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E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Gordon H. DeFriese, Ph.D. (Chair), holds joint appointments as professor of social medicine, dental ecology, epidemiology, and health policy and ad- ministration. He is a former director of the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and the Institute on Aging at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His primary area of interest is aging, specifically the factors that motivate and enable community-dwelling older adults to learn and practice self-care skills, particularly when faced with functional limita- tions. In addition to this work, he has been engaged in a number of stud- ies of the problems associated with low levels of childhood immunization in the United States, including evaluation of the national All Kids Count registry system demonstrations funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foun- dation. Since the mid-1990s, he has focused most of his work in the area of state-level health policy, serving as president and chief executive officer of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine. This role has included spe- cial studies of long-term care, dental care for low-income persons, health insurance for low-income children, the health care safety net, the nursing workforce, and Latino health issues and will soon expand to include work on child abuse, health literacy, and the uninsured. Dr. DeFriese is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) and IOM committees. He received his Ph.D. in medical sociology from the University of Kentucky. Paula A. Braveman, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine, and director of the Center on Social Disparities in Health at the University of California, 263

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264 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH San Francisco (UCSF). Her areas of interest include documenting and understanding socioeconomic and racial or ethnic disparities in health, particularly in maternal and infant health, and translating research into in- formation to inform policies to reduce health disparities. Dr. Braveman also focuses on methodological and conceptual issues in studying socioeconomic and racial or ethnic inequalities in health in the United States and interna- tionally, particularly the development of measures of experiences of racial discrimination for use in studies of adverse birth outcomes among African American women in the United States, the measurement of socioeconomic factors in U.S. health research, and the concept and measurement of health inequalities in the United States and internationally. During the 1990s, she worked with World Health Organization staff in Geneva to develop and implement a global initiative on equity in health and health care. Through- out her career, Dr. Braveman has collaborated with local, state, federal, and international health agencies to see research translated into practice, with the goal of achieving greater equity in health. She is an elected member of the IOM. She received an M.D. from UCSF and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. Claire D. Brindis, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., is director of the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and a professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, and the Department of Obstetrics, Gyne- cology and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF. She is also executive director of the National Adolescent Health Information and Innovation Center and associate director of the Public Policy Analysis and Education Center for Middle Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Health, all at UCSF. Dr. Brindis’s research interests focus on health disparities and access to health for children, adolescents, and young adults; analyses of child and adolescent health policy; and women’s health. She serves as a frequent policy advisor to federal, state, and local policy makers and private foundations. Her writings, publications, and personal consultation in the field of adolescent pregnancy prevention have been extensively utilized in the planning and implementation of various state and federal initiatives. Dr. Brindis has served as chair of the population, reproductive health, and family planning section of the American Public Health Association and participated on the steering committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Health Objectives for the Year 2010. Currently, she serves on the Steering Committee for the National Initiative to Improve Adolescent and Young Adult Health, co-led by the federal Office of Ado- lescent Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, and the Division of Adolescent and School Health, CDC, as well as 30 national organizations. She also is a member of the national advisory committee for the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Young Adult Pregnancy’s National Advisory

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265 APPENDIX E Committee-Latino Initiative. In the area of reproductive health, Dr. Brindis has led a multidisciplinary team evaluating California’s Office of Family Planning’s Family PACT (Planning, Access, Care and Treatment) program, as well as reproductive health programs in Iowa, Colorado, and New York. In addition, she is conducting two evaluations of policy coalitions devoted to asthma and community clinics. Dr. Brindis has served on numerous IOM and NRC committees, most recently the IOM Committee on a Compre- hensive Review of the DHHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program. She received a Dr.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.P.H. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Barbara J. Burns, Ph.D., is professor of medical psychology and director of the Services Effectiveness Research Program in the Department of Psy- chiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University, School of Medicine. Dr. Burns is a nationally recognized mental health services researcher. She has coauthored more than 250 publications and was lead author for the review of effective treatment for mental disorders in children and adolescents for the 1999 U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Mental Health. Her research career emerged from clinical practice in an integrated health/mental health center and interest in exploring the implications of that model. For nearly a decade at the National Institute of Mental Health, she focused on improv- ing mental health services from primary to tertiary care. She is currently investigating the effectiveness of an enhanced model of long-term treat- ment foster care, best practices for child trauma, the effectiveness of group homes, and mental health services for children in the child welfare system. Her primary focus is on strategies to increase the diffusion of evidence- based interventions for youth with severe emotional disorders. Throughout her research, teaching, clinical practice, and policy career, Dr. Burns has studied and advocated for responsive and innovative community-based treatment. She received a Ph.D. in psychology from Boston College. Glenn Flores, M.D., is professor of pediatrics and public health, director of general pediatrics, Judith and Charles Ginsburg chair in pediatrics, and director of the Academic General Pediatrics Fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern and Children’s Medical Center Dallas. He founded and is former codirector of the Pediatric Latino Clinic at Boston Medical Center. Dr. Flores is a former Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) generalist phy- sician faculty scholar and a former RWJ minority medical faculty scholar. His research focuses on racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care, Latino children’s health, access to health care, and culture and clinical care. Dr. Flores chaired the Latino Consortium of the American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research and is a member of the Committee on Pediatric Research of the American Academy of Pediat-

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266 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH rics. He is chair of the Research Committee of the Academic Pediatric Association and is also a member of the National Advisory Committee of the RWJ Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program. He received an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. Gary L. Freed, M.D., is Percy and Mary Murphy professor of pediatrics and community health in the Department of Pediatrics at University of Michi- gan Health Systems. He has more than 18 years of experience in children’s health services research and has published extensively on child health policy and health economics, physician behavior, and interspecialty variation in the provision of preventive services to children. Dr. Freed is immediate past president of the Society for Pediatric Research and immediate past chair of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) National Vaccine Advisory Committee. He is a member of the American Board of Pediatrics and a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He received an M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. Deborah A. Gross, R.N., D.N.Sc., is Leonard and Helen Stulman chair in mental health and psychiatric nursing at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine. Prior to her appointment at the School of Nursing, she served as associate dean for research and as department chair at Rush University College of Nursing. Dr. Gross’s research focuses on promoting positive parent‒child relationships and preventing behavior problems in pre- school children from low-income neighborhoods. With colleagues at Rush, she developed the Chicago Parent Program, an innovative parenting pro- gram that has been shown to improve parenting behavior and reduce child behavior problems. This program is currently used in a number of settings, including Head Start centers in Chicago and New York City. From 2006 to 2009, Dr. Gross was a Robert Wood Johnson fellow in the Executive Nurse Fellows Program. She has served on numerous National Institutes of Health (NIH) panels and received several awards, including the President’s Award for outstanding research from the Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research. Maxine Hayes, M.D., M.P.H., is state health officer for the Washington State Department of Health. As the state’s top public health physician, her role includes advising the governor and the secretary of health on issues ranging from health promotion and chronic disease prevention to emer- gency response, including pandemic influenza preparedness. She also works closely with the medical community, local health departments, and com- munity groups. Prior to her appointment as health officer, Dr. Hayes was

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267 APPENDIX E assistant secretary of community and family health. She is clinical profes- sor of pediatrics at the University of Washington, School of Medicine, and on the Maternal and Child Health faculty of the School of Public Health. Dr. Hayes is an elected member of the IOM and has served as a member of the NRC–IOM Board on Children, Youth and Families and as chair of the Committee on the Impact of Pregnancy Weight on Maternal and Child Health. She received an M.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo and an M.P.H. from Harvard School of Public Health. Charles J. Homer, M.D., is president and chief executive officer of the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality (NICHQ). He is also an associate professor in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at Harvard University School of Public Health and an associ- ate clinical professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Prior to his position at NICHQ, he was director of the Clinical Effectiveness Program at Children’s Hospital Boston and served as program director of the first federally supported fellowship training program in pediatric health ser- vices research. Dr. Homer is a frequent speaker on quality measurement and quality improvement for children’s health care. He served on the IOM Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm-Next Steps Summit. He re- ceived an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Kevin B. Johnson, M.D., M.S., is professor and vice chair of biomedical informatics and professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Dr. Johnson is an internationally respected developer and evaluator of clinical information technology. His research interests have included the development and adoption of clinical information systems to improve patient safety and compliance with practice guidelines; the uses of advanced computer technologies, including the Worldwide Web, personal digital assistants, and pen-based computers, in medicine; and the develop- ment of computer-based documentation systems for the point of care. He also directed the development and evaluation of evidence-based pediatric care guidelines for Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Johnson was awarded membership in the American College of Medical Informatics in 2004, is a member of the American Board of Pediatrics’ Program for Maintenance of Certification Task Force, and has been actively involved with the program of Maintenance of Certification developed by the Board for all pediatri- cians. His knowledge of electronic health records and patient safety led to his appointment to the IOM’s Committee on Data Standards for Patient Safety and Committee on Identifying and Preventing Medication Errors. He received an M.D. from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and an M.S. in medical informatics from Stanford University.

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268 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH Genevieve M. Kenney, Ph.D., is a senior fellow and health economist at the Urban Institute with more than 20 years of experience in conducting research. She is a nationally renowned expert on health insurance coverage and health issues facing low-income children and families. Dr. Kenney was a lead researcher on two major evaluations of the Children’s Health Insur- ance Program (CHIP): a congressionally mandated evaluation for HHS and an evaluation supported by a number of private foundations. She has published numerous articles on insurance coverage and access to care for low-income children, pregnant women, and parents. In her research, she has examined a range of issues, including family coverage policies and the structure of CHIP financing; participation and barriers to enrollment; access and use differentials among low-income children; the effects of premium increases on enrollment; and the impacts of CHIP expansions on insurance coverage, crowd-out, and access to care. Dr. Kenney has also conducted research on a number of Medicaid and Medicare topics, including the impacts of Medicaid eligibility expansions for pregnant women and chil- dren, the adoption of managed care in Medicaid, the use of home health services among the dual-eligible population, and the impacts of Medicare’s prospective payment system on postacute services. In her current research, she is examining state-level Medicaid reforms, Medicaid coverage of fam- ily planning services, and state efforts to enroll more children in Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). She holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in economics and an M.A. in statistics from the University of Michigan. Marie C. McCormick, M.D., Sc.D., is professor of maternal and child health in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health and professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. She also serves as senior associate director of the Infant Follow-up Program at the Children’s Hospi- tal. Her research involves epidemiologic and health services research inves- tigations in areas related to infant mortality and the outcomes of high-risk neonates. More specifically, she focuses on the following areas: outcomes of infants experiencing neonatal complications such as low birth weight and interventions with the potential to ameliorate adverse outcomes, evaluation of programs designed to improve the health of families and children, and maternal health and prematurity. Dr. McCormick is a member of the IOM and most recently served on the Board on Children, Youth, and Families’ Committee on Developmental Outcomes and Assessments for Young Chil- dren. She received an M.D. from Johns Hopkins Medical School and an Sc.D. from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Kathryn M. McDonald, M.M./M.B.A., is executive director of the Center for Health Policy (CHP) and the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes

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269 APPENDIX E Research (PCOR) at Stanford University. She is also a senior scholar at the centers and associate director of the Stanford‒UCSF Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) in collaboration with RAND. Her work focuses on evidence-based medicine, medical technology assessment, health care quality, and patient safety measures and interventions. Her health care quality and patient safety research portfolio includes the publicly released Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Quality Indicators; the first comprehensive review of patient safety practices published in 2000 (Making Healthcare Safer); and more recently, a series of evidence reports on quality improvement strategies (Closing the Quality Gap). She continues to lead the Stanford development team for expansion of the AHRQ Quality Indicators, including the Pediatric Quality Indicators. She is also an active member of the Society for Decision Making and currently serves as its president. In earlier years at the Stanford School of Medicine, Ms. McDonald acquired her health services research training through her role as project director and investigator for a number of research projects, including the Cardiac Arrhythmia Patient Outcomes Research Team. Previ- ously, she worked as a manager for technology optimization and business development at Stanford Hospital and as a research manager for new product development at a medical device company. She received a master of management degree (M.B.A. equivalent) from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, with an emphasis on the health care indus- try and organizational behavior, and holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Stanford University. Michael J. O’Grady, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago and principal of O’Grady Health Policy LLC, a private health consulting firm. At NORC, he concentrates on health policy research and analysis for public and private nonprofit organizations. Dr. O’Grady’s current research includes serving as principal investigator for the cost-effectiveness component of a multiyear diabetes clinical trial, the formulation of policy options for an expanded federal role in the development of a national health information exchange, and the assessment of new developments in health insurance benefit design and cost sharing. He also serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors at CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. At O’Grady Health Policy LLC, he concentrates on strategic consulting and analysis for a range of for-profit organizations. This research includes the development of new modeling and methods for improving the federal budget process by intro- ducing the latest disease-based epidemiological modeling into budget esti- mates for interventions for chronic illness, particularly diabetes and obesity. Dr. O’Grady is a veteran health policy expert with 24 years of experience working in Congress and HHS. From 2003 to 2005, he was assistant sec-

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270 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH retary for planning and evaluation at HHS, where he directed both policy development and policy research across the full array of issues confronting the Department. During his tenure as assistant secretary, he increased the quality and rigor of the Department’s research and analysis significantly, providing rapid and critical analyses of legislative and regulatory proposals. Prior to his Senate confirmation as assistant secretary, Dr. O’Grady served as senior health economist on the majority staff of the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. Previously, he held senior staff positions with the Senate Finance Committee, the Bipartisan Commission for the Future of Medicare, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, and the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress. He received a Ph.D. in political science at the University of Rochester. Alan R. Weil, M.P.P., J.D., is executive director of the National Academy for State Health Policy. Previously, he served for 7 years as director of the Assessing the New Federalism project at the Urban Institute, one of the largest privately funded social policy research projects ever undertaken in the United States. He has also held a cabinet position as executive director of the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing, was health policy advisor to Colorado Governor Roy Romer, and was assistant general counsel in the Massachusetts Department of Medical Security. He is coeditor of two books—Welfare Reform: The Next Act and Federalism and Health Policy—and has authored chapters in a number of books and published articles in journals including Health Affairs and Inquiry. Mr. Weil was an appointed member of President Clinton’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry, which drafted the patient’s bill of rights. He is a member of the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured and the Commonwealth Fund Commission on a High Performance Health System. Mr. Weil currently serves on the IOM Board on Health Care Services. He received an M.P.P. from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. Alan M. Zaslavsky, Ph.D., is professor of health care policy in the Depart- ment of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. His health services research focuses primarily on developing methodology for quality measure- ment of health plans and providers and understanding the implications of these quality measurements. An important part of his work concerns the development, implementation, and analysis of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey. He has studied individual characteristics affecting responses to the survey, dimensions of quality measured, the contributions of the health plan and geographic lo- cation to CAHPS-measured quality, comparisons of traditional Medicare

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271 APPENDIX E and Medicare Advantage, and risk selection among health plans. He is developing methods for integrating cancer registry data with surveys and medical record reviews to better detect such relationships. Dr. Zaslavsky has served on numerous NRC and IOM committees and currently serves on the Committee on National Statistics and chairs the Panel to Review Alternative Data Sources for the Limited-English Proficiency Allocation Formula under Title III, Part A, Elementary and Secondary Education Act. He received an M.S. in statistics and computer science from Northeastern University and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics, with a specialty in statistics, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Study Staff Rosemary Chalk is director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, a joint effort of the IOM and NRC. She is a policy analyst who has been a study director at the National Academies since 1987. She has directed or served as a senior staff member for more than a dozen IOM and NRC stud- ies, including studies on vaccine finance, the public health infrastructure for immunization, family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics and misconduct in science, and education finance. From 2000 to 2003, Ms. Chalk directed a research project on the development of child well-being indicators for the child welfare system at Child Trends in Washington, DC. She previously served as a consultant for science and society research proj- ects at the Harvard School of Public Health and was an Exxon research fellow in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. She was program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from 1976 to 1986. She holds a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati. Patti Simon is a program officer for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families at the National Academies. She is currently working on studies for two IOM/NRC committees: the Committee on Pediatric Health and Health Care Quality Measures and the Committee on Oral Health Services: Equity and Access to Care. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Simon worked in the Department of Health Policy at The George Washington University, where she managed a national program focused on health dis- parities and the social determinants of health. She holds an M.P.H. and a B.S. in psychology, both from the University of Texas. Pamella Atayi is a senior program assistant for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She is currently supporting the Committee on Pediatric Health and Health Care Quality Measures, as well as a project on the sci-

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272 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH ence of family research. Ms. Atayi has worked with a number of nonprofit organizations over the past 10 years—most recently with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s public policy office on Capitol Hill. She received her B.A. in English from the University of Maryland University College and holds a diploma in computer information systems from Strayer College. Wendy E. Keenan is a program associate for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She helps organize planning meetings and workshops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families, and provides administrative and research support to the Board’s various program com- mittees. Ms. Keenan has been on the National Academies’ staff for 10 years and has worked on studies for both the IOM and NRC. As a senior program assistant, she worked with the NRC’s Board on Behavioral, Cog- nitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, she taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from The Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in liberal studies at Georgetown University. Yeonwoo Lebovitz is a research associate with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Prior to joining the Board in November 2010, she worked as a program associate with IOM’s Board on Health Sciences Policy and as a regulatory affairs associate at Amgen. Ms. Lebovitz earned a B.A. in International Affairs and German Language and Literature from the George Washington University, and is an M.S. candidate for the Biomedical Science Policy and Advocacy program at Georgetown University. Julienne Marie Palbusa is a research assistant for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She joined the staff in December 2008. She is a 2007 graduate of The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, where she earned a B.S. in psychology with a minor in kinesiology.