Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Loida Bonney, M.P.H., M.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of General Medicine in the School of Medicine at Emory University with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Behavioral Sciences Health Education at Rollins School of Public Health. She received her doctorate at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Masters of Public Health at Columbia University, and clinical training in Combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Brown University’s major teaching hospitals—Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children’s Hospital. Later, she completed a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in the Division of Immunology at Miriam Hospital, Brown Medical School, funded by Institutional Training grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Infectious Consequences of Substance Abuse” (5T32DA13911) and spent one year learning HIV medicine among the first cohort of physicians to complete HIVMAs Minority Clinical Fellowship. Dr. Bonney enjoys caring for women with HIV/AIDS at Grady Memorial Hospital’s Infectious Disease Program in addition to resident primary care clinic precepting, inpatient ward, and research responsibilities. Her overarching research interest is in understanding more about HIV and STI risk in an effort to decrease racial and ethnic health disparities in this field.


Stephen L. Boswell, M.D., is President and CEO of Fenway Health in Boston, Massachusetts, and the former head of HIV Clinical Services at Massachusetts General Hospital. Fenway Health is a Community Health Center that has expertise in serving the LGBT community and those with HIV/AIDS as well as the Fenway and South End neighborhoods of Boston. Its 300 employees serve approximately 16,000 patients—1600 have



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Loida Bonney, M.P.H., M.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of General Medicine in the School of Medicine at Emory University with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Behavioral Sciences Health Education at Rollins School of Public Health. She received her doctorate at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Masters of Public Health at Columbia University, and clinical training in Combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Brown University’s major teaching hospitals—Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children’s Hospital. Later, she completed a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in the Division of Immunology at Miriam Hospital, Brown Medical School, funded by Institutional Training grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Infectious Consequences of Substance Abuse” (5T32DA13911) and spent one year learning HIV medicine among the first cohort of physicians to complete HIVMAs Minority Clinical Fellow- ship. Dr. Bonney enjoys caring for women with HIV/AIDS at Grady Memo- rial Hospital’s Infectious Disease Program in addition to resident primary care clinic precepting, inpatient ward, and research responsibilities. Her overarching research interest is in understanding more about HIV and STI risk in an effort to decrease racial and ethnic health disparities in this field. Stephen L. Boswell, M.D., is President and CEO of Fenway Health in Boston, Massachusetts, and the former head of HIV Clinical Services at Massachusetts General Hospital. Fenway Health is a Community Health Center that has expertise in serving the LGBT community and those with HIV/AIDS as well as the Fenway and South End neighborhoods of Bos- ton. Its 300 employees serve approximately 16,000 patients—1600 have 81

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82 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE HIV/AIDS. Fenway Health is actively engaged in HIV prevention and epidemiologic research. He is a general internist, administrator, and clini- cal researcher, who maintains a clinical practice with an emphasis in HIV medicine. He was a Kaiser Scholar in Health Policy and Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he studied methods to improve the safety of the blood supply during the early years of the HIV/ AIDS epidemic. Dr. Boswell is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Har- vard Medical School and holds joint appointments in the General Medicine Unit and Infectious Diseases Unit of Massachusetts General Hospital. He serves as the Principal Investigator for the CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS), a project that uses a cross-site clinical database to assist with answering complex HIV clinical research questions. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital Physician Organization. He was a member of President Clinton’s Advisory Committee on HIV/AIDS. Laura Cheever, M.D., is Deputy Associate Administrator and the Chief Medical Officer of the HIV/AIDS Bureau at the Health Resources and Ser- vices Administration (HRSA) where she provides leadership and technical expertise in the administration of the Ryan White program and in HRSA’s global HIV/AIDS program. She is a member of the Department of Health and Human Services Adult and Adolescent Antiretroviral Treatment Panel. Dr. Cheever has worked to increase retention in care and expand the hepati- tis, prevention, and substance abuse services in Ryan White programs. Prior to joining HRSA, Dr. Cheever worked to provide HIV expert care across Maryland and was medical director of both a women’s methadone program and a peer-based adherence program at Johns Hopkins University. She continues to provide ongoing medical care for HIV-infected patients. She is board certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease and trained at Johns Hopkins University, the University of California, San Francisco, and Brown University. I. Jean Davis, Ph.D., P.A., D.C., M.S., received a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychobiology prior to pursing a professional career as a physician assistant (PA). She was one the first 300 PAs to be licensed to practice medicine in the State of California. Dr. Davis continued her education and received a Bachelor of Science degree in human anatomy and a doctorate in chiropractic medicine. She was the first person in California to have dual licensing as a chiropractor and a PA. Dr. Davis returned to school and completed a Ph.D. in preventive medicine. She has recently completed a Master of Science degree in clinical research. She has been a faculty member in chiropractic colleges, physician assistant programs, and medical

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83 APPENDIX B schools. Dr. Davis is presently Associate Professor at Charles Drew Uni- versity of Medicine and Science and Assistant Professor at UCLA, Depart- ment of General Internal Medicine. She has been a faculty member of the AIDS Education and Training Centers since the early 1990s. Dr. Davis has been the PI/Co-PI of multiple HIV/AIDS related grants including National Minority AIDS Education and Training Center, Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center, Minority AIDS Initiative, and Targeted Provider Education Demonstration Program. She has been an HIV/AIDS clinician for more than 10 years and very instrumental in assisting CBOs develop and implement policies and procedures for the Opt-Out Law in California. Dr. Davis is a member of the National Medical Association, Charles R. Drew Medical Society, American Academy of Physician Assistants, California Academy of Physician Assistants, American Academy of HIV Medicine, and the Inter- national Association of Physicians in AIDS Care. Joel E. Gallant, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and Professor of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service. He has conducted dozens of clinical trials on the treatment of HIV infection. He is also an investigator in the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), the Multicenter AIDS Cohort (MACS), and the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). Within the HPTN and ACTG, he has been involved in international clinical trials, especially in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Dr. Gallant received his M.D. at the University of California, San Francisco. He completed a residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Yale- New Haven Hospital. He received his M.P.H. at the Johns Hopkins Uni- versity School of Hygiene and Public Health and completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a fellow in the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American College of Physicians and is an HIV expert in the American Academy of HIV Medicine. He is on the Governing Council for the International AIDS Society and is on the Board of Directors of the HIV Medical Association and the International AIDS Society-USA. He is a member of the DHHS Panel for Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents and the IDSA/HIVMA Panel for Primary Care Guidelines for the Management of Persons Infected with HIV. He is the editor-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins HIV Guide, a web-based educational tool, where he conducts interactive question and answer forums on HIV disease for patients and clinicians. Kathryn Hafford, R.N., M.S., is the Director of the Division of Disease Prevention in the Virginia Department of Health, where she is responsible for the state’s HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, viral

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84 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE hepatitis, and newcomer/refugee health programs. She received her Bach- elor of Science in nursing from Duke University and her Master of Science in nursing from Virginia Commonwealth University. Ms. Hafford began her career as a mental health nurse and then moved to the public health field, where she has worked for more than 30 years. She has been working in HIV since the mid-1980s. Ms. Hafford is currently the Vice Chair for the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. Brian Hujdich is the Executive Director of HealthHIV, one of the nation’s largest HIV nonprofit organizations. HealthHIV manages numerous proj- ects to reach health care professionals providing HIV primary care to minority communities, primarily in the community health center setting. Mr. Hujdich is a senior executive with more than 25 years experience in health care association management, medical advertising, public rela- tions, and medical education—focused primarily in HIV and virology. Most recently, he was the Deputy Executive Director of the American Academy of HIV Medicine, where he also served as the Director of Professional Devel- opment and Credentialing. His responsibilities included coordination of all medical education activities. He also worked with a number of government agencies and association partners on HIV-related programs, including HIV testing initiatives. Prior to that, Mr. Hujdich was Director of Education at the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care. Previously, he worked for Medicus (Publicis) as a Vice President, Account Director supervising consumer and professional advertising and medical education for numerous HIV treatments and diagnostics. He also has worked in the health care practice at several major public relations firms, including Ketchum, Hill & Knowlton and Burson-Marsteller. Since 1989, he has managed numerous antiretroviral introductions and worked with a variety of HIV/AIDS service organizations, community-based organizations, and other nonprofit organizations. Steven Johnson, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infec- tious Diseases at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. After completing medical school at Northwestern University in 1984, Dr. Johnson completed the internal medicine residency at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Aurora, Colorado, and the Infectious Diseases Fellowship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He was a staff phy- sician in Infectious Diseases at Walter Reed from 1990-1994 and became Director of the Infectious Disease Group Practice and its HIV/AIDS Clini- cal Program at the University of Colorado in September 1994. The HIV/ AIDS Program currently manages 1,500 patients in Denver and an addi- tional 400 patients in collaborative clinics in Aurora, Denver, Durango, Grand Junction, and Pueblo. Dr. Johnson is also the Medical Director

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85 APPENDIX B of the Mountain-Plains AIDS Education and Training Center and a co- investigator in the Colorado AIDS Clinical Trial Unit. He is a Fellow in the IDSA, a Fellow in the American College of Physicians, and a member of the HIV Medical Association, the American Academy of HIV Medicine, and the International AIDS Society. Mari M. Kitahata, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Director of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Services Research at the Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), and Prin- cipal Investigator of the University of Washington (UW) HIV Cohort. She has provided care and training in the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals for two decades and mentors investigators in HIV research in the UW Division of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Kitahata studies the outcomes of care for persons with HIV infection and her research has elucidated key determinants of increased survival including care managed by physicians with HIV expertise and earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment. The need for observational research to complement the invaluable information provided by randomized controlled trials has grown tremendously, which is why she established the CFAR Clinical Epidemiology and Health Services Research program at UW in 1995 and was among the first CFARs in the country to do so. Dr. Kitahata directs the Data Management Centers for the NIAID-funded CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) research platform of real-time EHR data for 22,000 patients from 8 CFARs across the United States, and the International Epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS project’s North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) that merges data on 110,000 HIV-infected individuals in care at 60 sites across the United States and Canada. Dr. Kitahata serves on the Board of Directors for the IDSA HIV Medicine Association, the USPHS/IDSA Guidelines Committee for Preven- tion of Opportunistic Infections, the ART Cohort Collaboration Steering Committee based in Europe, and the International Training and Education Center on HIV (I-TECH) where she developed a national EHR system for the Haitian Ministry of Health. Dr. Kitahata received her B.S. from Yale University, her M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, her internal medicine residency training at the University of California, San Francisco, and her M.P.H. and Fellowship training at the University of Washington, where she was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar. Jeffrey Levi, Ph.D., is Executive Director of the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), where he leads the organization’s advocacy efforts on behalf of a modernized public health system. He oversees TFAH’s work on a range of public health policy issues, including implementation of the public health provisions of the Affordable Care Act and annual reports assessing the

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86 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE nation’s public health preparedness, investment in public health infrastruc- ture, and response to chronic diseases such as obesity. Dr. Levi is also Professor of Health Policy at George Washington University’s School of Public Health, where his research has focused on HIV/AIDS, Medicaid, and integrating public health with the health care delivery system. He is a mem- ber of the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities. He has also served as an associate editor of the American Journal of Public Health, Deputy Director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and in various execu- tive capacities at the AIDS Action Council, the AIDS Action Foundation, and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. He served as a consultant to the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Public Financing and Delivery of HIV Care in the U.S., as well to its Committee on HIV Prevention Strate- gies in the United States. He also serves as faculty for the National Breast Cancer Coalition’s Project Quality LEAD, a training course designed to help breast cancer activists influence quality care in their communities and public policy processes. Dr. Levi received his B.A. from Oberlin College, M.A. from Cornell University, and Ph.D. from The George Washington University. Michael Saag, M.D., currently serves on the International AIDS Society- USA Board of Directors, as President of the HIV Medical Association, as a member of the HHS Guidelines Panel on Antiretroviral Therapy, and on numerous state, local, and national committees. He has published more than 280 articles in peer-reviewed journals, including the first descrip- tion of the use of viral load in clinical practice (Science, 1993), the first description of the rapid dynamics of viral replication (Nature, 1995), the first guidelines for use of viral load in practice (Nature Medicine, 1996), and the first proof of concept of fusion inhibition as a therapeutic option (Nature Medicine, 1998), and directed the first-in-patient studies of 7 of the 25 antiretroviral drugs currently on the market. Dr. Saag has contributed more than 50 chapters to medical textbooks, has served on the Editorial Board of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, co-edited a textbook entitled AIDS Therapy (Churchill Livingston, now in its 3rd edition), and currently serves as an dditor of the Sanford Guide for Antimicrobial Agents and the Sanford HIV Guide. He recently served on the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine (and as Chair of the Infectious Disease Subspecialty Board), has twice served as a member of the HIV Dis- ease Committee of the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program for the American College of Physicians, and has served recently on the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council. Dr. Saag received a B.S. in chemistry

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87 APPENDIX B with honors from Tulane University in 1977 and earned his medical degree from the University of Louisville. Julie Scofield joined the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) as their first Executive Director in February 1993. Under Ms. Scofield’s leadership, NASTAD has grown from a staff of one, to a highly respected national HIV/AIDS organization of more than 30 FTEs and major programs in the areas of HIV prevention, care and treatment, racial and ethnic health disparities, viral hepatitis, government relations, and global HIV/AIDS technical assistance. Prior to opening NASTAD’s national office, Ms. Scofield served as legislative assistant in the State of New York Office of Federal Affairs. Ms. Scofield represented the state on science and technology and health issues including HIV/AIDS policy and funding before Congress and the Administration from 1987 to 1993. She served on the legislative staff of former U.S. Representative Stan Lundine from 1981 to 1987. Ms. Scofield is a graduate of Buffalo State College. Kimberly Y. Smith, M.D., M.P.H., is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Section of Infectious Diseases at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. She also serves as an attending physician at Stroger (for- merly Cook County) Hospital and the CORE Center in Chicago. Dr. Smith received her M.D. and M.P.H. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Dr. Smith’s major areas of interest include immune based therapies for HIV disease and issues related to African-Americans and HIV disease. Dr. Smith is an active investigator and chair of several studies in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) and was awarded the John T. Carey Young Investigator Award of the ACTG in 2002. She currently serves as Chair of the ACTG Underrepresented Populations Committee and as a member of the ACTG Executive Committee. She previously served on the board of the HIV Medical Association. She has published more than 50 abstracts and manuscripts, and her expert opinion has been featured in numerous maga- zines and newspapers including the New York Times. Dr. Smith has lectured at countless local, national, and international conferences, including the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, the International AIDS Conference, the International Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Infectious Disease Society of America, the National Medical Association Conference, and the NAACP National Conference. Adele Webb, Ph.D., R.N., CPNP, ACRN, FAAN, is Executive Director/CEO of Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Dr. Webb has been an HIV nurse since 1989. She has experience not only as a pediatric nurse practitioner, but also as a graduate faculty member at the University of Akron. Dr. Webb

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88 HIV SCREENING AND ACCESS TO CARE has had extensive grant funding the area of HIV and stigma. Her research and clinical practice span many countries including Botswana, Zimba- bwe, Zambia, Lesotho, Swaziland, South Africa, and India. Dr. Webb is well published in the area of HIV. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Fellow, a Fellow in the International Council of Nurses Global Nursing Leadership Institute, a Distinguished Practitioner in the National Academies of Practice, and a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing. In 2010, Dr. Webb received the prestigious Nicholas Andrew Cummings Award for extraordinary contributions to interprofessional health care. Andrea Weddle, M.S.W., has been Executive Director of the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA), an organization representing frontline HIV medical providers and researchers, since September 2008. Previously she served as Associate Director of the association for 6 years. She devotes much of her time to advancing HIVMA’s public policy and advocacy priorities, which include improving access to health care for people with HIV/AIDS; address- ing HIV medical workforce issues, and promoting public policies grounded in science. Prior to joining HIVMA, she conducted policy research on Medicaid managed care programs as a research associate for the Center for HIV Quality Care and served as the staff director for the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Ms. Weddle has worked in the health policy field for more than 10 years and received her M.S.W. from the University of California, Berkeley. Andrew Young, M.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the Emory Uni- versity School of Medicine and Director of Clinical Laboratories at Grady Memorial Hospital. As laboratory director, Dr. Young oversees one of the largest hospital laboratories in the country, performing 1.2 million billable tests per month in disciplines that include chemistry, toxicology, hematol- ogy, coagulation, microbiology, immunology, molecular diagnostics, and transfusion medicine. Grady Health System is the public safety net hospital for the Atlanta area and is the regional center for HIV care, trauma, and sickle cell disease. Inpatient services at Grady Memorial Hospital care for an ethnically diverse population with very high HIV prevalence, and Grady’s Infectious Disease Program (IDP) is one of the largest, most com- prehensive facilities dedicated to the treatment of advanced HIV/AIDS in the United States. Dr. Young is an author of more than 50 peer-reviewed publications. In 2010, he received the Benjamin Castleman Award for an outstanding paper in the field of human pathology.