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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Thomas M. Cook (Co-Chair) is former president of SABRE Decision Technologies, where he was responsible for a 2,700-person consulting and software development company specializing in providing solutions to the travel and transportation industry. He has served as chairman and CEO of CALEB Technologies Corporation, president of T.C.I. Consulting, and senior counselor at McKinsey and Company. In his career at AMR Corporation, he was director of operations research for American Airlines, from which SABRE emerged as a separate entity. He has also held positions at the University of Tulsa and Arthur Young and Company. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995 for leadership in advancing operations research within the transportation industry and has served as president of the Institute of Management Sciences and the Institute of Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He holds a master’s degree in business administration from Southern Methodist University and a Ph.D. in operations research from the University of Texas.


Janet L. Norwood (Co-Chair) served as U.S. Commissioner of Labor Statistics from 1979 to 1992. She has served as a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, a director and vice-chair of the board of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, and as counselor and senior fellow at the Conference Board. At the National Research Council, she has served on numerous study panels and chaired the Panel to Review the 2000 Census and the Panel on Statistical Programs of the Bureau of



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–C– Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Thomas M. Cook (Co-Chair) is former president of SABRE Decision Tech- nologies, where he was responsible for a 2,700-person consulting and software development company specializing in providing solutions to the travel and transportation industry. He has served as chairman and CEO of CALEB Technologies Corporation, president of T.C.I. Consulting, and senior counselor at McKinsey and Company. In his career at AMR Corpo- ration, he was director of operations research for American Airlines, from which SABRE emerged as a separate entity. He has also held positions at the University of Tulsa and Arthur Young and Company. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1995 for leadership in advanc- ing operations research within the transportation industry and has served as president of the Institute of Management Sciences and the Institute of Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He holds a master’s degree in business administration from Southern Methodist Uni- versity and a Ph.D. in operations research from the University of Texas. Janet L. Norwood (Co-Chair) served as U.S. Commissioner of Labor Statis- tics from 1979 to 1992. She has served as a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, a director and vice-chair of the board of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, and as counselor and senior fellow at the Conference Board. At the National Research Council, she has served on numerous study panels and chaired the Panel to Review the 2000 Census and the Panel on Statistical Programs of the Bureau of 39

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40 CHANGE AND THE 2020 CENSUS: NOT WHETHER BUT HOW Transportation Statistics (BTS); she is also a past member of the Committee on National Statistics and the Division of Engineering and Physical Sciences. She is a member of advisory committees at the National Science Founda- tion, at several statistical agencies, and at universities, and has chaired the advisory committee for BTS. She has received honorary L.L.D. degrees from Carnegie Mellon, Florida International, Harvard, and Rutgers Universities. She is a fellow and past president of the American Statistical Association, a member and past vice president of the International Statistical Institute, an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and the National Association of Business Economists. She has a B.A. degree from Rutgers University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University. Jack Baker is senior research scientist in the Geospatial and Population Studies Program at the University of New Mexico. Since 2006, he has represented New Mexico in the Federal-State Cooperative Programs on Population Estimates (FSCPE) and Population Projections (FSCPP). He par- ticipated extensively in preparations for the 2010 census, with an emphasis on Master Address File improvement efforts including the 2010 Local Up- date of Census Addresses (LUCA) program and the 2010 Count Review Program (chairing the FSCPE committee that focused on redesigning this process and as a consultant to the Bureau on use of GIS technology to per- form the review). He continues to serve on numerous FSCPE committees. His scientific research focuses primarily on methods for modeling small area populations using incomplete data, geospatial demographic methods, historical demography, and biodemography. He received a B.A. degree from the University of North Dakota and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of New Mexico, all in anthropology. Warren Brown is senior public service associate and director of the applied demography program at the Carl Vinson Institute of Government at the University of Georgia; the applied demographic program is charged with providing demographic population estimates and projections for the state of Georgia, in partnership with the state Office of Planning and Budget. Previ- ously, he was director of the Program on Applied Demographics at Cornell University, in which capacity he was responsible for producing population estimates and projections for the state of New York. He has represented New York in the Census Bureau’s Federal-State Cooperative Programs for Population Estimates and Population Projections, serving as chair of the population estimates group. He also served on the Population Association of America’s Committee on Challenges to Population Estimates, Advisory Committee on the Demographic Full Count Review, and Committee on

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APPENDIX C 41 Applied Demography. At Cornell, he also served as research director of the university’s Census Research Data Center. He received a B.A. in religious studies from the University of Virginia, an M.A. in sociology from the New School for Social Research, and a Ph.D. in development sociology from Cornell University. Donald Cooke is community mapping evangelist at Esri in Redlands, Cali- fornia. He was a member of the 1967 Census Bureau team that developed the Dual Independent Map Encoding (DIME) topological approach to a spatial database as part of the New Haven Census Use Project. The DIME methodology was a key predecessor to the Census Bureau’s Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) system and of the modern geographic information systems industry. In 1980 he founded Geographic Data Technology, Inc. (GDT), with which the Census Bureau contracted to digitize the original TIGER data files. GDT was acquired by Tele Atlas in 2004, and he was chief scientist at Tele Atlas North America through February 2010. He received the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association’s Horwood award in 2004 and Esri’s lifetime achieve- ment award in 2007. At the National Research Council, he has served on the Mapping Science Committee. He is a graduate of Yale University and stud- ied civil engineering systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Daniel L. Cork (study director) is a senior program officer for the Commit- tee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director of the Panel to Review the 2010 Census. He joined the CNSTAT staff in 2000 and has served as study director or program officer for several census panels, including the Panels on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Research on Future Census Methods (2010 Planning panel), and Review of the 2000 Census. He also directed the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics (in cooperation with the Committee on Law and Justice) and was senior program officer for the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database (joint with the Committee on Law and Justice and the National Materials Advisory Board). His research interests include quantitative criminology, geographical analy- sis, Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He has a B.S. in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Ivan P. Fellegi is chief statistician emeritus of Canada, having served as chief statistician from 1985 to 2008. He joined Statistics Canada (then the Dominion Bureau of Statistics) in 1957, serving as director of sampling research and consultation and director general of methodology and systems, assistant chief statistician, and deputy chief statistician before his appoint-

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42 CHANGE AND THE 2020 CENSUS: NOT WHETHER BUT HOW ment as chief statistician. He has published extensively in the areas of census and survey methodology, in particular on consistent editing rules and record linkage. A past chair of the Conference of European Statisticians of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, he is an honorary mem- ber and past president of the International Statistical Institute, an honorary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians, and past president and Gold Medal recipient of the Statistical Society of Canada. He was made Member of the Order of Canada in 1992 and promoted to Officer in 1998 and has received the nation’s Outstanding Achievement Award; he has also provided advice on statistical matters to his native Hungary following its transition to democracy and, in 2004, was awarded the Order of Merit of the Republic of Hungary. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Privacy and Confidentiality as Factors in Survey Response, the Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond, the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology, and the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. He has a B.Sc. from the University of Budapest and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in survey methodology from Carleton University. Arthur M. Geoffrion is James A. Collins professor of management emeritus (recalled) at the University of California, Los Angeles, Anderson School of Management. The author of more than 60 published works ranging from mathematical programming to the implications of the digital economy for management science, he has consulted extensively on applications of optimization to problems of distribution, production, and capital budget- ing. In 1978 he co-founded INSIGHT, Inc., a management consulting firm specializing in optimization-based applications in supply-chain management and production. In 1982, he founded what is now the Management Science Roundtable, an organization composed of the leaders of operations research groups in 50–60 companies. His editorial service includes eight years as department editor (mathematical programming and Networks) of Manage- ment Science. He has served as the president of the Institute of Management Sciences and received that institute’s distinguished service medal; he is also a fellow and past president of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences and recipient of its George E. Kimball Medal. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.M.E. and his M.I.E. at Cornell University, and his Ph.D. at Stanford University. Susan Hanson is research professor in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University and has previously served as the school’s director. An urban geographer, her current research focuses on understanding how gen-

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APPENDIX C 43 der, geographic opportunity structures, and geographic rootedness affect entrepreneurship in cities, as well as on understanding the emergence of sustainable versus unsustainable practices in urban areas. Prior to joining the Clark faculty, she held faculty appointments at Middlebury College and the State University of New York at Buffalo. She has served as editor of Economic Geography, the Annals of the Association of American Geogra- phers, Urban Geography, and The Professional Geographer, and has been on the editorial boards of numerous other journals. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2000; she is a past president of and was awarded lifetime achievement honors by the Association of American Ge- ographers and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has served on several National Research Council panels and committees, including the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel on Measuring Business Formation, Dynamics, and Performance. She has a B.A. in geography from Middlebury College and a Ph.D. in geography from Northwestern University. Michael D. Larsen is associate professor of statistics and member of the faculty of the Biostatistics Center at George Washington University. Previ- ously, he was associate professor of statistics at Iowa State University. He has served as executive editor of CHANCE magazine, and as associate editor of the Annals of Applied Statistics, the Journal of Statistics Education, and the Journal of Official Statistics. He has served on the Census Advisory Committee of the American Statistical Association. He received his B.A. in mathematics and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Harvard University. George T. Ligler is a private consultant in Potomac, Maryland. He has ex- tensive experience in information management and software and computer system engineering, as is evident from his work at Burroughs Corporation (1980–1982), Computer Sciences Corporation (1984–1988), and at GTL Associates, a private company that he founded. At the National Research Council, he served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board’s Committee to Review the Tax Systems Modernization of the Inter- nal Revenue Service. He also served as a member of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods (2010 census planning), and was a member of the expert committee separately formed by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce to advise on options for the Census Bureau’s replan of its Field Data Col- lection Automation Contract in early 2008. A Rhodes scholar, he received his B.S. in mathematics from Furman University in 1971 and his M.Sc. and D.Phil. from Oxford University.

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44 CHANGE AND THE 2020 CENSUS: NOT WHETHER BUT HOW Nathaniel Schenker is associate director for research and methodology at the National Center for Health Statistics, having previously served as senior scientist. He is also adjunct professor in the Joint Program in Sur- vey Methodology administered by the University of Maryland, University of Michigan, and Westat. Prior to that he was associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles, and prior to that he was a mathematical statistician at the Bureau of the Census. His research interests include handling incomplete data, census and survey methods, survival analysis, statistical computation, and applications of statistics to the health and social sciences. He is a past vice president and past board member of the American Statistical Association. He also served as program chair of the Joint Statistical Meetings, and he was editor of a special section of the Journal of the American Statistical Association entitled “Undercount in the 1990 Census.” At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies. He re- ceived the Roger Herriot Award for Innovation in Federal Statistics from the American Statistical Association, he is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and he is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received his A.B. in statistics from Princeton, and his S.M. and Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Chicago. Judith A. Seltzer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin– Madison, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests in- clude kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other poli- cies affect family change. She was part of a cross-university consortium to develop new models for explaining family change and variation and a member of the design team for the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. At the National Research Council, she has served on the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census and the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. She has master’s and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan. C. Matthew Snipp is Burnet C. and Milfred Finley Wohlford professor of sociology at Stanford University. At Stanford, he is currently serving as director of the Secure Data Center of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences and of the Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity; he is also on the faculty of the Native American Studies program. He has written extensively on American Indians and has written specifically on the interaction of American Indians and the U.S. census. He has served on the Census Bureau’s Technical Advisory Committee on Racial and Ethnic

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APPENDIX C 45 Statistics and the Native American Population Advisory Committee. Prior to moving to Stanford, he was associate professor and professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he held affiliate appointments with several other units, and assistant and associate profes- sor of sociology at the University of Maryland. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods (2010 census planning) and the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census. He received his A.B. in sociology from the University of California, Davis, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. John H. Thompson is president of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago. Prior to his appointment as president, he was executive vice president for survey operations, in which capacity he provided oversight and direction for NORC’s Economics, Labor Force, and Demography Research Department and the Statistics and Methodology Department. He also served as project director for the National Immuniza- tion Survey, conducted on behalf of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from November 2004 through July 2006. He joined NORC following a 27-year career at the U.S. Census Bureau, culminating in service as principal associate director for programs. As associate director for decen- nial census (1997–2001) and chief of the Decennial Management Division (1995–1997), he was the chief operating officer of the 2000 census, over- seeing all aspects of census operations. In this capacity, he also chaired the Bureau’s Executive Steering Committee for Accuracy and Coverage Evalu- ation Policy, an internal working group tasked to provide guidance to the director of the Census Bureau and the secretary of commerce concerning statistical adjustment of 2000 census figures. He has received a Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive and Gold, Silver, and Bronze Medals from the U.S. Department of Commerce. At the NRC, he served on the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Ex- periments. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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