Appendix E

Committee and Staff Biographies

Frederick P. Rivara, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is currently the Seattle Children’s Guild Endowed Chair in Pediatrics and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology in the University of Washington School of Public Health, Vice-Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, and Head of the Division of General Pediatrics. He is Editor of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. Dr. Rivara’s current research interests include prevention of intimate partner violence, reducing alcohol-related trauma, determining the long-term outcome of children with traumatic brain injury, and studying the effectiveness of trauma systems in the care of pediatric and adult trauma patients. He served as founding director of the Harborview Injury and Research Center in Seattle for 13 years, founding president of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, and his contributions to the field have spanned 30 years. He has received numerous honors including the Charles C. Shepard Science Award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Public Health Association, Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section Distinguished Career Award, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Injury and Poison Prevention, Physician Achievement Award. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Rivara received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Paul C. Erwin, M.D., Dr.P.H., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Prior to this appointment he served as the Regional Director, East Tennessee Region, in



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Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographies Frederick P. Rivara, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is currently the Seattle Chil- dren’s Guild Endowed Chair in Pediatrics and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology in the University of Washington School of Public Health, Vice-Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, and Head of the Division of General Pediatrics. He is Editor of Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. Dr. Rivara’s current research interests include prevention of intimate partner violence, reducing alcohol-related trauma, determining the long-term outcome of children with traumatic brain injury, and study- ing the effectiveness of trauma systems in the care of pediatric and adult trauma patients. He served as founding director of the Harborview Injury and Research Center in Seattle for 13 years, founding president of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention, and his contributions to the field have spanned 30 years. He has received numerous honors including the Charles C. Shepard Science Award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Public Health Associa- tion, Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section Distinguished Career Award, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Injury and Poison Prevention, Physician Achievement Award. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Rivara received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Paul C. Erwin, M.D., Dr.P.H., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Health at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Prior to this appointment he served as the Regional Director, East Tennessee Region, in 271

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272 IMPROVING ACCESS TO ORAL HEALTH CARE the Tennessee Department of Health for 12 years. Dr. Erwin received a B.S. from the University of the South (Sewanee, Tennessee); an M.D. from the University of Alabama in Birmingham; an M.P.H. in International Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health; and a Dr.P.H. at UNC/Chapel Hill. Dr. Erwin was a Fellow in International Health at the Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan. He also served as a Scholar of the CDC/University of California Public Health Leadership Insti- tute, 1995. Currently, Dr. Erwin is board certified in Internal Medicine and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine and is a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He is also a board member of the Tennessee Institute of Public Health, 2007–present, and the Public Health Foundation, 2009–present. Since 2007, he has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for United Health Foundation’s America’s Health Rankings report and the Research and Evaluation Committee of the Public Health Accreditation Board. Dr. Erwin’s public health-related research and publica- tions have been in the areas of public health systems and services research, health inequities/poverty and health, and infectious/communicable diseases. Caswell A. Evans, Jr., D.D.S., M.P.H., is currently the Associate Dean for Prevention and Public Health Sciences at the University of Illinois, Chicago College of Dentistry. He served as the Executive Editor and Project Director of Oral Health in America: A Report of the U.S. Surgeon General. For 12 years, Dr. Evans served as Director of Public Health Programs and Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. He also served as Adjunct Professor for the School of Public Health and the School of Dentistry at the University of California, Los Angeles; Visiting Professor of Dentistry at Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery; and Distinguished Minority Visiting Professor at the Boston University Health Sciences Center. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Evans is a Past President of the American Public Health Association, the American Association of Public Health Dentistry, and the American Board of Dental Public Health. He was the first recipient of the Beverlee A. Myers Award for Excellence in Public Health, conferred by the California State Department of Health Services. He was also honored with the Champion of Prevention Award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Theodore G. Ganiats, M.D., is professor of Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, and Executive Director of the UCSD Health Services Research Center. He has been a member or chair of over 40 national guideline and quality/performance panels spanning multiple disciplines. His research in- terests involve outcomes research, focusing on quality-of-life assessment and cost-effectiveness analysis. He is a member of the Society for Medical

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273 APPENDIX E Decision Making, Academy Health, the American Public Health Associa- tion, and the International Society for Quality of Life Research. Dr. Ga- niats is a member of the IOM, Section 8 for Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine, and Physical Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Diego. Shelly Gehshan, M.P.P., is the director of the Pew Children’s Dental Cam- paign. Prior to joining Pew, she spent nearly 20 years working for state policy makers on a range of issues affecting low-income women and chil- dren, such as oral health, behavioral health, reproductive health, service delivery, and health care financing through Medicaid and SCHIP. From 2005 to 2008, Ms. Gehshan served as a senior program director at the Na- tional Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) in Washington, DC. She developed NASHP’s extensive portfolio of work in the area of oral health and directed projects on health care reform, Medicaid, behavioral health, and juvenile justice. Before joining NASHP, Ms. Gehshan spent 9 years as a program director for the National Conference of State Legislatures. At NCSL, she served as managing director and senior policy analyst for the Forum for State Health Policy Leadership, which provides training, policy analyses, and technical assistance for legislators and legislative staff. Ms. Gehshan spent 6 years as deputy director of the Southern Governors’ As- sociation’s Infant Mortality Project, where she worked with governors and state legislators to expand access to prenatal care for low-income women. Ms. Gehshan has also served as the vice-chair of the board of directors for the Children’s Dental Health Project. She has a master’s degree in public policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley. Kathy Voigt Geurink, R.D.H., B.S., M.A., is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Dental Hygiene, School of Health Professions, Univer- sity of Texas Health Science Center. She has been recognized with various awards for her impact on the field of dental hygiene and in advancing the role of the dental hygienist in public health. Her textbook, Community Oral Health Practice, is widely used in dental hygiene programs nation- wide. She serves as a consultant on the ASTDD School and Adolescent Oral Health Committee working with experts from around the country to advocate and support efforts to improve the oral health of children and adolescents. She has worked throughout her career with Head Start in addressing access to care for pregnant women, children, and families through the development of programs including oral health education, disease prevention, and referrals to dental homes. She also coordinates an ASTDD Committee on Healthy Aging to support assessment, policy devel- opment and assurance efforts in states. In 2011, she received the ASTDD

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274 IMPROVING ACCESS TO ORAL HEALTH CARE Distinguished Service Award for service to ASTDD and community oral health programs. Paul Glassman, D.D.S., M.A., M.B.A., is professor of Dental Practice and Director of Community Oral Health at the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry at the University of the Pacific. He is a former president of the Special Care Dentistry Association, a national organization dedicated to improving oral health for people with special needs and older adults. He is director of the Pacific Center for Special Care and director of the Califor- nia Statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Disabilities and Aging Californians. His research focuses on developing community-based systems for improving oral health for underserved populations; dentistry for patients with special needs, medical disabilities, and dental fear; and geriatric dentistry. He received his dental degree from the University of California, San Francisco. David M. Krol, M.D., M.P.H., a general pediatrician, is Team Director and Senior Program Officer, Human Capital for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Prior to joining the Foundation, Dr. Krol was an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of To- ledo College of Medicine. He is a leader in children’s oral health advocacy and policy with a focus on the interface between primary care pediatrics and dentistry. Dr. Krol has published in scientific journals such as Pedi- atrics, Advances in Pediatrics, Pediatrics in Review, and others on topics such as children’s oral health and health workforce policy. He partnered with the Children’s Dental Health Project in his role as recipient of a Soros Advocacy Fellowship for Physicians. He was a RWJ Clinical Scholar and Bush Fellow in Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University. He was selected as a Pediatric Leader of the 21st Century by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Krol received his medical degree from the Yale School of Medicine and his M.P.H. from Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health. Jane Perkins, J.D., M.P.H., is the Legal Director for National Health Law Program. She focuses on Medicaid, particularly the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) program and discrimination in the delivery of health care. She engages in litigation and policy advocacy on these topics, manages NHeLP’s litigation docket, and has written manu- als, fact sheets, and numerous articles on Medicaid, civil rights, and federal court access. She also provides legal assistance and training to consumer advocates and health care consumers. Ms. Perkins is the co-author of To- ward a Healthy Future: Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment Services for Poor Children and Youth, a Medicaid EPSDT

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275 APPENDIX E resource manual. She was a 1997 recipient of the Reginald Heber Smith Award from the National Legal Aid and Defender Association for dedicated service and outstanding achievement as an indigent defense attorney. In 2009, Ms. Perkins received the Defender of Justice award from the North Carolina Justice Center. She earned her M.P.H. from the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, in 1982; her J.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1981; and her B.A. from Davidson College in 1978. Margaret A. Potter, M.S., J.D., is at the University of Pittsburgh holding positions in the Graduate School of Public Health as Associate Dean & Director of the Center for Public Health Practice and Associate Professor of Health Policy & Management. Her research interests include access to health services, public health systems including workforce development and financing, and public health law and policy. She has chaired national work groups on academic public health practice, focusing on the translation of scholarship to policy and practice. She is immediate past-chair of the board of directors of the Public Health Foundation. She earned a Master of Sci- ence degree in biomedical information systems from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Juris Doctor degree from the Rutgers-Newark School of Law. Renee Samelson, M.D., M.P.H., FACOG, is currently Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Albany Medical College and is a mem- ber of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine. She is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and Preventive Medicine/Public Health with subspecialty board certification in Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Her high- risk obstetrical practice includes management of medical problems includ- ing diabetes and hypertension, obstetrical complications, prepregnancy consultations, prenatal diagnosis and treatment including evaluation of congenital anomalies, and first trimester screening. In 2006, Samelson was the co-editor of Oral Health Care During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Clinical Practice Guidelines. This document was the result of the work of an expert panel convened by the New York State Department of Health to develop recommendations for health care professionals in educating women about oral health and improving the overall health of women and children. Dr. Samelson had participated in multiple committees of the NIH Pediatric Aids Clinical Trial Group and was the Albany obstetrical principal investi- gator in several HIV perinatal trials. She continues to serve as a consultant to the NYS AIDS Institute. Phyllis W. Sharps, Ph.D., RN, CNE, FAAN, is professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and the Associate Dean for Community and Global Programs. Her research and expertise focuses on addressing ma-

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276 IMPROVING ACCESS TO ORAL HEALTH CARE ternal child health disparities for vulnerable populations. She is currently Principal Investigator of a major NIH-funded test of a home visiting inter- vention for pregnant women to help end violence in their lives and prevent consequent trauma-related mental and physical health outcomes for both women and their infants. The intervention builds on her years of clinical practice and research including her work to develop, provide, and test a prenatal intervention to prevent low birth weight and other maternal child health problems in inner-city Baltimore and Washington, DC. She provides leadership in interdisciplinary research efforts and policy initiatives that are culturally appropriate, real-world based, and that address health iniquities. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore. Linda H. Southward, Ph.D., ACSW, is a Research Fellow at the Social Sci- ence Research Center of Mississippi State University. She was a leader in establishing the Child Care, Health, and Early Education Research Consor- tium (CHEER) of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has led several surveys of children care directors’ perspectives of a variety of early care and education issues, enabling investigation of systemic and pervasive child care research issues, including children’s oral health status. She has also led a project on children’s oral health with the Mississippi chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and has served as Principal Investigator in a 5-year AHRQ-funded study to determine to feasibility of developing an intervention to reduce dental caries of preschool children in 12 Mississippi Delta counties. Currently, Dr. Southward is leading a 5-year RWJ-funded study to evaluate the effectiveness of the Mississippi Healthy Student Act of 2007 in the areas of health education, physical education, and nutritional practices among Mississippi’s public schools, students, parents, and policy makers in addressing childhood overweight and obesity in Mississippi. In addition, she coordinates the MS KIDS COUNT program. She earned a Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Alabama. Maria Rosa Watson, D.D.S., M.S., Dr.PH., is Board Diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health, a licensed Dentist in the District of Columbia, and has a Dr.PH from the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. From 1994 to 2002 she served on the faculty of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Maryland Dental School. She has received NIH funding in the areas of community-based participatory research and health literacy. She is currently co-investigator of a NIH/NIMH Intervention and Practice Re- search Infrastructure Program (IP-RISP) grant, “Improving Health Services for Low-Income Latinos in Primary Care,” of the Boston University and NIH-funded study “Partnering with Community Health Centers to Prevent

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277 APPENDIX E Early Childhood Caries,” and of a project to develop a research agenda from the community perspective. She has served as independent evaluator to a University of South Florida-CDC grant focused on using CBPR in the implementation of a peer-led chronic illness self-management program, and to an oral health pilot program to increase access to dental care for adult Montgomery County residents, which now has been expanded to serve uninsured children. She received her B.S. and D.D.S. from the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia, a M.S. in Pediatric Dentistry and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan, followed by postgraduate residency train- ing in dental public health with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Barbara Wolfe, Ph.D., is Professor of Economics, Population Health Sci- ences, and Public Affairs and Faculty Affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses broadly on poverty and health issues. Current projects examine the effect of expansions in public health insurance on health care coverage and labor force outcomes; the role of income on health using a natural experiment and using evidence from brain scans; whether housing voucher programs lead to higher earnings, higher-quality child care, and less reliance on other public assistance programs; and the increasing selectivity of high-quality universities. Recent work addresses the effects of welfare reform; econom- ics of disability; ties among income, wealth, and health; racial disparities in health; and intergenerational determinants of success in young adults. She is a member of the IOM, Section 11 for social sciences, humanities, and law, and previously served as vice-chair of the Board on Children, Youth and Families. Her recent articles have appeared in the Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Human Resources, International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Economy Inquiry, Journal of Health Economics, and Demography. She received her doctorate in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania. INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE STAFF Tracy A. Harris, D.P.M., M.P.H., is a Senior Program Officer with the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Board on Health Care Services. Dr. Harris was trained in podiatric medicine and surgery and spent several years in private practice. In 1999, she was awarded a Congressional Fellowship with the American Association for the Advancement of Science and spent 1 year working in the U.S. Senate. Dr. Harris joined the IOM in 2004. Her most recent work has focused on aging and the health care workforce. She was the study director for the 2008 report Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Health Care Workforce. In 2009, she staffed a National Academies-wide initiative on the “Grand Challenges of an Aging Society”

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278 IMPROVING ACCESS TO ORAL HEALTH CARE and directed a workshop on the oral health care workforce. Dr. Harris is the study director for this current report, the recently released report Ad- vancing Oral Health in America, and director of a workshop on the allied health workforce. Dr. Harris has a doctor of podiatric medicine degree from Temple University and a master of public health degree with a concentra- tion in health policy from The George Washington University. Patti Simon, M.P.H., is a Senior Program Officer with the Institute of Medi- cine’s (IOM’s) Board on Children, Youth, and Families. In addition to her work on this current report, Ms. Simon served as the program officer for the recently released report Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters. Prior to joining the IOM in 2009, Ms. Simon worked in the Department of Health Policy at The George Washing- ton University, where she managed a national program focused on health disparities and the social determinants of health. She holds an M.P.H. with a concentration in health education and health promotion from the Univer- sity of Texas School of Public Health. Meg Barry, J.D., M.P.H., is an Associate Program Officer on the Board on Health Care Services. She joined the IOM in 2009. She has worked on two studies related to oral health, and recently began working on a study of geographic variation in health care spending and promotion of high value care. Before joining the IOM, she worked on health care regulatory matters at a national law firm and reauthorization of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program at the New America Foundation. Previously, she worked as a research scientist at Northwestern University. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law School and School of Public Health. Wendy E. Keenan is a program associate for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She helps organize planning meetings and workshops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families, and provides administrative and research support to the Board’s various program com- mittees. Ms. Keenan has been on the National Academies’ staff for 10 years and has worked on studies for both the IOM and NRC. As a senior program assistant, she worked with the NRC’s Board on Behavioral, Cog- nitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, she taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from The Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in liberal studies at Georgetown University. Amy Asheroff joined the IOM in 2009 as a senior program assistant for the Board on Health Care Services and the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. She works on several projects: the Committee on an Oral Health

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279 APPENDIX E Initiative, Committee on Oral Health Access to Services, Committee on the Mental Health Workforce for Geriatric Populations, and a workshop on the allied health workforce. Prior to joining the IOM, she served a year of service in a safety net medical clinic in northwest Washington, DC, through AmeriCorps. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a bachelor’s degree in the History of Art and Italian. Rosemary Chalk is director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, a joint effort of the IOM and NRC. She is a policy analyst who has been a study director at the National Academies since 1987. She has directed or served as a senior staff member for more than a dozen IOM and NRC stud- ies, including studies on vaccine finance, the public health infrastructure for immunization, family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics and misconduct in science, and education finance. From 2000 to 2003, Ms. Chalk directed a research project on the development of child well-being indicators for the child welfare system at Child Trends in Washington, DC. She previously served as a consultant for science and society research proj- ects at the Harvard School of Public Health and was an Exxon research fellow in the Program on Science, Technology, and Society at the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology. She was program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science from 1976 to 1986. She holds a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati.