Appendix B
Biosketches of Workshop Speakers

Mark Benthien is the director for Communication, Education and Outreach for the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), headquartered at the University of Southern California (USC). Mr. Benthien received a Bachelor of Science degree in geophysics from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1995 and a Master of Public Policy degree from USC in 2003. He communicates earthquake knowledge to end users and the general public in order to increase earthquake awareness, reduce economic losses, and save lives. Components of his work include the following: (1) coordinating productive interactions among SCEC scientists and with partners in science, engineering, risk management, government, business, and education; (2) managing activities that increase earthquake knowledge and science literacy at all educational levels; (3) leading efforts to improve earthquake hazard and risk assessments; and (4) promoting earthquake preparedness, mitigation, and planning for response and recovery. Many of these efforts are in coordination with members of the Earthquake Country Alliance, a private-public partnership of organizations that provide earthquake information and services, for which Mr. Benthien serves as the executive director. In this role he is the lead organizer of the Great California ShakeOut, a new annual earthquake drill with millions of participants throughout the state.


David G. Boyd is the director of the Command, Control and Interoperability Division at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and is responsible for research and development (R&D) programs that support



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Appendix B Biosketches of Workshop Speakers Mark benthien is the director for Communication, Education and Out­ reach for the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), head­ quartered at the University of Southern California (USC). Mr. Benthien received a Bachelor of Science degree in geophysics from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1995 and a Master of Public Policy degree from USC in 2003. He communicates earthquake knowledge to end users and the general public in order to increase earthquake awareness, reduce economic losses, and save lives. Components of his work include the fol ­ lowing: (1) coordinating productive interactions among SCEC scientists and with partners in science, engineering, risk management, government, business, and education; (2) managing activities that increase earthquake knowledge and science literacy at all educational levels; (3) leading efforts to improve earthquake hazard and risk assessments; and (4) promot­ ing earthquake preparedness, mitigation, and planning for response and recovery. Many of these efforts are in coordination with members of the Earthquake Country Alliance, a private­public partnership of orga­ nizations that provide earthquake information and services, for which Mr. Benthien serves as the executive director. In this role he is the lead organizer of the Great California ShakeOut, a new annual earthquake drill with millions of participants throughout the state. David g. boyd is the director of the Command, Control and Interoper­ ability Division at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and is responsible for research and development (R&D) programs that support 

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0 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES command and control, communications, computing, intelligence, surveil­ lance, reconnaissance, cybersecurity, and interoperability. Before joining DHS, Dr. Boyd served as the director of science and technology for the National Institute of Justice, where he managed R&D programs in every facet of technology affecting law enforcement and corrections, including the forensic sciences, less­than­lethal technologies, information and com­ munications technologies, and concealed weapons and contraband detec­ tion, among others. Dr. Boyd is a retired U.S. Army Officer and a recipient of the 2005 Presidential Rank Award, the highest recognition available in the Federal Civil Service. With graduate degrees in management and public policy analysis as well as a doctorate in decision sciences, he has also published extensively in military, law enforcement, technical, and general­circulation publications. garry L. briese is a co­founder of the Center for New Media and Resil­ iency and a principal in the professional services and consulting company Briese and Associates. In April 2008, he was appointed by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) regional administrator for DHS/FEMA Region 8, for Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Mr. Briese served until January 2009 in this position, as the senior DHS/FEMA official in the region. During that time, the 2008 Democratic National Convention was held in Denver, Colorado, and FEMA Region 8 was the lead agency for federal consequence management response preparations and response. Prior to coming to DHS/FEMA, he served as vice president, Emergency Management and Homeland Security, for ICF International, a NASDAQ­listed professional services corporation based in Fairfax County, Virginia. Mr. Briese served as the executive director of the 12,000 member International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) from 1985 to 2007. Previously he had served as the execu ­ tive director of the Florida College of Emergency Physicians, and he has more than 36 years’ experience in all levels of emergency services, includ­ ing local, state, national, and international. He is a well­known author and lecturer on leadership and on the future challenges for the fire and emergency services community and has coauthored two first­responder emergency medical textbooks as well as an innovative textbook for the basic training of firefighters. He developed several innovative programs such as the Fire Service Leadership Partnership Program, an internation ­ ally recognized labor­management relations program, and the National Fire Service Near Miss Reporting System. Mr. Briese has served as a career and volunteer firefighter as well as the publicly elected chair of the Board of Fire Commissioners of a fire protection district in Orange County, Florida. He is a member of the advisory committee to the Board of the

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 APPENDIX B National Fallen Firefighters Foundation and is a member of the board of directors of the IAFC Foundation. Mr. Briese received his B.A. in inter­ national relations from the University of South Florida and his master’s degree in public administration from Nova Southeastern University. He is an adjunct faculty member in the Center for Trauma at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. barbara Childs-Pair is the former director of the District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency and the home­ land security adviser for the National Capital Region. In that role, she developed play books and protective action guides for the mayor of the District of Columbia, cabinet officials, and elected officials. She also assisted with the development of the first­hour checklist and play books for the National Capital Regional after September 11. Ms. Childs­Pair had extensive experience with briefing mayors, governors, and White House officials during her more­than­30­year career with the District of Columbia. Darrell Darnell is the director, Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resil­ ience Policy, National Security Staff in the newly created White House Office on Resilience. He assumed this position on October 26, 2009. Prior to joining the National Security Staff, Mr. Darnell was the director of the District of Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, from March 2007 to October 2009. As director, he led the devel­ opment of an overall public safety strategy to ensure the readiness and operational capability of the District of Columbia to prevent, or respond to and recover from, natural hazards, intentional acts of destruction, or accidental emergencies. He established a Homeland Security Program for the District of Columbia and directed the planning and interagency coor­ dination of District of Columbia support to special events and National Security Special Events such as the visit of Pope Benedict xVI to the United States and the inauguration of President Obama. Mr. Darnell served as the director, Preparedness Division, Department of Homeland Security Headquarters Operational Integration Staff (I­Staff), where he oversaw DHS and interagency operational planning and the execution of national exercise, evaluation, and preparedness assessment programs. Prior to his assignment to the I­Staff, Mr. Darnell served as the director of the Local Programs Division within the State and Local Program Manage­ ment Division at Office of State and Local Government Coordination and Preparedness where he oversaw the development and implementation of antiterrorism and counterterrorism preparedness programs for the Urban Areas Security Initiative. Mr. Darnell was a special assistant to the direc ­ tor of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS), and

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 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES he assisted the Office of the Director in the administration and manage ­ ment of the COPS Office, as well as serving as a liaison for the director to state and local law enforcement officials. Mr. Darnell has served as an adjunct professor at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland and at the University of Maryland, University College­Asian Division. He served honorably as a member of the United States Air Force, retiring in November 1997. Mr. Darnell is a senior fellow at the George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute and the first recipient of the Founder’s Award from the Naval Postgraduate School’s Center for Homeland Defense and Security. He is a graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health and Kennedy School of Government’s National Pre­ paredness Leadership Initiative. Robert Dudgeon is a deputy director in the City of San Francisco’s Depart­ ment of Emergency Management and is responsible for the Division of Emergency Services. The division is responsible for coordinating the city’s multidisciplinary response to emergencies, developing emergency plans, managing the city’s exercise program and public preparedness programs. The Emergency Medical Services Agency, also housed in the division, is responsible for regulatory oversight of the city’s Emergency Medical Services System and medical planning for disasters. In addition, the divi ­ sion is responsible for managing homeland security and other related preparedness grants for the city. As an adjunct assignment, Mr. Dudgeon serves as a senior adviser to Mayor Gavin Newsom on matters of disaster preparedness and emergency management. Mr. Dudgeon holds a B.A. in management and has more than 20 years of experience ranging from first responder/paramedic to managing the San Francisco’s emergency operations center. Denis gusty serves as the Program Manager, First Responder Group, Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Secu ­ rity. In addition, he leads the data interoperability programs of the Office of Interoperability and Compatability, which aim to improve incident response and recovery by developing tools that include the Federal Emer­ gency Management Agency (FEMA) Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) and the Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS) and the EDxL messaging standards that help emergency responders man­ age incidents and exchange information in real time. Mr. Gusty came to Command, Control, and Interoperability from the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), where he served as director of GSA’s Office of Intergovernmental Solutions. Prior to joining GSA, Mr. Gusty served as a program manager at the U.S. Department of Labor. In that role, he was responsible for helping to implement the President’s Management Agenda

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 APPENDIX B by managing the e­Government initiative, GovBenefits.gov. Mr. Gusty has more than 7 years of experience in developing intergovernmental partner­ ships and information technology policy and practices. brett Hansard is the manager of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Risk Communication and Management program, which provides public affairs training, product development, and exercise support to govern­ ment, nonprofit, private­sector, and international organizations of all types. He has been with ANL since 1999. He has a deep and varied back ­ ground in emergency public information, having served as spokesperson on stories of local, national, and international significance. As a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) public affairs officer, he has worked on more than 24 presidentially declared disasters, including the floods in the Midwest in 1993; the Northridge earthquake in California in 1994; the flood in Grand Forks, North Dakota, in 1997; Hurricane Floyd in 1999; the Colorado wildfires in 2002; and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In September 2001, Mr. Hansard served as lead public affairs officer in sup­ port of FEMA Urban Search and Rescue efforts at the World Trade Center. In February 2002, he helped coordinate FEMA external affairs operations at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, Utah, and in August 2008 he oversaw the FEMA media monitoring and analysis program at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Mr. Hansard has performed a variety of roles within a Joint Information System/Joint Information Center, including serving as external affairs lead and public affairs lead, performing research and writing, and working on the news desk and on rapid response. He is also a certified fire information officer. Previously Mr. Hansard served as press secretary and research assistant for the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee and as a staff member for U.S. Senator Alan Cranston. He has worked as campaign coordinator and spokesperson for a California State Senate campaign in Los Angeles. He has written numerous articles, speeches, and op­ed articles for political candidates, senior public officials, and chief executive officers. He has an M.P.P. from the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government and a B.A. in journalism from California State University, Northridge. Judy Harkins is a professor in Gallaudet University’s Department of Communication Studies. She is the founding director of the Technol­ ogy Access Program at the university and a principal investigator of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Telecommunications Access in cooperation with the Trace Center, University of Wisconsin. Her research bears both directly and indirectly on the accessibility of emergency communications to people with disabilities. At Gallaudet she has developed a course on communication accessibility for deaf under­

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 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES graduates. Dr. Harkins served in an advisory capacity to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the User Needs Group of the Commercial Mobile Service Alert Advisory Committee (CMSAAC), as an alternate on Network Reliability and Interoperability Council VII, and on two other FCC Federal Advisory Committees related to consumer issues and telecommunications accessibility. She comments frequently in FCC proceedings concerning public safety and people with disabilities, and she has participated actively in industry forums established within the Alliance for Telecommunication Industry Solutions to produce solu ­ tions to accessibility problems. In 2009­2010, she was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award of Telecommunications for the Deaf, Inc., the Chairman’s award of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engi­ neers/Communications Quality and Reliability Technical Committee, the Susan B. Hadden award for pioneering work in telecommunications by the Alliance for Public Technology, and a certificate of appreciation for contributions to the accessibility committee of the National Emergency Number Association. Michael Lindell is the director of the Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center at Texas A&M University. He has a graduate degree in social psychology from the University of Colorado (1975), with a specialty in disaster research, and has completed hazardous materials emergency responder training through the Hazardous Materials Specialist level. Dr. Lindell has more than 25 years of experience in the field of emergency management, during which time he has conducted a program of research on the processes by which individuals and organizations respond to natu­ ral and technological hazards. In addition, he has had extensive experi ­ ence in providing technical assistance to government agencies, industry groups, and private corporations in the development of emergency plans and procedures. Dr. Lindell has written extensively on emergency man­ agement and is the author of more than 60 technical reports, 60 journal articles and book chapters, and 5 books and monographs. Much of his research, especially that supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), has examined the processes by which affected populations respond to warnings of the imminent threat of a natural or technological hazard. His organizational research, also supported by NSF, has looked at the effects of disaster experience and the community planning process on the development of adaptive strategies for promoting emergency pre ­ paredness. Dr. Lindell has served as an adjunct faculty member for the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Emergency Training Center, lecturing on disaster psychology and public response to warning. He also has been an instructor in other workshops that federal agencies have sponsored for state and local emergency planners throughout the

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 APPENDIX B country, and he has appeared as a panelist in conferences on protective actions in hazardous materials emergencies. In addition, he has been a consultant to five of the Department of Energy national laboratories on a variety of topics in the area of emergency preparedness and response. Christopher b. Mayhorn, an associate professor and program coordinator of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Psychology program, joined the faculty at North Carolina State University in 2002. He earned a B.A. from the Citadel (1992) and an M.S. (1995), a graduate certificate in gerontology (1995), and a Ph.D. (1999) from the University of Georgia. He also com­ pleted a postdoctoral fellowship at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His teaching duties include courses in research methodology, human factors, and cognition. Dr. Mayhorn’s current research interests include everyday memory, decision making, human­computer interaction, and safety and risk communication, as well as the design of home medical devices for older adult populations. Dr. Mayhorn has more than 30 peer­ reviewed publications, and his research has been funded by government agencies such as the National Science Foundation. Currently, Dr. Mayhorn is serving on the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) Govern­ ment Relations Committee and as the president of the Carolina Chapter of HFES. Michael Mulhare was appointed director of emergency management at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in November 2008. The university’s Office of Emergency Management is a new office, reporting to the vice president of administrative services, which oversees emergency planning and preparedness and response. Mr. Mulhare is responsible for developing and maintaining a compre ­ hensive and integrated emergency management program utilizing an all­hazard approach to the coordination and management of risk assess­ ment, emergency management, disaster planning, and continuity of oper­ ations planning and response activities. He had previously, since 1985, served the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management in a variety of capacities: from 2001 to 2008 as the department’s emergency response administrator in the Office of the Director, and in 2006 he took on the added duties of chief of the new Office of Emergency Response. Mr. Mulhare is a registered professional engineer, with more than 25 years of practical experience as an emergency manager, first responder, and scientist and engineer. Inés Pearce is the chief executive of Pearce Global Partners, Inc. (PGP), addressing the needs of government, business, nonprofit organizations, and communities to reduce the potential for loss of life and property from

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 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES natural and human­caused disasters. Ms. Pearce is a business continuity and emergency management expert with 17 years of professional experi ­ ence, including 12 years specializing in public­private partnerships. She serves as the senior adviser for the Business Civic Leadership Center (BCLC) of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, where she is the BCLC’s pri ­ mary point of contact for community­level disaster preparedness, recov­ ery, and partnership coordination. She has also serves as the BCLC’s liaison during disasters, for the facilitation of long­term recovery, such as after the earthquakes in Chile and Haiti in 2010, the American Samoa tsunami in 2009, and, in 2008 the flooding in Iowa, storms in Florida, and hurricanes in Texas and Louisiana. In 2009, Ms. Pearce was selected to the National Research Council’s Committee on Private­Public Sector Collaboration to Enhance Community Disaster Resilience. Before launch ­ ing PGP, Ms. Pearce was appointed director of Seattle Project Impact for the City of Seattle Office of Emergency Management, managing four mitigation programs that provided resources for safer schools, homes, and businesses, as well as better hazard maps. During her tenure, Seattle Project Impact received numerous national excellence awards. As an expert in public­private partnerships, Ms. Pearce has represented the World Economic Forum at the United Nations’ (UN) Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction in Geneva, Switzerland, and has addressed the UN regarding public­private partnerships at the World Conference for Disaster Reduction in Kobe, Japan. In 2003, Ms. Pearce was inducted into the Contingency Planning and Management (CPM) Hall of Fame in the Public Servant category. She has also received two National Excellence Awards from the Western States Seismic Policy Council; in 2009, she received an Award of Recognition from the City of Los Angeles for the successful planning of the Great Southern California ShakeOut, the largest earthquake drill in U.S. history, with 5.5 million participants, surpassed in 2009 with 6.9 million registrants statewide; and in 2010, she received the U.S. Geological Survey’s Shoemaker Award for Communications Excel­ lence. Ms. Pearce is the president of the Disaster Resistant Business Toolkit (DRB Toolkit®) Workgroup, a 501c­3 public charity that provides a com­ prehensive software tool facilitating the process for small businesses and nonprofit organizations to create and then implement improved disaster readiness plans; the president of the Contingency Planning and Recovery Management group; and a member of the board of the Cascadia Regional Earthquake Workgroup. She received her B.A. degree in political science from Gonzaga University. brenda Phillips teaches emergency management and research methods courses, with particular expertise in disaster recovery and high­risk popu­

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 APPENDIX B lations at Oklahoma State University. She is a researcher with the Center for the Study of Disasters and Extreme Events and a faculty member in the Fire and Emergency Management Program. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Natural Hazards Center. She taught in Costa Rica through a Rotary Foundation International Grant, received a Fulbright­Hays Award to Pakistan, and participated in a National Science Foundation Researcher Exchange with the People’s Republic of China. She has given invited pre­ sentations in New Zealand, Australia, Germany, Costa Rica, and India, and at the U.S. National Academies, Church World Services, the National Weather Service Training Center, and various state offices of emergency management. Her work has been published in the Journal of Emergency Management, Disaster Management, Disasters, International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, Sociological Focus, and Humanity and Society. Jennifer Preece is a professor in and dean of the College of Informa­ tion Studies—Maryland’s iSchool—at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on the intersection of information, community, and tech ­ nology. She is particularly interested in community participation on­ and off­line. Dr. Preece is the author of eight books and numerous research articles. Two of her books are Online Communities: Designing Usability, Sup- porting Sociability (Wiley, 2000) and a coauthored best­selling text entitled Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction (Wiley, 1st ed., 2002; 2nd ed., 2007; 3rd ed., 2011). Ed Price is the research director of the Interactive Media Technology Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is one of the founders of the center, starting there as a student at its inception in 1989. He has led many research efforts, including the award­winning Odyssey Online educational program, which teaches cultural history through archeological artifacts. Dr. Price holds two worldwide patents in telemedicine and has filed addi­ tional patents on audio searching and eCommerce networks. He is past chair of the international Video Development Initiative (ViDe), which is the lead organization behind the proposed International Telecommunication Union H.350 standard for videoconferencing directories. Dr. Price is also a project director in the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Mobile Wireless Technology for Persons with Disabilities, leading the development efforts in universal control and multimodal interfaces as well as research into emerging wireless technologies. He is also a primary representative to the INCITS V2 standards committee developing the Alternative Inter­ face Access Protocol, an emerging standard which will ensure that mobile devices will be able to interact with their surrounding environments.

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 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES Daryl Rand, currently with Harrison Advertising and The Rand Group, has had a 35­year career marked by long­term assignments in adver­ tising, public relations, and media management. For the past 5 years, Ms. Rand has spearheaded an initiative focused on launching public education/awareness outreach campaigns for many of the nation’s major cities, including New York and San Francisco, and the State of New Jersey. She participated in crafting the Emergency Management Accredita­ tion Program’s Guidelines for Public Awareness Programs to strengthen public education. Her focus on the need to implement sustained readi ­ ness education was instrumental in forming a coalition of the country’s top emergency managers, now known as the Top Eight. Her emergency management and homeland security perspectives have been broadened as a result of her membership in the Washington­based organization Business Executives for National Security. Ms. Rand has been a consul ­ tant to CBS Outdoor, the global leader in Out­of­Home Media, and its predecessors for the past 25 years. In that capacity, she helped negotiate the transit advertising franchise and subsequent extensions with New Jersey Transit for advertising rights on 3,000 buses managed by the only state authority operated by CBS Outdoor. Ms. Rand also supervised all statewide transit advertising operations and sales for their New Jersey market. She is the founder and president of Harrison Advertising, Inc., a Women’s Business Enterprise Corporation, fully certified by the State of New Jersey, New Jersey Transit, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the Metropolitan Transit Authority, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, and Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority. In addition, she and her father before her have served the Provident Bank as advertising and public relations counsel for five decades. Eight years ago, Ms. Rand founded the partnership of RM International with Alan Marcus to continue to serve the bank in that capacity. Matthew Seeger is currently a professor and chair in the Department of Communication at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. His teach­ ing and research are in communication ethics, crisis and emergency risk communication, organizational responses to crisis and disaster, inter­ agency coordination, and informational needs. Dr. Seeger also served as associate dean of the Graduate School at Wayne State. He has advised 35 doctoral dissertations in the areas of organizational communication, crisis communication, and related topics. He has served as a consultant to AT&T, DaimlerChrysler, Blue­Cross/Blue­Shield, General Motors, K­Mart Corporation, and the State of Michigan, among other organizations. He has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the State of Michigan on issues of crisis communication and the public health, cross­border coordination, and crisis leadership. He participated in

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 APPENDIX B the CDC’s debriefing and critique of its response to the 2001­2010 anthrax episode and in developing the CDC’s crisis communication protocols. He has worked very closely with the CDC on issues of pandemic influenza preparedness. Dr. Seeger also worked with the U.S. Department of Agri­ culture on issues of risk communication. In 2002, he participated in a U.S. Department of State grant to train Russian government officials in effective crisis communication. His work on communication risk and crisis man­ agement has appeared in the Handbook of Crisis and Risk Communication, International Encyclopedia of Communication, Journal of Health Communica - tion Research, Communication Yearbook, Handbook of Public Relations, Public Relations Review, Communication Studies, Journal of Business Communica- tion, Journal of Change Management, Management Communication Quarterly, Southern Communication Journal, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of Applied Communication Research, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Health Promotion and Practice, and Communication Research Reports and in several edited collections and proceedings. His books include Effective Cri- sis Communication (Sage, 2007); Crisis Communication and the Public Health (Hampton, 2008); Communication and Organization Crisis (Praeger, 2003); and Risk Communication: A Message Centered Approach (Science Press, forth­ coming). He also wrote Ethics in Organizational Communication (Hampton, 1998), a comprehensive treatment of ethical issues of communication faced by organizations. Dr. Seeger has received research support from CDC, the National Science Foundation, the National Center for Food Protection and Defense, and the State of Michigan. His current research interests focus on informational needs during crisis, crisis and public health, communica­ tion and natural disasters, crisis discourse, and the application of chaos theory and learning theory to crisis. He recently completed Communication, Organization and Crisis for Quorum Press and is working on a book dealing with crisis communication for Sage and editing Crisis Communication and the Public Health for Hampton Press. Timothy Sellnow is a professor of communication at the University of Kentucky where he teaches courses in research methods, organizational communication, and risk and crisis communication. Dr. Sellnow’s research focuses on bioterrorism, pre­crisis planning, and communication strate­ gies for crisis management and mitigation. He has conducted funded research for the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has published numerous articles on risk and crisis communication and has coauthored four books. His most recent book is entitled Risk Com- munication: A Message-Centered Approach (Springer, 2008). Dr. Sellnow is the former editor of the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research.

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0 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES John H. Sorensen—See biosketch in Appendix C, “Committee and Staff Biosketches.” Joseph Trainor is a research assistant professor at the Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware, with joint appointments in the Depart ­ ment of Sociology and Criminal Justice and the School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy. He is a member of the University of Delaware Research Council and an active participant in the International Research Com­ mittee on Disasters. His primary research interests include international aspects of disasters, social networks, disaster researcher and practitioner integration, warnings and protective action, human behavioral response to disasters, effects of organizational design, and patterns of association in multi­organizational networks. Dr. Trainor has significant research experi­ ence and has been involved in a number of funded research projects, both in the United States and internationally. He has authored or coauthored more than 12 articles and book chapters on disaster­related topics. He was the principal network analyst in a study of multi­organizational coordina­ tion after the World Trade Center attacks on September 11; the lead gradu­ ate researcher on a project to examine the organizational and institutional development and operation of Emergency Support FuctionESF#9/Search and Rescue in the United States; and he conducted an analysis of the perspective of FEMA employees on the impacts organizational design. In addition to more traditional quantitative and qualitative research, he also has engaged in a number of field research projects. He was a member of a research reconnaissance team that traveled to India and Sri Lanka imme­ diately following the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and later he served as the lead field researcher for the Disaster Research Center’s effort to examine the social aspects of Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Trainor has also recently been working to develop a number of disaster planning and outreach services. The goal of this effort is to provide state and local com­ munities with assistance as they engage in the disaster planning process and at the same time to provide emergency management students with real­life experience. In addition to other efforts in this area, he assisted in the development of an approach to writing Emergency Operations Plans (EOP), a planning process for small communities, and has been involved in writing a number of research summaries for state, federal, and interna­ tional governments that summarize different aspects of key social science research on disasters. Finally, Dr. Trainor has been actively participating in the establishment of the University of Delaware’s new degree program in disaster science and management. Nalini venkatasubramanian is currently a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine. She has had

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 APPENDIX B extensive research and industry experience in the areas of distributed systems, adaptive middleware, and distributed multimedia systems and mobile applications. Her experience in crisis alerting systems has been in the context of developing fast, reliable, and customized alerts to large pop­ ulations in the presence of surge demands and infrastructure failures—in particular through the RESCUE project and the CrisisAlert System. Pro­ fessor Venkatasubramanian has published more than 150 papers and is a recipient of several awards, including the NSF Career Award and Teach­ ing Excellence Awards. She has served on the program committee and organizing committee of a variety of conferences on middleware, distrib­ uted systems, and mobile applications. Dave Waldrop served as the architect of Microsoft’s Vine, a location­aware social networking application focused on keeping family and friends in contact during emergencies. Prior to joining Microsoft, he served as the vice president of Netserv as well as the vice president of sales for Centen­ nial Computer Systems. Mr. Waldrop has extensive experience in senior leadership in sales, customer and product marketing, and business devel­ opment, and a distinguished track record of driving innovation through start­up business models, establishing, negotiating, and driving large strategic partnerships, and developing and leading high­performance teams. Peter White began his professional career as an assistant district attorney in the New York County District Attorney’s Office, where he tried felony cases and later specialized in complex criminal investigations using eavesdropping and other electronic surveillance. He joined the wireless industry in 1995 as a director with AT&T Wireless Services and has held numerous legal and external affairs positions since that time. In 2003, Mr. White joined the International Division of AT&T Wireless, where he was responsible for all company relationships with governments from Bermuda, to the Cayman Islands, to Trinidad and Tobago. He returned to domestic matters in 2005, where he currently is responsible for enhanced­ 911 and other emergency communications, roaming, and related policy issues. Michele Wood received a doctorate in public health from the Depart­ ment of Community Health Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); she also holds a master’s degree in community psychol­ ogy. Dr. Wood is an assistant professor in the Health Science Department at the California State University, Fullerton, where she teaches courses in statistics and program design and evaluation. She has 20 years’ experi­ ence designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions. Through

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 PUBLIC RESPONSE TO ALERTS AND WARNINGS ON MOBILE DEVICES her affiliation with the Southern California Injury Prevention Center in the UCLA School of Public Health, she managed a national household preparedness survey, conducted as part of the National Center for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) program through START) the University of Maryland’s Center of Excellence, as well as a California household telephone survey on earthquake preparedness.