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C Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers David Bangsberg, M.Sc., M.D., M.P.H., has dedicated his career to the intersection between behavior and biology in impoverished populations. In the era of “Hit early, hit hard,” Dr. Bangsberg published a paper in JAMA that was among the first to argue that modifiable barriers to HIV antiret- roviral adherence, such as depression, substance use, and unstable housing, should be given equal priority as the biologic indications for treatment. In a series of studies in HIV-infected homeless and marginally housed people, he demonstrated that each HIV antiretroviral medication has a specific adherence, viral suppression, and resistance relationship determined by how resistance mutations impact on replication capacity under varying levels of adherence. As Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health, Dr. Bangsberg has the privilege of working with some of the best minds in global health science. Much of his time is devoted to cultivating strong international partnerships, sustainable infrastructure, efficient administrative policies, and mentoring young investigators to speed the response to global health challenges. Dr. Bangsberg is an accomplished investigator with continuous NIH funding since 1998, has more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, and was noted as the second highest funded NIH RO-1 investigator for HIV/AIDS in 2007. Grant Colfax, M.D., is the Director of HIV Prevention and Research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health. The HIV Prevention Sec- tion oversees multiple HIV prevention efforts throughout the city and cur- rently funds more than 30 community-based organizations that conduct HIV prevention work, including testing, counseling, syringe access, and 87

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88 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE other behavioral interventions for HIV-negative and HIV-positive persons. Under his direction the Section works to inform policies, laws, and other structural factors that influence HIV prevention. Dr. Colfax also serves as Governmental Co-Chair of the HIV Prevention Planning Council, the com- munity body that guides HIV prevention efforts for San Francisco. He is an NIH- and CDC-funded research scientist whose studies include clinical trials to reduce substance use among men who have sex with men, interven- tions to determine the efficacy of counseling interventions to reduce STDs, epidemiologic assessments of populations at high-risk for HIV, and the implementation of new HIV testing technologies. Dr. Colfax has authored multiple papers on the relationship between drug use and sexual risk which have appeared in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to his research activi- ties, Dr. Colfax is a clinician at the University of California San Francisco’s Positive Health Program, where he treats persons with AIDS and those at high-risk for HIV. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Colfax completed his Internal Medicine residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Wayne Duffus, M.D., Ph.D., graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, with an M.D. and Ph.D. in virology/cell biol- ogy. He completed residency training in internal medicine at the Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City and fellowship training in Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. He subsequently worked as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Offi- cer for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was stationed in Columbia, South Carolina. Dr. Duffus is currently an Associate Profes- sor with the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Infectious Diseases Division, where he sees HIV/AIDS patients. He is also affiliated with the Department of Health and Environmental Control as the Medical Director for the STD/HIV Division and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program pharmacy. Heather L. Hauck, M.S.W., LIC.S.W., is the Director of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Infectious Disease and Envi- ronmental Health Administration. The Maryland Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration leads statewide public health efforts to improve the health of Marylanders by reducing the transmission of infectious diseases, helping impacted persons live longer, healthier lives, and protecting individuals and communities from environmental health hazards. Ms. Hauck is the Ex Officio Chair of the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) and has been a member of the organization since 2003. She serves on NASTAD’s Executive Committee, Membership Committee, and the NASTAD Global Program Ethiopia team.

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89 APPENDIX C Prior to joining the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Ms. Hauck was an independent consultant providing technical assistance to hospitals, national associations, and state public health agencies on HIV program development issues. She served as the Section Chief of the New Hampshire HHS Division of Public Health STD/HIV Section in Concord, NH, from 2003 to 2006. Prior to her work in New Hampshire, Ms. Hauck was a co-director and a social worker in the Washington Hospital Center Social Work Department in Washington, DC. She has a Master of Social Work degree from the National Catholic School of Social Service, Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. David Holtgrave, Ph.D., a nationally recognized leader in HIV prevention and social science, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Health, Behavior and Society at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He also holds joint appointments in the Schools of Medicine and Nursing at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Holtgrave came to the Bloomberg School from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University where he was Professor and Vice-Chair of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education and Professor of Health Policy and Management. There, he also served as Director of the Behavioral & Social Science Core of the Center for AIDS Research. Prior to joining the faculty at Emory, Dr. Holtgrave oversaw HIV/AIDS services in the United States as Director of the Division of HIV/ AIDS Prevention: Intervention Research and Support in the National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 1997 to 2001. From 1991 until 1995, he worked at the CDC developing HIV prevention programs and researching the effec- tiveness and cost-effectiveness of a variety of HIV prevention interventions. He edited The Handbook of Economic Evaluation for HIV Prevention Programs and is the author or co-author of 200 professional publications. Dr. Holtgrave received his doctoral degree in quantitative psychology in 1988 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Harvard University School of Public Health. Michael Alan Horberg, M.D., M.A.S., F.A.C.P., is Director of HIV/AIDS program-wide for Kaiser Permanente and The Permanente Federation and Clinical Lead for HIV/AIDS for the Care Management Institute. He co- chairs the NCQA/AMA/HRSA/IDSA Expert Panel on HIV-related provider performance measures. Dr. Horberg also chairs the Central Research Com- mittee for KP Northern California. In that capacity, he also serves on the KPNC Health Services Institutional Review Board. He is a Clinical Instruc- tor at Stanford University Medical School and is a research scientist at the TPMG Division of Research. Dr. Horberg is a Fellow of the American

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90 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE College of Physicians, and he presently serves on the Board of Directors of the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Disease Society of America. Dr. Horberg is Past-President of the national Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. His HIV research interests are health service outcomes for HIV-infected patients (including HIV quality measures and care improve- ment, and determinants of optimized multidisciplinary care for maximized HIV outcomes), medication adherence issues in these patients, and epide- miology of the disease. He graduated from Boston University’s College of Liberal Arts and School of Medicine (with honors of summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa) and completed his internal medicine residency at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago (University of Chicago affiliate). He received his Master of Advanced Studies (Clinical Research) from University of Cali- fornia, San Francisco. Stewart Landers, J.D., M.C.P., is a senior consultant at John Snow, Inc. (JSI), based in Boston, Massachusetts, where he works on issues related to health care reform, chronic disease, wellness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse treatment, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) health. From 2007–2009, Mr. Landers served as Senior Program Director at the Mas- sachusetts Department of Public Health. In that role, he oversaw a variety of programs addressing wellness, obesity and overweight, chronic disease, primary care, school health, and violence and injury prevention, including the development of Mass in Motion, statewide effort in Massachusetts to combat overweight and obesity. In addition, he led a CDC-funded pilot initiative to support Integration of Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Programs in the context of the state’s health care reform efforts. At JSI, he has consulted with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) HIV/AIDS Bureau, leading a project to develop six self-assessment manuals for community based coalitions responsible for delivering services to people living with HIV and AIDS under the Ryan White Modernization Act. He has also conducted a collaborative research study with Harvard Medical School to evaluate quality improvement efforts for Ryan White care services. Beyond his work at JSI, Mr. Landers is an associate editor at the American Journal of Public Health and teaches Evaluation of Health Services at Tufts University. Kevin Lindamood, M.S.W., has worked at the intersection of homeless- ness and health since 1993 as an outreach worker, clinical social worker, city employee, community organizer, public policy advocate, fundraiser, and nonprofit administrator. He received a master’s degree in Social Work and Community Organization from the University of Michigan in 1997. Mr. Lindamood was a past organizer for the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, working to integrate direct service and advocacy at non-

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91 APPENDIX C profit organizations, and represented HCH in Baltimore during the annual legislative session of the Maryland General Assembly. His policy interests include health and homelessness, addiction treatment, mental health ser- vices, HIV/AIDS, affordable housing, disability assistance, and income dis- parity. Mr. Lindamood serves as Chair of the Maryland Medicaid Advisory Committee, as Co-Chair of the Policy Committee for the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, and as a Board member for the Maryland Citizen’s Health Initiative. Currently, Mr. Lindamood is the Vice President for External Affairs at Health Care for the Homeless, where he oversees the agency’s community relations, public policy, and financial development work. He also teaches health policy for the University of Maryland School of Social Work. Deborah Parham Hopson, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is Associate Administrator for HRSA’s HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) and is responsible for managing the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Modernization Act of 2006. The $2 bil- lion program funds medical care, treatment, referrals, and support services for uninsured and underserved people living with HIV disease as well as training for health care professionals. She directs a multi-million dollar global HIV/AIDS program with training, care, and treatment activities in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Dr. Parham Hopson served as acting asso- ciate administrator of the HIV/AIDS Bureau between January 2002 and her permanent appointment and as the bureau’s deputy associate administrator for two years prior to that. Dr. Parham Hopson holds the rank of assistant surgeon general and rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the United States Public Health Service (USPHS), entering the Corps in 1984 with HRSA’s Bureau of Community Health Services. She completed a variety of assignments in the HIV/AIDS Bureau, served as deputy chief of staff in the Office of the Surgeon General, and worked as a public health and budget analyst and chief nurse for the National Health Service Corps and other Bureau of Primary Health Care programs. Dr. Parham Hopson received her undergraduate degree in nursing and health from the University of Cincin- nati and her M.S. and Ph.D. in health policy and administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health. Michael Saag, M.D., currently serves on the International AIDS Society- USA Board of Directors, is President of the HIV Medical Association, and serves as a member of the HHS Guidelines Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy and on numerous state, local, and national committees. He has published more than 280 articles in peer-reviewed journals, including the first descrip- tion of the use of viral load in clinical practice (Science, 1993), the first description of the rapid dynamics of viral replication (Nature, 1995), the first guidelines for use of viral load in practice (Nature Medicine, 1996), the

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92 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE first proof of concept of fusion inhibition as a therapeutic option (Nature Medicine, 1998). He also directed the first in-patient studies of 7 of the 25 antiretroviral drugs currently on the market. Dr. Saag has contributed more than 50 chapters to medical textbooks, has served on the Editorial Board of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Co-Edited a textbook entitled AIDS Therapy (Churchill Livingston, now in its 3rd edition), and currently serves as an Editor of the Sanford Guide for Antimicrobial Agents and the Sanford HIV Guide. He recently served on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine (and as Chair of the Infectious Dis- ease Subspecialty Board), has twice served as a member of the HIV Disease Committee of the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program for the American College of Physicians, and has served recently on the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council. Dr. Saag received a B.S. in chemistry with honors in 1977 Tulane University and earned his medical degree from the University of Louisville. Merrill Singer, Ph.D., a medical anthropologist, is a Professor in the Depart- ment of Anthropology and a Senior Research Scientist at Center for Health, Intervention and Prevention at the University of Connecticut. Additionally, he is on the faculty of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale University. Over his career, his research and writing have focused on HIV/AIDS in highly vulnerable and disadvantaged populations, illicit drug use and drinking behavior, community and structural violence, health disparities, and the political ecology of health. His current research focuses on the nature and impact of both syndemics (interacting epidemics) and pluralea (intersecting ecocrises) on health. Additionally, he is a principal investigator on an NIMH postdoctoral fellowship training program entitled the Community-Based HIV Education Research Program for Diverse Racial & Ethnic Groups. Dr. Singer has published more than 225 articles and book chapters and has authored or edited 24 books. His newest book, with J. Bryan Page, Comprehending Drug Use: Ethnographic Research at the Social Margins, will be published by Rutgers University Press in the Fall 2010. He is a recipient of the Rudolph Virchow Prize, the George Foster Memorial Award for Practicing Anthropology, the AIDS and Anthropology Paper Prize, and the Prize for Distinguished Achievement in the Critical Study of North America. Catalina Sol, M.P.H., is the Chief Programs Officer of La Clínica del Pueblo. La Clínica del Pueblo is a nonprofit, community clinic serving uninsured persons in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area, targeting immigrant Latinos for quality health care. Ms. Sol served as La Clínica’s HIV/AIDS Department Director for 10 years prior to assuming the current position. The HIV/AIDS Department includes direct services for persons

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93 APPENDIX C living with HIV, including primary medical care, case management, mental health services, interpreters services, and support groups. In addition, La Clínica provides a range of peer-based prevention services, including HIV counseling and testing, and comprehensive HIV prevention interventions for at-risk Latino groups. Ms. Sol has worked for the past 18 years in health care settings serving immigrant, uninsured Latinos in the Washington metropolitan area. She holds a master’s degree in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University and is from El Salvador. Evelyn Tomaszewski, M.S.W., is Senior Policy Advisor within the Human Rights and International Affairs Division, National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Ms. Tomaszewski serves as Project Director for the NASW HIV/AIDS Spectrum: Mental Health Training and Education of Social Workers Project, which addresses a range of health and behavioral health issues with a focus on HIV/AIDS and co-occurring chronic illnesses. In this role, she is responsible for a multi-phase, federally funded project that provides training, education, and technical assistance to social workers and allied health and mental health care providers. Ms. Tomaszewski staffs two NASW leadership committees: the National Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues and the International Committee. She promotes NASW Global HIV/AIDS Initiative through collaboration with domestic and international groups and agencies, most recently com- pleting a capacity and training needs assessment addressing the social work workforce, volunteers, and psycho-social care providers in collaboration with FHI–Ethiopia and Physicians for Peace. Previously within NASW, Ms. Tomaszewski served as Senior Policy Associate with oversight responsibility for NASW’s work with JCAHO, revising Social Work Standards for Health Care Practice, and providing research and practice content for the NASW Center for Workforce Studies. Ms. Tomaszewski holds a B.S.W. and M.S.W. from West Virginia University and a Graduate Certificate in Procurement and Contracts Management and a Certificate in Leadership Development from the University of Virginia. Andrea Weddle, M.S.W., has been the Executive Director of the HIV Medi- cine Association (HIVMA), an organization representing frontline HIV medical providers and researchers, since September 2008. Previously, she served as the Associate Director of the association for 6 years. She devotes much of her time to advancing HIVMA’s public policy and advocacy priori- ties, which include improving access to health care for people with HIV/ AIDS, addressing HIV medical workforce issues, and promoting public policies grounded in science. Prior to joining HIVMA, she conducted policy research on Medicaid managed care programs as a research associate for the Center for HIV Quality Care and served as the staff director for the

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94 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Ms. Weddle has worked in the health policy field for more than 10 years and has a master’s degree in Social Wel- fare from the University of California, Berkeley. Becky L. White, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) and currently serves as the Co-Director of HIV services for the North Carolina Department of Correction’s (NCDOC) State Prison system. Dr. White received her under- graduate and medical degrees at the University of Virginia. She completed her internal medicine residency and chief medical residency at the Medical College of Virginia. She joined the UNC faculty to lead the HIV clinical program in the State prison system after completing her subspecialty train- ing in infectious disease. At UNC, Dr. White was one of the three founding members of the UNC Center for AIDS Research Criminal Justice Working Group, a research group focused on HIV and incarceration. Dr. White led one of the first studies empirically describing the association between the release of HIV-infected prisoners and the deleterious effect (increase) on their post-release viral loads. Furthermore, she helped to conduct the first ever randomized controlled trial of directly observed antiretroviral therapy vs. self-administered antiretroviral therapy in a state prison system. She also has participated in the implementation of HIV-opt out screening in the North Carolina state prison system and HIV-prevention interventions in incarcerated settings. She is now expanding her research focus on the HIV at-risk community.