F
Committee Member Biographical Sketches

John W. Erdman, Jr., Ph.D. (Chair), is Professor Emeritus of Nutrition and Food Science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the effects of food processing on nutrient retention, the metabolic roles of vitamin A and beta-carotene, the bioavailability of minerals from foods, and the influence of food components on prostate cancer. His research regarding soy protein has extended into studies on the impact of non-nutrient components of foods such as phytoestrogens on chronic disease. Dr. Erdman has published over 160 peer-reviewed research papers. He chaired the 1988 Gordon Conference on Carotenoids, and has served as a Burroughs Wellcome Visiting Professor in Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Georgia, and the G. Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. His awards include the Borden Award from the American Society for Nutrition and the Babcock-Hart Award from the Institute of Food Technologists. He has served on a number of Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including service as chair of the Standing Committee on Dietary Reference Intakes and vice chair of the Food and Nutrition Board. Dr. Erdman has served on many editorial boards, and on many program and planning committees for the American Society of Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Academy of Sciences. In 1992, he was elected a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists, and in 2003 he was elected a fellow of the American Heart Association. Dr. Erdman was elected to the IOM in 2003 and serves as chair of the standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research. Dr. Erdman received his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers University.


E. Wayne Askew, Ph.D., is Professor of Nutrition and the Director of the Division of Nutrition in the College of Health at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He teaches metabolism and sports nutrition and conducts research on nutrition and human performance. Prior to his current position at the University of Utah, he was a Medical Service Corps Officer with the U.S. Army Medical Department. His assignments included the U.S. Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratory, Denver, CO; Letterman Army Institute of Research, Pre-



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F Committee Member Biographical Sketches John W. Erdman, Jr., Ph.D. (Chair), is Professor Emeritus of Nutrition and Food Science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the effects of food processing on nutrient retention, the metabolic roles of vitamin A and beta-carotene, the bioavailability of minerals from foods, and the influence of food components on prostate cancer. His research regarding soy protein has extended into stud- ies on the impact of non-nutrient components of foods such as phytoestrogens on chronic disease. Dr. Erdman has published over 160 peer-reviewed research papers. He chaired the 1988 Gordon Conference on Carotenoids, and has served as a Burroughs Wellcome Visit- ing Professor in Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Georgia, and the G. Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. His awards include the Borden Award from the American Society for Nutrition and the Babcock-Hart Award from the Institute of Food Technologists. He has served on a number of Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees, including service as chair of the Standing Committee on Dietary Reference Intakes and vice chair of the Food and Nutrition Board. Dr. Erdman has served on many editorial boards, and on many program and planning committees for the American Society of Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the National Academy of Sciences. In 1992, he was elected a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists, and in 2003 he was elected a fellow of the American Heart Association. Dr. Erdman was elected to the IOM in 2003 and serves as chair of the standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research. Dr. Erdman received his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers University. E. Wayne Askew, Ph.D., is Professor of Nutrition and the Director of the Division of Nutri- tion in the College of Health at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He teaches metabo- lism and sports nutrition and conducts research on nutrition and human performance. Prior to his current position at the University of Utah, he was a Medical Service Corps Officer with the U.S. Army Medical Department. His assignments included the U.S. Army Medical Research and Nutrition Laboratory, Denver, CO; Letterman Army Institute of Research, Pre- 427

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428 NUTRITION AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY sidio of San Francisco, CA; Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI; and the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, where he was Chief of Military Nutrition Research for the U.S. Army. His research involves the study of oxidative stress, biochemical adaptations to exercise training, the role of nutrition in physical performance, assessment of nutritional status, and nutrition for human performance in environmental extremes including heat, cold and high altitude. He is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Society for Nutrition, the American Dietetic Association, the International Society for Mountain Medicine, and the Wilderness Medical Society. He has served as a member of the United States Olympic Committee Nutrition Advisory Com- mittee and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee on Food Safety. He currently serves as vice chair of the standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from the Institute of Nutrition, Michigan State University. Bruce R. Bistrian, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Chief of Clinical Nutrition at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Formerly he was Co- Director of Hyperalimentation Services at New England Deaconess Hospital, and a lecturer in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Bistrian is board-certified in Internal Medicine and, from 1997–2007, in Criti- cal Care Medicine. Dr. Bistrian’s primary research interests include nutritional assessment, metabolic effects of acute infections, nutritional support of hospitalized patients, and the pathophysiology of protein-calorie malnutrition. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and has received an honorary M.A. from Harvard University. Dr. Bistrian is the 2004 recipient of the Goldberger Award of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bistrian has been President of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, President of the (former) American Society of Clinical Nutrition and President of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Dr. Bistrian has served on the editorial boards of numerous nutrition and medical journals, and is the author or coauthor of over 400 articles in scientific publications. He is a member of the standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research and has served on several IOM ad hoc committees, including the Com- mittee on Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Personnel and the Committee on Mineral Requirements for Cognitive and Physical Performance of Military Personnel. He earned his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University, his M.D. from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism from MIT. Joseph G. Cannon, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Biomedical Technologies and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Allied Health Sciences at the Georgia Health Science University (GHSU). Formerly, he was Professor of Applied Physiol- ogy at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Cannon’s primary research interests include the immunological mechanisms involved in bone turnover and vascular function, as well as nu- tritional and hormonal influences on leukocyte function. He holds the Kellett Chair in Allied Health Sciences at GHSU. Dr. Cannon has served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Physiology and Journal of Applied Physiology and is the author or coauthor of over 100 articles in scientific publications. He is a member of the standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research and has served on the Committee on Mineral Requirements for Cognitive and Physical Performance on Military Personnel. Dr. Cannon holds a B.S. in engineering from Michigan State University, an M.S. in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Ph.D. in physiology from the University of Michigan.

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429 APPENDIX F Xiang Gao, M.D., Ph.D., is Research Scientist in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health and Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Gao’s research investigates the relationships between environmental and dietary factors and the risk of neurological diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and Rest- less legs syndrome. He serves as the Principal Investigator of a prospective study of restless legs syndrome funded by an R01 Research Project Grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr. Gao works with data from several large, ongoing cohorts, including the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. He also works on dietary pattern methodology, employing mathematical approaches to evaluate U.S. nutritional recommendations, including the Food Pyramid and the Dietary Ref- erence Intakes. Dr. Gao has published over 60 original articles and is first or senior author on about 35. He has served on the mentoring committee of Parkinson Study Group since 2008. Dr. Gao won the Irwin H. Rosenberg Award for excellence in predoctoral research from the Jean Mayor U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in 2006, the Mentored Clinical Research Award from the Parkinson Study Group in 2007, and the Wayne A. Hening Sleep Medicine Investigator Award from the American Academy of Neurology in 2011. Dr. Gao received his M.S. from the Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College and his M.D. from Shanghai Second Medical University. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional epidemiology from Tufts University School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Col. Michael Jaffee, M.D., began his fellowship training in sleep medicine at the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium (SAUSHEC) on July 1, 2010. Previously, Col. Jaffee served as National Director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC). Prior to his selection as DVBIC national director, Col. Jaffee served as the SAUSHEC Neurology Program Director at Wilford Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base and as the DVBIC San Antonio Site Director. He currently serves as the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Surgeon General Neurology Consultant. Col. Jaffee has served as an Aerospace Neurology Consultant at the Aerospace Consultation Service/USAF School of Aerospace Medicine and as the USAF Psychiatry Consultant on security clearance issues. His academic appointments include Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center and As- sistant Professor of Neurology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He is also on the clinical faculty at the University of Virginia. Col. Jaffee serves as a Visit- ing Scientist to the Center for Information Technology of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). His honors and awards include being the only Department of Defense physician selected as a William Webb fellow by the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine for excel- lence in advancing the understanding of the mind-body interface, citations from the U.S. Surgeon General and the Iraqi Surgeon General, and commendations from four cabinet-level departments as well as the Congressional Brain Injury Task Force. He was selected as the active-duty U.S. delegate to North Atlantic Treaty Organization for international coordina- tion of traumatic brain injury initiatives. He has been involved in extensive research in the area of traumatic brain injury and is the author of many articles and papers. He has served on many federal panels and review boards and has been an invited speaker at many national and international conferences as well as to the Institute of Medicine. Col. Jaffee holds an M.D. from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, as well as a B.S. in Economics from the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce. He completed residency training at Wilford Hall Medical Center where he was

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430 NUTRITION AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY selected as chief resident for the departments of both Neurology and Psychiatry. He is board- certified in both neurology and psychiatry. Robin B. Kanarek, Ph.D., is the John Wade Professor of Psychology at Tufts University. Her prior experience includes Research Fellow, Division of Endocrinology of the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, and Research Fellow in Nutrition at Harvard University. Additionally, she served as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University from 2002 to 2006. Dr. Kanarek’s research focuses on the role of nutrition in determining brain functioning and behavior. In addition to reviewing for numerous jour- nals, including Science, Brain Research Bulletin, Journal of Nutrition, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and Annals of Internal Medicine, she is a member of the editorial boards of Physiology & Behavior and the Tufts Diet and Nutrition Newsletter and is a past Editor in chief of Nutrition and Behavior. Dr. Kanarek has served on ad hoc review committees for the National Science Foundation, the NIH, and USDA nutrition research, as well as the Member Program Committee of the Eastern Psychological Association. She is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition and the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society and her other professional memberships include the American Institute of Nutrition, New York Academy of Sciences, the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior, and the Society for Neurosciences. She is a member of the IOM Standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research and served on the Committee on Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Person- nel. Dr. Kanarek received a B.A. in biology from Antioch College, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in psychology from Rutgers University. Cathy W. Levenson, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Biomedical Science and Neuroscience in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medi- cine, where she serves as the Course Director for Medical Biochemistry and Genetics. Her current research focuses on neurogenesis; her lab uses rodent models as well as cultured human neuronal precursor cells to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of adult stem cells in the brain. Dr. Levenson is a member of the Society for Neuroscience and of the American Society for Nutrition. She also served as a research associate in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Cousins at the University of Florida. She received her B.A. from the University of Virginia, her M.S. from Florida State University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Esther F. Myers, Ph.D., R.D., is the Chief Science Officer at the American Dietetic Associa- tion (ADA) and is an internationally known author, lecturer, educator and researcher. She is a retired member of the USAF, where she served as Chief Consultant to the Air Force Surgeon General for Nutrition and Dietetics; associate chief, Biomedical Sciences Corps for Dietetics; and flight commander, Nutritional Medicine, at the 60th Medical Group. Dr. Myers has authored several papers describing evidence analysis processes and the ADA process and coauthored a chapter on systematic reviews of evidence for Research: Successful Approaches, edited by Elaine Monsen. She is actively involved in research projects focusing on evaluating the impact of nutrition services in Medicare Demonstration projects, and in collaboration with Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina. Dr. Myers is the ADA staff liaison with the Nutrition Care Process and Standardized Language Committee which is developing and validating terminology to reflect the nutrition care for standardized language systems and electronic health records. Prior to joining ADA, she served as a site visitor for the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education, a peer reviewer for the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, and a member of the Health Services Research Task

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431 APPENDIX F Force overseeing dietetic outcomes research. She currently focuses her efforts on research activities needed for the dietetics profession and the Association as well as the ADA strategic leadership initiative in obesity and the ADA Foundation initiative, Healthy Weight for Kids. Dr. Myers has served on the Committee on the Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Per- sonnel and the Committee on Nutrition Services for Medicare Beneficiaries. She is a member of the IOM Standing Committee on Military Nutrition Research. Linda J. Noble, Ph.D., is Professor of Neurological Surgery and Physical Therapy and Reha- bilitation Science at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She holds the Alvera L. Kan Endowed Chair in the Department of Neurological Surgery, is Vice Chair of the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, co-directs the Neurobehavioral Core for Rehabilitation Research, and is a Principal Investigator of the Brain and Spinal In- jury Center at UCSF. Dr. Noble has an established expertise in the field of neurotrauma and hers is one of few laboratories that has developed models of both traumatic brain and spinal cord injury in the mouse that mimic the human conditions. Such modeling has provided a unique opportunity to study transgenic animals and has been used to identify specific factors that influence vascular permeability and inflammation and mediate cell injury after either traumatic spinal cord or brain injury. Dr. Noble is a member of Society for Neuroscience, the American Association for Anatomists, and the Society for Neurotrauma. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Neurotrauma and Developmental Neuroscience and is a Review Editor for Frontiers in Neurotrauma. She currently chairs the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/National Spasomdic Dysphonia Association study section and is on the external review committee for Mission Connect, Houston, Texas. Dr. Noble served on the IOM Committee on Gulf War and Health: Brain Injury in Veterans and Long-Term Health Outcomes. She holds a B.S. from the University of Utah and the University of Nevada and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Ross D. Zafonte, D.O., is the Earle P. and Ida S. Charlton Chairman of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, the Vice President of Medical Affairs at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, and the Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Zafonte maintains a clinical practice in which he cares for patients with a wide variety of disabilities, including traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, compressive neuropathies, spasticity, and postconcussive musculoskeletal conditions. He currently leads an NIH multisite clini- cal trial on the treatment of traumatic brain injury and the Traumatic Brain Injury/Post- traumatic Stress Disorder program at the Center for Integration of Medicine & Innovative Technology, which partners with the Department of Defense. Dr. Zafonte is the author of numerous publications about traumatic brain injuries and other rehabilitation topics. He has also served as an editor of several successful textbooks for the field, and has given more than 100 national and international presentations on topics in the field of rehabilitation. He is associate editor for the journals PM&R and the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Dr. Zafonte completed his residency in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

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