D
Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

Robert Graham, M.D. (Chair), is professor of family medicine and Robert and Myfanwy Smith Endowed Chair in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, School of Medicine, a position he has held since March 2005. Dr. Graham was previously associated with the discipline of family medicine as executive vice president/CEO of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) (1985–2000), head of the Academy’s Foundation (1988–1997), and administrative officer of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (1973–1975). In addition to his activities in family medicine, Dr. Graham has held a number of leadership positions in the federal health sector, including the position of administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) (1981–1985), during which time he also held the rank of rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and served as an assistant surgeon general. He also served in senior positions at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2001–2004), the Health Resources Administration (1976–1979), and the Health Services and Mental Health Administration (1970–1973). From 1979 to 1980, he served as a professional staff member of the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Health. Throughout his career, Dr. Graham has spoken extensively and written about a number of critical topics in health policy, such as health care reform and the need for universal health insurance coverage, federal health workforce policy, and the organizational characteristics of effective health systems. Dr. Graham’s contributions and expertise in health policy have been recognized by his election to the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine (IOM), and his selection as board chair of the bipartisan Alliance of Health Reform. His



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D Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff Robert Graham, M.D. (Chair), is professor of family medicine and Robert and Myfanwy Smith Endowed Chair in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, School of Medicine, a position he has held since March 2005. Dr. Graham was previously associated with the disci- pline of family medicine as executive vice president/CEO of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) (1985–2000), head of the Acad- emy’s Foundation (1988–1997), and administrative officer of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (1973–1975). In addition to his activities in family medicine, Dr. Graham has held a number of leadership positions in the federal health sector, including the position of administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) (1981–1985), dur- ing which time he also held the rank of rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service and served as an assistant surgeon general. He also served in senior positions at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2001–2004), the Health Resources Administration (1976–1979), and the Health Services and Mental Health Administration (1970–1973). From 1979 to 1980, he served as a professional staff mem- ber of the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Health. Throughout his career, Dr. Graham has spoken extensively and written about a number of critical topics in health policy, such as health care reform and the need for universal health insurance coverage, federal health workforce policy, and the organi- zational characteristics of effective health systems. Dr. Graham’s contribu- tions and expertise in health policy have been recognized by his election to the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine (IOM), and his selection as board chair of the bipartisan Alliance of Health Reform. His 321

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322 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE current areas of interest are leadership development, organizational change, and universal health insurance coverage. Dr. Graham is a graduate of Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana (1965), and the University of Kansas School of Medicine in Kansas City, Kansas (1970). Bobbie A. Berkowitz, Ph.D, RN, CNAA, FAAN, is currently dean and Mary O’Neil Mundinger Professor of Nursing at Columbia University School of Nursing and senior vice president of the Columbia University Medical Center. She was previously Alumni Endowed Professor of Nurs- ing and chair of the Department of Psychosocial and Community Health at the University of Washington School of Nursing and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine. In addition, she served as a consulting professor with Duke University and the University of California, Davis. Dr. Berkowitz directed the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)–funded Center for the Advancement of Health Disparities Research and the National Program Office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)–funded Turning Point Initiative. She joined the faculty at the University of Washington after having served as deputy secretary for the Washington State Department of Health and chief of nursing services for the Seattle-King County Depart- ment of Public Health. Dr. Berkowitz has been a member of the Washing- ton State Board of Health, the Washington Health Care Commission, and the board of the American Academy of Nursing and chaired the board of trustees of Group Health Cooperative. She serves on a number of editorial boards, including those of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice and American Journal of Public Health, Policy, Politics, and Nurs- ing Practice, and as associate editor of Nursing Outlook. Dr. Berkowitz is an elected fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and an elected member of the IOM. She holds a Ph.D. in nursing science from Case West- ern Reserve University and master of nursing and bachelor of science in nursing degrees from the University of Washington. Her areas of expertise and research include public health systems and health equity. Robert Wm. Blum, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is William H. Gates, Sr. Profes- sor and chair of the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has edited two books and has written nearly 250 journal articles, book chapters, and special reports. Dr. Blum’s research interests include adolescent sexual- ity, chronic illness, and international adolescent health. In July 2007, he was named director of the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute. He is a past president of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, has served on the American Board of Pediatrics, was a charter member of the Sub-Board of Adolescent Medicine, is a past chair of the Alan Guttmacher Institute

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323 APPENDIX D board of directors, and served as chair of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Adolescent Health and Development. He is a consultant to The World Bank and UNICEF, as well as the World Health Organiza- tion, where he has served on the Technical Advisory Group of the Child and Adolescent Health Department, as well as the Scientific and Technical Advisory Group of the Human Reproductive Program. Dr. Blum has been awarded the Society for Adolescent Medicine’s Outstanding Achievement Award (1993), and in 1998 was the recipient of the American Public Health Association’s Herbert Needleman Award “for scientific achievement and courageous advocacy” on behalf of children and youth. He received an M.D. from Howard University College of Medicine, as well as an M.P.H. in maternal and child health and a Ph.D. in health policy at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Blum is an elected a member of the IOM. Walter O. Bockting, Ph.D., is associate professor and coordinator of Trans- gender Health Services, Program in Human Sexuality, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota Medical School. He also is a founding member of the university’s Leo Fung Center for Con- genital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) and Disorders of Sex Development. Dr. Bockting has more than 20 years of direct clinical experience serving the transgender population. Currently, he leads a multidisciplinary team provid- ing tailored health services to transgender children, adolescents, and adults and their families. Dr. Bockting teaches medical students, physicians, and psychologists to work competently with this population. His research has focused on the sexual health of various sexual- and ethnic-minority popula- tions, and has been funded by the American Foundation for AIDS Research, the Minnesota Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and NIH. He currently is conducting a randomized con- trolled trial to study the efficacy of an Internet-based, transgender-specific health promotion intervention. Dr. Bockting has edited five volumes, includ- ing Transgender Health and HIV Prevention (Haworth Press, 2005) and Guidelines for Transgender Care (Haworth Press, 2007), and has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles. He is editor of the International Journal of Transgenderism. A frequent consultant, Dr. Bockting has served on the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Gender Identity, Gender Variance, and Intersex Issues. He is the 2009–2011 president of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health. Judith Bradford, Ph.D., is director of the Center for Population Research in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Health, funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at The Fenway Institute (TFI). She co-chairs TFI with Kenneth Mayer, M.D., and is professor emeritus in the Institute of

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324 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE Women’s Health at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). Since 2001, Dr. Bradford has worked with Fenway Community Health to expand its sexual- and gender-minority health research and to develop TFI as its re- search, provider training and education, and policy division. As associate director/director of the VCU Survey and Evaluation Research Laboratory for 24 years, she built divisions for social and health policy research and for community-based research. During this time, she taught courses, chaired the Health Policy concentration in the Center for Public Policy, and directed doctoral dissertations. Dr. Bradford has participated in LGBT health re- search since 1984, working with public health programs and community- based organizations to conduct studies on sexual and gender minorities and racial minority communities and to translate results into programs to reduce health disparities. She was a committee member for the IOM’s 1997–1999 study of lesbian health research priorities, a founding member of the National Coalition of LGBT Health, and a board member of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. Dr. Bradford has been recognized for her work by a number of organizations, including Mautner Project, the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, the Richmond Healthy Start Initiative, and the Lesbian Health and Research Center. Brian de Vries, Ph.D., is professor of gerontology at San Francisco State University. He received his doctorate in life span developmental psychology from the University of British Columbia in 1988 and was a postdoctoral fellow at both Simon Fraser University in Vancouver and the University of Southern California. He is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and a member of the board of the American Society on Aging and co-chair of its LGBT Aging Issues Network constituent group. Dr. de Vries is editor of the academic journal Sexuality Research and Social Policy; he is former associate editor of The International Journal of Aging and Human Development (2000–2006). He has served as guest editor of Omega: Jour- nal of Death and Dying (1997 and 2004) and as guest co-editor of Gen- erations (2001). In addition, he has edited four books, including Gay and Lesbian Aging (2004). He is currently editing a special issue of the Journal of Homosexuality on community-based needs assessments of LGBT elders. Dr. de Vries has authored or coauthored more than 80 journal articles and book chapters and has made more than 125 presentations to professional audiences on a variety of topics, such as the social and psychological well- being of midlife and older LGBT persons, friendship and social support in the lives of older gay men and lesbians, and end-of-life issues and bereave- ment within LGBT populations. Robert Garofalo, M.D., M.P.H., is director of Adolescent HIV Services at Children’s Memorial Hospital, and associate professor of pediatrics and

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325 APPENDIX D preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medi- cine. Dr. Garofalo received his B.S. from Duke University (1988), his M.D. from New York University School of Medicine (1992), and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health (1999). He completed a pediatric in- ternship and residency at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and then the Dyson Pediatric Advocacy Fellowship and a fellowship in adolescent medi- cine at Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Garofalo’s clinical and academic career has been devoted to community-based health and the care of both HIV-infected adolescents and other at-risk teen popula- tions, such as LGBT youth. He is a past president of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. He has written a number of peer-reviewed articles and other publications on HIV and the health risks facing LGBT youth. Dr. Garofalo is currently the principal investigator for a number of federally funded research projects for HIV-positive adolescents, LGBT youth, and other at-risk youth populations. Gregory M. Herek, Ph.D., is professor of psychology at the University of California, Davis. His work focuses broadly on sexual orientation, HIV/ AIDS, prejudice and stigma, and public policy related to these topics. His empirical research has included studies of sexual prejudice and stigma in the U.S. population and among sexual minorities; the prevalence and psycho- logical sequelae of hate crimes against lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals; and the nature of AIDS-related stigma and its impact on people with HIV/AIDS. A fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Associa- tion for Psychological Science, Dr. Herek received the 1996 APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest and the 2006 Kurt Lewin Memorial Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (APA Division 9). He is the 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues (APA Division 44). His other honors include the 1999 and 1989 awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions from APA Division 44 and the 1992 Outstanding Achieve- ment Award from the APA Committee on Lesbian and Gay Concerns. Dr. Herek is past chairperson of the APA Committee on Lesbian and Gay Concerns. He also served on the APA Task Force on Avoiding Heterosexist Bias in Research and the APA Task Force on AIDS. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of California, Davis, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. Elizabeth A. Howell, M.D., M.P.P., is associate professor in the Depart- ments of Health Evidence and Policy, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Repro- ductive Science, and Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She conducts research on racial/ethnic disparities in health and health

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326 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE care in maternal and child health, barriers to mental health care for low- income women of color, and quality of care. She currently is running two NIH-funded randomized controlled trials aimed at reducing postpartum depression among majority and minority mothers in New York City. Dr. Howell also has conducted studies on racial/ethnic disparities in treatment of cervical cancer, disparities in infant mortality rates in New York City, and quality of care in women’s health. She is a fellow of the American Col- lege of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and currently serves on the ACOG Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women. Dr. Howell received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and her medi- cal and public policy degrees at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She received her residency training at Cornell/New York Hospital and is a board-certified obstetrician gynecolo- gist. Dr. Howell received her training in clinical epidemiology as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale Medical School. Daniel Kasprzyk, Ph.D., is vice president, senior fellow, and director of the Center for Excellence in Survey Research at National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago. Prior to his appointment at NORC, he was director of statistical services at Mathematica Policy Re- search, Inc. Dr. Kasprzyk has more than 25 years of experience in manag- ing large-scale sample surveys in a variety of topic areas, including holding various positions on the staff of the Survey of Income and Program Par- ticipation at the Census Bureau and carrying out methodological research associated with federal survey programs. He has particular expertise in nonsampling error issues in surveys. Prior to his private-sector positions, Dr. Kasprzyk was program director of the elementary and secondary sample survey studies program at the National Center for Education Statistics, where he was responsible for the Schools and Staffing Survey system. He was a member of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and De- velopment committee that, among other responsibilities, developed and reported school and teacher data for cross-country comparisons. He served as the U.S. Department of Education’s liaison to the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Panel to Review the Na- tional Children’s Study Research Plan. Dr. Kasprzyk chaired the American Statistical Association’s (ASA) Sections on Survey Research Methods and on Social Statistics, as well as serving as officer for other sections of the ASA and for the Washington Statistical Society, a Chapter of the ASA. He served for 20 years on the Office of Management and Budget’s Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology; he is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and fellow and former vice president of the ASA. He currently serves as associate editor for the Journal of Official Statistics and

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327 APPENDIX D Survey Methodology. Dr. Kasprzyk received his Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from The George Washington University. Harvey J. Makadon, M.D., is clinical professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of professional education and training at The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, in Boston. He has been a local and na- tional leader in care for vulnerable populations, with a particular focus on LGBT communities and people with HIV/AIDS. He is lead editor of The Fenway Guide to LGBT Health, published by the American College of Physicians in 2007—the first text for health care professionals published on this topic in the United States. Dr. Makadon has written numerous articles and reviews on HIV care and education. He edited a text, HIV, published by the American College of Physicians in April 2000. A third edition was published in 2007. The first Indian edition of the book came out in 2004, with a special focus on care in resource-limited countries. Charlotte J. Patterson, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Psychology and in the Center for Children, Families, and the Law at the University of Vir- ginia. Since receiving her Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University, Dr. Patterson has pursued research on children’s personal and social development in the context of family, peer, and school environments. In recent years, much of her work has focused on child development in lesbian- and gay-parented families. Dr. Patterson has served as director of the Bay Area Families Study, a study of psychosocial development among children who were born to or adopted by lesbian mothers, and as codirector of the Contemporary Families Study, which examined psychosocial adjustment among children born via donor insemination to lesbian and heterosexual parents. Recently, she has worked with data on adolescents with same-sex parents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and has collected new data for a variety of additional studies of sexual-minority families. Dr. Patterson has won a number of awards, including a Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from the Society for Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Issues (APA Division 44); an Outstanding Achievement Award from the APA’s Committee on Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns; and the Carolyn Attneave Diversity Award from APA Division 43 (Family Psychology) for contributions that advance the understanding of diversity and its integration into family psychology. During the 2005–2006 academic year, Dr. Patterson served as president of the Society for Psychological Study of Lesbian and Gay Issues (APA Division 44), and in 2009 she won the APA’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. John L. Peterson, Ph.D., is professor of psychology at Georgia State Uni- versity. He joined the faculty at Georgia State as associate professor in

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328 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE 1994 following his position as a research psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, in the Department of Medicine and the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies. His research expertise focuses on the social determinants and cultural factors associated with racial disparity in HIV infection among African American gay and bisexual men, as well as the social, psychological, and structural determinants of HIV risk reduction in randomized trials. Dr. Peterson has published extensively on HIV/AIDS in the leading behavioral science and public health journals and is coeditor of the Handbook of HIV Prevention. He has served on several editorial boards, including those of the American Journal of Community Psychology and AIDS and Behavior, and has frequently served as an expert consultant to CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS. Dr. Peterson’s expertise also includes research on the perpetration of aggression toward gays and lesbians, with emphasis on the sociocultural and psychological factors that influence ver- bal and physical assaults on lesbians and gay men. Dr. Peterson is a fellow of the APA and the Society for Community Research and Action. He also serves on the NIH Office of AIDS Research, Behavioral and Social Science Planning Group. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan. Caitlin C. Ryan, Ph.D., ACSW, is director of the Family Acceptance Project at the Marian Wright Edelman Institute at San Francisco State University. She is a clinical social worker who has worked on LGBT health and men- tal health since the 1970s and on AIDS since 1982. Dr. Ryan received her clinical training with children and adolescents at Smith College School for Social Work in inpatient and community mental health programs and be- gan her social work career in school-based psychoeducational settings. She pioneered community-based AIDS services at the beginning of the epidemic, initiated the first major study to identify lesbian health needs in the early 1980s, and has worked to implement quality care for LGBT youth since the early 1990s. Dr. Ryan founded the Family Acceptance Project—a research, intervention, and policy initiative—in 2002 to promote family support, decrease risk, and improve well-being for LGBT youth. Her book Lesbian and Gay Youth: Care and Counseling—the first comprehensive guide to health and mental health care for lesbian and gay youth—was written as a follow-up to the federal government’s first conference on the primary care needs of lesbian and gay youth, which she coordinated for the Health Re- sources and Services Administration. Her work has been acknowledged by many groups, including the National Association of People with AIDS. In 1988 she was named Social Worker of the Year by the National Associa- tion of Social Workers for her leadership and contributions on the AIDS epidemic and social change. She was named Researcher of the Year by the Lesbian Health and Research Center at the University of California, San

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329 APPENDIX D Francisco, for her pioneering work in lesbian health. Dr. Ryan also received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the APA, Division 44, for directing critical research on LGBT youth and families. Mark A. Schuster, M.D., Ph.D., is William Berenberg Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and chief of general pediatrics and vice chair for health policy in the Department of Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston. Previously, he held similar positions at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and served as director of health promotion and dis- ease prevention at RAND, where he held the RAND Distinguished Chair in Health Promotion. In addition, he was founding director of the UCLA/ RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion, a prevention research cen- ter funded by CDC. Dr. Schuster has a long history of conducting research on child, adolescent, and family health issues with funding from NIH and CDC. He is also funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Qual- ity to lead the Children’s Hospital Boston Center of Excellence for Quality Measurement. His research has covered wide-ranging topics, including LGBT health and health care, adolescent sexual behavior, HIV prevention, and access to care for people with HIV. He was co-author of Everything You Never Wanted Your Kids to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid They’d Ask): The Secrets to Surviving Your Child’s Sexual Development from Birth to the Teens and co-editor of Child Rearing in America: Challenges Fac- ing Parents of Young Children. Dr. Schuster received his B.A. summa cum laude from Yale, his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, his M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, and his Ph.D. from the Pardee Rand Graduate School. He performed his pediatrics residency at Children’s Hospital Boston and a fellowship with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at UCLA and RAND. He is the 2003 winner of the Nemours Child Health Services Research Award from AcademyHealth for a young investigator and the 2009 winner of the Academic Pediatric Association Research Award for career achievement. Lowell J. Taylor, Ph.D., is professor of economics at the H. John Heinz III College, Carnegie Mellon University. He has been on the Heinz Col- lege faculty since 1990. Dr. Taylor holds an M.A. in statistics and an M.A. in economics from the University of Michigan; he earned his Ph.D. in economics in 1989, also at the University of Michigan. He has taught in the economics department at the University of Texas at Austin and has been a visiting professor in the economics department at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2000 he worked as senior economist for President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers. He also served on the National Research Council Committee to Review the Scientists and Engineers Statis- tical Database System (SESTAT) 2000 Decade Design. Dr. Taylor’s general

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330 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE research interests are labor markets, economic incentives within firms, and economic demography. His papers span a wide range of topics, including the causes of racial disparity in U.S. labor markets, the economics of lesbian and gay families, and the economics of health care delivery. He is co-author of the first paper on the lesbian and gay population ever to appear in the flagship journal Demography. His work has also appeared in leading eco- nomics and statistics journals, including the American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Political Economy, and Journal of the American Statistical Association. Ruth Enid Zambrana, Ph.D., M.S.W., is professor in the Department of Women’s Studies; director of the Consortium on Race, Gender and Eth- nicity; and former interim director of the U.S. Latino Studies Initiative (2007–2009) at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is also ad- junct professor of family medicine at the University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine. Dr. Zambrana’s work focuses on the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and other contextual variables in health disparities and social inequality, with an emphasis on Latino populations. Her emerging scholarship is on racial/ethnic inequalities in women’s health, knowledge production, and public policy. Co-authored books include Health Issues in the Latino Com- munity (2001); Drawing from the Data: Working Effectively with Latino Families (2003); and an anthology (2008) entitled Emerging Intersections: Race, Class, and Gender in Theory, Policy, and Practice. She has published extensively in her field and has served on several editorial boards, includ- ing those of the American Journal of Public Health and Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. She has served on several national and state boards and committees and as a member of the CDC Agenda Com- mittee, Office of Public Health Research, Health Information Services and Health Equity Champions Workgroups (2005) and the State of Maryland Governor’s Transition Task Force on Higher Education (2006). She received her Ph.D. in sociology from Boston University and her M.S.W. from the University of Pennsylvania. Study Staff Monica N. Feit, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a senior program officer at the IOM. Prior to joining the IOM, Dr. Feit spent a year as the American Public Health As- sociation’s government fellow, working for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions on the Subcommittee on Children and Fami- lies. She received her M.P.H. from Columbia University and her Ph.D. from London South Bank University and has a broad background in public health and extensive experience in international health. She has worked with a

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331 APPENDIX D variety of nongovernmental organizations in Niger, as country director of Project HOPE in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and with the Medical Research Coun- cil of South Africa in its Environment and Health Research Unit. Joshua Joseph, J.D., is an associate program officer with the IOM’s Board on the Health of Select Populations. He received his J.D. from American University’s Washington College of Law in 2008 and is licensed to practice law in New York and New Jersey. Within the legal field, he has performed a variety of research and writing tasks, assisted indigent clients as a pro bono attorney, and worked on policy issues and regulatory affairs. He received his B.A. in economics with a minor in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. His current interests include public health, health policy, and regulatory law. Jon Q. Sanders is a veteran program associate with the Board on the Health of Select Populations at the IOM. He received his B.A. in anthropology with a minor in geosciences from Trinity University and recently completed the program management certification at George Mason University. In his 10 years with the National Academies, Mr. Sanders has worked on a variety of projects on topics ranging from childhood obesity to national security. He is coauthor of Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts (2001). His research interests include public health, emergency management, and environmental decision making. Karen Anderson, Ph.D., is senior program officer in the IOM. She is re- sponsible for the Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities. She earned a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Pittsburgh. Her professional experience includes a range of positions involving the intersection of social science and public health research and public policy, including positions with the U.S. House of Representatives, the APA, and Howard University. Dr. Anderson is an adjunct professor of pediatrics in the college of medicine at Howard University. She has expertise in child health disparities, adolescent develop- ment, reproductive health issues, HIV/AIDS, LGBT issues, early childhood education and development, and education policy. Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, M.P.H., M.D., is currently director of the Board on the Health of Select Populations and the Medical Follow-up Agency at the IOM. Prior to joining the IOM he was a career military physician in the U.S. Army. While in the military, he served as chief of several large departments of preventive medicine at U.S. installations at home and overseas. He also was commander of the military community hospital at Ft. Carson, Colorado, and later served as hospital commander

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332 THE HEALTH OF LGBT PEOPLE for the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He had several assignments at the Army Surgeon General’s Office, working on military health care poli- cies. He received his undergraduate degree from Bucknell University and an M.P.H. from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a graduate of Temple University Medical School and is board certified in the specialty of preventive medicine. Sarah Isquick is a third-year medical student at Case Western Reserve Uni- versity School of Medicine. She received a B.S. in English literature from the University of Michigan. She contributed to the report as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies. Upon receiving her M.D., she aspires to identify and redress health dispari- ties by conducting outcomes-based research and working in policy. Some of her passions include LGBT health, reproductive and sexual health, and patient safety. At Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, she works to educate other students and faculty by organizing lectures and film screenings on relevant issues in medicine, as well as advocacy events and letter writing campaigns.