. Dr. Duquette was a member of the now completed National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Electrochemical Corrosion. Robert E. Schafrik (co-chair) is currently the general manager, Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aviation. He is responsible for developing 

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research oPPortunities corrosion science engineering 0 in and advanced materials and processes used in GE’s aeronautical turbine engines and their marine and industrial derivatives. He oversees materials application engineer- ing activities supporting GE Aviation’s global design engineering, manufacturing, and field support activities. He also operates a state-of-the-art in-house laboratory for advanced materials development, characterization, and failure analysis. Prior to joining GE in 1997, he served in 2 concurrent positions within the NRC, which he joined in 1991: staff director, National Materials Advisory Board, and staff director, Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Under his direction, 33 final reports for studies were issued that addressed significant national issues in materials and manufacturing. Dr. Schafrik also served in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of R&D and system acquisition capacities; he retired as a lieutenant colonel. He has a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University, an M.S. in information systems from George Mason University, an M.S. in aerospace engi- neering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. Aziz I. Asphahani is presently serving as senior advisor to the “Corrosion Engineer- ing” Curriculum Development at the University of Akron. He is also the CEO of Advanced Motion Technologies (a BioMechanics/Gait analysis start-up company). Dr. Asphahani served as the CEO of CARUS Chemical Company (1995-2005), following 20 years in the specialty metals industry with HAYNES International/ CABVAL, where he served as CABVAL president, HAYNES vice president, direc- tor of R&D and corrosion engineer (1975-1995). Dr. Asphahani’s degrees include “Diplome Ingenieur”-physics from Ecole Centrale de Paris (1970) and Ph.D. in materials science from MIT (1975). He holds 8 patents and authored 61 papers on corrosion of high-performance alloys. Two products of his patents won the 1991 R&D 100 Award and the 1984 Vaaler Award. Dr. Asphahani is a NACE fellow and ASM fellow. He served as ASM president (2001), on the boards of directors of NACE International, the NACE Education Foundation, the Chemical Education Foundation, and the American Chemistry Council Board. Dr. Asphahani is pres- ently serving on the ASM Education Foundation board of directors, on the board of trustees of the Alpha-Sigma-Mu Honor Society, and the board of directors of the Goldin Institute. gordon P. Bierwagen is a professor in the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at North Dakota State University (NDSU). He received his B.S. in chem- istry and mathematics from Valparaiso University in 1964, his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Iowa State University in 1968. In 1989, he joined the Polymers and Coatings Department at NDSU as professor. He has trained 14 Ph.D.’s and 8 M.S. students in his time at NDSU. He was chair of the Polymers and Coatings Depart- ment from 1999 to 2006. Dr. Bierwagen has recently been the leader in the invention

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aPPendix f  of a new method of protecting aluminum alloys against corrosion without the use of chromate pigments or pretreatments by using magnesium pigments in coatings in a manner analogous to t Zn particles in Zinc rich paints. He and his co-workers have recently introduced the used of ionic liquids in studying the electrochemistry of coatings enabling the characterization of water transport out of coatings. He has authored or coauthored more than 120 refereed journal articles. His profes- sional activities include being editor-in-chief (1995-present) and North American regional editor (1987-1995). He is currently on the Scientific Program Commit- tee for CoSI, the annual Coating Science International Meeting held each June in Noordwijk, the Netherlands; the Scientific Program Committee for the AETOC (Advanced Electrochemical Techniques for Organic Coatings) 2009 Workshop to be held in Gardo, Italy, in April 2009; and is a member of the International Scien- tific Committee for 8th International Symposium on Electrochemical Impedance SpectroscopyEIS 2010, which was held in Algarve, Portugal, in June 2010. Darryl P. Butt is a professor and chair of materials science and engineering at Boise State University. He received his Ph.D. in ceramic science and his B.S. in ceramic science and engineering with a minor in technical writing from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Butt held several positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1991 and 1999. As a post-doctoral fellow he studied very-high- temperature hydrogen-solid reactions and thermodynamics of transition metal and actinide carbides. This work included developing planar laser induced fluorescence methods for characterizing and directly imaging plasmas produced during laser ablation processes, modeling gas-solid reactions, and modeling of binary, ternary, and quaternary phase diagrams. In 1994 he established the Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory within the Materials Science and Technology Division, where he lead efforts in a variety of areas, including aqueous and high- temperature oxidation of ceramics, alloys, and protective coatings, radiation effects on materials corrosion, gallium vaporization, sequestration of carbon dioxide, and development of high-temperature materials and seals, and carbon dioxide seques- tration. In 1998, Dr. Butt became the lead project leader for weapons dismantle- ment and fissile materials transparency where he managed and oversaw technical efforts and policy development related to a possible START III treaty, and Russian- U.S. lab-to-lab technical interactions in nuclear non-proliferation. From 1998 to 2000, on leave from LANL, Dr. Butt lead an $85 million DOE-industry program at Ceramatec, Inc., in collaboration with Air Products and Chemicals Company, to develop microchannel gas separation membranes for the production syngas from natural gas. His research lead to a number of key patents in the field. From 2000 to 2005 Dr. Butt was an associate professor at University of Florida in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, with close collaborations with the Depart- ment of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science. The author or co-author of

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research oPPortunities corrosion science engineering  in and approximately 160 publications and patents, Dr. Butt has received several awards, including a LANL 1994 Distinguished Performance Award and a 1999 Pollution Prevention Award for his research on Pu purification, and the American Ceramic Society’s 1992-1993 Nuclear Division Best Paper Award, and 1997 Robert L. Coble Award for Young Scholars. He received the best teacher award, or Triple Point Award, from the University of Florida College of Engineering in 2005 and was named Pro- fessor of the Year by Boise State University’s College of Engineering in 2008. Dr. Butt is a member of the American Ceramic Society and the Materials Research Society. He is currently an associate editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society and an affiliate of the Center for Advanced Energy Studies in Idaho Falls, Idaho. gerald S. Frankel is the DNV Chair and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Ohio State University (OSU). He is also director of the Fontana Corrosion Center. He earned the Sc.B. degree in materials science engineering from Brown University in 1978 and the Sc.D. degree in materials science and engineering from MIT in 1985. Prior to joining OSU in 1995, he was a post-doctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute in Zurich, Switzerland, and then a research staff member at the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. He has more than 200 publications, and his primary research interests are in the pas- sivation and localized corrosion of metals and alloys, corrosion inhibition, and protective coatings. He is past chair of the Corrosion Division of the Electrochemi- cal Society, past chair of the Research Committee of NACE, and a member of the editorial board of the journals Corrosion, Materials and Corrosion, and Corrosion Reiews. Dr. Frankel is a fellow of NACE International, the Electrochemical Society, and ASM International. He has received the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, the H.H. Uhlig Educators Award from NACE, and the Harrison Faculty Award and Lumley Research Award from the OSU College of Engineering. He was on sabbatical at the Max Planck Institute for Iron Research in Dusseldorf, Germany, in 2005 and a visiting professor at the University of Paris in 2008. Roger C. Newman is a professor in chemical engineering and applied chemistry at the University of Toronto. He has worked in corrosion research since he started his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge in 1977. From 1980 to 1984 he was at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he did basic research on corrosion and contributed to applied research programs associated with the Three Mile Island incident. Then he joined the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) as lecturer, progressing to professor by 1995. In 2004 he left to join the University of Toronto, where he holds an NSERC Senior Industrial Re- search Chair in association with the nuclear power industry. He has received most of the international awards for corrosion research, such as the Whitney Award

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aPPendix f  of NACE International, the Evans Award of the Institute of Corrosion, the Uhlig Award of the Corrosion Division of the Electrochemical Society, and the Fischer Medal of DECHEMA. His research specialties are pitting corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and alloying effects in corrosion. He has advised governments and indus- try in many countries, and serves, for example, as foreign member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max Planck Institute for Iron and Steel Research. Shari N. Rosenbloom is a manager in Exponent’s Mechanical Engineering and Materials/Metallurgy practice. Dr. Rosenbloom’s expertise is in metallurgical engi- neering and electrochemical testing of medical devices. Dr. Rosenbloom conducts failure analysis investigations in order to determine the cause of failure in a variety of industrial settings, as well as for biomedical applications. She has developed ex- pertise in analyzing a broad range of corrosion mechanisms (e.g., stress corrosion cracking, formicary corrosion, galvanic corrosion, underdeposit corrosion, pitting, erosion corrosion, cavitation, and general corrosion), as well mechanical failures (e.g., fatigue, overload, and failure due to manufacturing defects). Her work has focused on the failure modes of a number of metallic materials including steels, copper and copper-based alloys, aluminum alloys, and nickel-based alloys. She con- sults in a variety of industries including HVAC, petrochemical processing and refin- ing, food handling, pharmaceutical, and chemical processing. Dr. Rosenbloom also consults on the topic of biocompatibility of medical implants with regard to their corrosion resistance in the body. She has extensive experience in assessing resistance to pitting corrosion per ASTM F 2129 and galvanic corrosion per ASTM G 71, as well as in designing customized testing protocols. She has developed expertise in the corrosion behavior of a broad range of implant materials such as stainless steel, nitinol, titanium alloys, and cobalt-chromium based alloys. Lyle H. Schwartz (NAE) is a senior research scientist with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Maryland. He was professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University for 20 years and director of Northwestern’s Materials Research Center for five of those years. He then became director of the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology where he served for more than 12 years. His experience there included metals, ceramics, polymers, magnetic materials, techniques for characterization, and standardization of these charac- terization techniques, and his responsibilities included management of the R&D agenda in the context of a government laboratory. Dr. Schwartz subsequently as- sumed responsibility for basic research on structural materials of interest to the U.S. Air Force, in addition to the areas of propulsion, aeromechanics, and aerodynamics. He then completed his government service as director of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research with responsibility for the entire basic research program of the

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research oPPortunities corrosion science engineering  in and Air Force. His current interests include government policy for R&D, particularly for materials R&D, materials science education at K-12 levels, and enhanced public understanding of the roles and importance of technology in society. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Schwartz received both his B.S. in engineering and Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. John R. Scully is professor of materials science and engineering and co-director of Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering at the University of Virginia, which he joined in 1990. Previous to this, Dr. Scully served as a senior member of the technical staff in the metallurgy department of Sandia National Labora- tories and ship materials engineer at the David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center. Dr. Scully received his B.E.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University in materials science and engineering. His research interests focus on the relationship between material structure and composition and their environmental degradation or corrosion properties including hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, localized corrosion, and passivity. His corrosion research includes study of advanced aluminum, magnesium, titanium, ferrous and nickel-based alloys, stainless steels, as well as amorphous metals and intermetallic compounds. The development of methodologies for lifetime predic- tion engineering materials in corrosive environments is also of interest. Dr. Scully teaches materials science classes as well as classes on corrosion and electrochemical aspects of materials science at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. He is a fellow of the Electrochemical Society and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers. He received the A.B. Campbell and H.H. Uhlig Awards from NACE, the T.P. Hoar Award from the Institute of Corrosion (U.K.), and the Francis LaQue Award from ASTM for his research in corrosion. He is a past recipient of the Na- tional Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award. He is chair of the NACE awards committee and past chair of the NACE research committee. He is past chair of ASTM subcommittee G1.11 on electrochemical techniques in cor- rosion. He has served on the editorial boards of Corrosion Journal, Materials and Corrosion (Germany), and Metallurgical and Material Transactions. He served as a technical consultant to the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation Board in 2003, was a member of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Science Board Task Force on Corrosion Control in 2004, and was the chair and organizer of the 2004 Gordon Conference on Aqueous Corrosion. He is a member of the NRC’s Corro- sion Education Workshop Organizing Panel and the subsequent study group. Peter F. Tortorelli is the deputy director of the Materials Science and Technol- ogy Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He received his B.S. in physics from Manhattan College and his Ph.D. in metallurgy from the University of Illinois. He has extensive research experience in areas related to corrosion and

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aPPendix f  degradation of properties of materials in high-temperature, aggressive environ- ments, including gases, molten salts, and liquid metals, in the mechanical, physi- cal, and chemical behaviors of protective oxide layers that may form under such conditions, and in materials development of high-temperature alloys, ceramics, and ceramic composites for applications in fossil energy systems, gas turbines, fusion reactors, and energy-intensive industries. He served as leader of the Corrosion Sci- ence and Technology Group at ORNL for 7 years and has been involved in program management for the Basic Energy Sciences–Materials Science and Engineering and Fossil Energy Materials programs at ORNL. He was vice chair of the 2009 Gordon Research Conference on High Temperature Corrosion and is chair of the 2011 conference. Dr. Tortorelli was a panel lead for the Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Materials Behavior under Extreme Environments for the Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences in June 2007. David Trejo is currently a professor in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his bachelor’s, master’s, and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, with minors in electrochemistry and materials science. He has significant background in investigating, testing, assessing, and evaluating mechanisms of deterioration of various material and structural systems, including pipes, walls, foundations, bridges, water tanks, and other structures. He has participated on federal and state research investigating the physical, chemical, and electrochemical deterioration and repair of infrastructure systems and has published significantly in these areas. He has more than 10 years of experience in the construction and engineering industry, where he worked on many infrastructure projects, including testing and evaluating materials and structures for deterioration. Darrel F. untereker is vice president of research and technology at Medtronic, Inc. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Minnesota and a doctorate from the University of New York, Buffalo, both in chemistry. He fol - lowed that with post-doctoral work in surface science at the University of North Carolina. In 1991 he received his CER in business administration from Stanford University. He joined Medtronic, Inc., in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and has held several technical and managerial positions over the years involving power sources, materials science, and biomedical engineering of implantable medical devices. He has a broad range of interests in science, technology, and business and is currently applying his knowledge and interests to improve the design of future medical devices. Dr. Untereker has more than 60 publications in several fields, as well as 17 patents and has won many awards, including the Medtronic Star of Excel- lence, the Medtronic Outstanding Initiative Award, as well as being selected to the Bakken Society, which is the highest technical honor in Medtronic (named for Earl

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research oPPortunities corrosion science engineering  in and Bakken, the founder of Medtronic). He currently serves on the Bioengineering Board of the University of California, Berkeley, and has served in the past on the CIE (now IPRIME) Advisory Board of the University of Minnesota and the Stout Technical Advisory Board of the University of Wisconsin. He is also on the Coulter Committee at Duke University. He has served on the boards of directors on com - mercial companies. Dr. Untereker’s passion is for improving the quality of medical devices by applying scientific principles and understanding to their design and de- velopment. Outside Medtronic, he has served on many industrial advisory boards and was an associate editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society for 6 years as well as Battery Division editor for a number of years before that. In 2003 he was elected as a fellow in the Electrochemical Society. In 2006 he was selected as a fellow in the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is a 2006 winner of the Charles W. Britzius Distinguished Engineer Award for lifetime achievement in and service to the profession of engineering. He also spends a lot of time mentoring younger scientists and engineers. Mirna urquidi-Macdonald is a professor of engineering science and mechanics at Pennsylvania State University. She received a B.S. in physics and mathematics from ITESM, Monterrey, Mexico, an M.A. and Ph.D. in plasma physics from the University of Paris, Sud. Prior to joining Penn State, she was a senior research scien- tist at the Sciences and Technology Business Group at SRI International (Stanford Research Institute) in Menlo Park, California. Dr. Urquidi-Macdonald’s current research focuses on fuel cells, corrosion detection and assessment of underground pipelines, cathodic protection of underground structures, and corrosion and fail- ure analysis. An expert in energy and related technologies, she has been a NASA/ American Society for Engineering Education summer faculty fellow, an advisor to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Com- mittee, and a consultant to the U.S. Department of State on water-cooled nuclear reactors at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. She is an elected fellow of ASM International and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers. Dr. Urquidi-Macdonald’s work was cited among the “Great Advances in Science” by the Science Coalition in its report to the 105th Congress on the benefits of federally funded university-based research. Dr. Urquidi-Macdonald is the author or coauthor of more than 250 papers and publications and a recognized advocate for underrepresented groups at Penn State.