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Speaker Biographical Sketches

Hortensia Amaro, Ph.D., is distinguished professor of health sciences and of counseling psychology and associate dean at the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research. Dr. Amaro’s research has focused on alcohol and drug use and addiction among adolescents and adults; the development and testing of behavioral interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention; substance abuse and mental health treatment for Latina and African American women and incarcerated men; alcohol and drug use among college populations; and behavioral interventions for HIV medications adherence. Her 1995 article “Love, Sex and Power” (American Psychologist) was a signal contribution to the field of HIV prevention among women and received the 1996 Scientific Publication Award from the National Association of Women in Psychology. Dr. Amaro has served on the editorial board of the American Journal of Public Health and other leading publications, and on several Institute of Medicine committees. Additionally, she has served on review and advisory committees to the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bringing her research to the frontlines, Dr. Amaro has founded five substance abuse treatment programs for women in Boston and, for 14 years, served on the board of the Boston Public Health Commission. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Frances E. Ashe-Goins, R.N., M.P.H., a registered nurse and policy analyst, is acting director of the Office of Women’s Health at the U.S. Department



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B Speaker Biographical Sketches Hortensia Amaro, Ph.D., is distinguished professor of health sciences and of counseling psychology and associate dean at the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University and director of the Institute on Urban Health Research. Dr. Amaro’s research has focused on alcohol and drug use and addiction among adolescents and adults; the development and test- ing of behavioral interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention; substance abuse and mental health treatment for Latina and African American women and incarcerated men; alcohol and drug use among college populations; and behavioral interventions for HIV medications adherence. Her 1995 article “Love, Sex and Power” (American Psychologist) was a signal contribu- tion to the field of HIV prevention among women and received the 1996 Scientific Publication Award from the National Association of Women in Psychology. Dr. Amaro has served on the editorial board of the American Journal of Public Health and other leading publications, and on several Institute of Medicine committees. Additionally, she has served on review and advisory committees to the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. De- partment of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bringing her research to the frontlines, Dr. Amaro has founded five substance abuse treatment programs for women in Boston and, for 14 years, served on the board of the Boston Public Health Com- mission. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Frances E. Ashe-Goins, R.N., M.P.H., a registered nurse and policy analyst, is acting director of the Office of Women’s Health at the U.S. Department 192

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193 APPENDIX B of Health and Human Services. Formerly, as deputy director and director of the Division of Policy and Program Development, she was responsible for numerous women’s health issues, including HIV/AIDS, domestic vio- lence, rape/sexual assault, lupus, diabetes, organ/tissue donation, minority women’s health, international health, female genital cutting, mental health, homelessness, and young women’s health. Mrs. Ashe-Goines also coordi- nated the regional women’s health coordinators programs. She has written numerous articles, appeared on radio and television programs, been fea- tured in magazine and newspaper articles, made presentations at national and international conferences and workshops, and received many awards and commendations. She is a featured author of a chapter on domestic violence in the book, Policy and Politics in Nursing and Health Care, 4th edition. Gary Barker, Ph.D., M.P.P., is director of gender, violence, and rights at the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). In this role he over- sees ICRW’s research, policy analyses, and programmatic work to develop solutions that address the underlying causes that lead to violence against women, including the involvement of men and boys. Dr. Barker is a social scientist with more than 15 years of experience researching gender equality, men and masculinities, sexuality, and HIV/AIDS. He also is an expert in exploring the links between men and violence in conflict and post-conflict settings in parts of Latin America, the Caribbean, sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia. Prior to joining ICRW, Dr. Barker was founding executive direc- tor of Instituto Promundo, a nongovernmental organization based in Brazil that works to promote gender equality and reduce violence against children, youth, and women. He also has served as a consultant to the World Bank and many United Nations agencies. Dr. Barker was elected as an Ashoka Fellow in 2007 and awarded an Individual Projects Fellowship from the Open Society Institute. He is a founding co-chair of MenEngage, a global alliance of international organizations that work to engage men and boys to promote gender equality. David Butler-Jones, M.D., M.H.Sc., Canada’s first chief public health of- ficer, heads the Public Health Agency of Canada, which leads the govern- ment’s efforts to protect and promote the health and safety of Canadians. He has worked in many parts of Canada in both public health and clinical medicine and has consulted in a number of other countries. In addition to serving as chief public health officer, Dr. Butler-Jones is a professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba as well as a clinical professor with the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Medicine. From 1995 to 2002 he was chief medical health officer and executive director of the Population

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194 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN Health and Primary Health Services Branches for the Province of Saskatch- ewan. He has served as president of the Canadian Public Health Associa- tion, vice president of the American Public Health Association, chair of the Canadian Roundtable on Health and Climate Change, international regent on the board of the American College of Preventive Medicine, member of the governing council for the Canadian Population Health Initiative, chair of the National Coalition on Enhancing Preventive Practices of Health Professionals, and co-chair of the Canadian Coalition for Public Health in the 21st Century. Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N., is the Anna D. Wolf Chair in Nursing at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Dr. Campbell’s research addresses the risk factors for and the evaluation of interventions to prevent domestic violence. She has authored numerous articles on intimate partner violence, violence against women, and adolescent exposure to violence. Dr. Campbell has served on the National Institute of Mental Health Violence and Trau- matic Stress Study Section and is a member of the American Academy of Nursing and the Institute of Medicine. She has been selected as the Simon Visiting Scholar at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom and, most recently, the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nurs- ing/American Nursing Foundation Scholar in Residence. Dr. Campbell has been active in the Institute of Medicine as a member of the Board on Global Health and has served as a member of two committees of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Claire Crooks, Ph.D., is associate director of the Centre for Prevention Science at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and adjunct profes- sor at the University of Western Ontario. She is one of the lead developers and researchers of the Fourth R, a relationship-based program aimed at preventing violence and related risk behaviors in adolescents that has been implemented in more than 1,000 schools in Canada and the United States. Dr. Crooks is also a co-founder of the Caring Dads program, a parenting intervention for men who have maltreated their children. In addition to being an author of the program manual, she has been involved with train- ing, consultation, and research on the Caring Dads project. Dr. Crooks has co-authored more than 40 articles, chapters, and books on topics including children’s exposure to domestic violence, child custody and access, child maltreatment, adolescent dating violence and risk behavior, intervening with fathers who maltreat their children, strength-based programming for Aboriginal youth, and trauma. She is actively involved with training judges, lawyers, and other court personnel through her work as a faculty member for the U.S. National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Dr. Crooks has testified before the Canadian Senate Committee on Human

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195 APPENDIX B Rights about the intersection between domestic violence and child custody as a children’s rights issue. Sarah Degnan Kambou, Ph.D., is president of the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), a global think tank that focuses on mak- ing women integral to alleviating poverty worldwide. An accomplished social scientist and development practitioner with expertise in sexual and reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, and adolescent programming, Dr. Degnan Kambou has worked in 26 countries and dedicated more than 25 years to creating meaningful social change in the developing world. Prior to being named president, she served as ICRW’s chief operating officer, and earlier, as ICRW’s vice president of health and development, she oversaw research in HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and nutrition as well as in gender, violence, and women’s rights. In 2010 Dr. Degnan Kambou was appointed by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to represent ICRW on the U.S. National Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Dr. Degnan Kambou joined ICRW after more than a decade living in sub-Saharan Africa, where she managed signature programs for CARE, a humanitarian relief and development organization. Prior to her work in Africa, Dr. Degnan Kambou cofounded and for eight years served as a director of the Center for International Health in the School of Public Health at Boston University. Jeffrey L. Edleson, Ph.D., is professor and director of research at the Uni- versity of Minnesota School of Social Work and director of the Minnesota Center Against Violence and Abuse. He is one of the world’s leading au- thorities on children exposed to domestic violence and has published more than 100 articles and 10 books on domestic violence, groupwork, and pro- gram evaluation. Dr. Edleson is co-author, with the late Susan Schechter, of Effective Intervention in Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment Cases: Guidelines for Policy and Practice (NCJFCJ, 1999). Better known as the “Greenbook,” this best-practices guide has been the subject of six feder- ally funded and numerous other demonstration sites across the country. Dr. Edleson also has conducted intervention research and provided techni- cal assistance to domestic violence programs and research projects across North America as well as in several countries in other parts of the world. Dr. Edleson’s research, policy, and practice interests have earlier focused on research on batterer intervention programs. In recent years, his work has focused primarily on the impact of adult domestic violence on children and how social systems respond to these children. Dr. Edleson is an associ- ate editor of the journal Violence Against Women and has served on the editorial boards of numerous other journals. He is co-editor of the Oxford University Press book series on interpersonal violence. He is a licensed

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196 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN independent clinical social worker in Minnesota and has practiced in el- ementary and secondary schools and in several domestic violence agencies. Roger D. Fallot, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and director of research and evaluation at Community Connections, a private, not-for-profit agency providing a full range of human services in the District of Columbia. Dr. Fallot’s professional areas of specialization include the development and evaluation of services for trauma survivors and the role of spirituality in recovery. The author of numerous clinical and research articles, he is a contributing author and co-editor, with Maxine Harris, of Using Trauma Theory to Design Service Systems (Jossey-Bass, 2001) and consults widely on the development of trauma-informed cultures of care in human services. A member of the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Advisory Committee for Women’s Services, Dr. Fallot was principal investigator on the District of Columbia Trauma Collaboration Study, a SAMHSA-funded research project examining the effectiveness of integrated services for women trauma survivors with men- tal health and substance abuse problems. He and a group of clinicians at Community Connections have developed a men’s version of the Trauma Recovery and Empowerment Model, a manualized group intervention for working with survivors of physical and sexual abuse. Dr. Fallot also is interested in the relationships among spirituality, recovery, and well-being; he edited and contributed chapters to Spirituality and Religion in Recovery from Mental Illness (Jossey-Bass, 1998). Julian D. Ford, Ph.D., is professor of psychiatry at the University of Con- necticut School of Medicine and director of the University of Connecticut Health Center Child Trauma Clinic and Center for Trauma Response Recovery and Preparedness. Dr. Ford developed the TARGET (Trauma Affect Regulation: Guide for Education and Therapy) intervention model for adult, adolescent, and child traumatic stress disorders and co-occurring substance use disorders. He conducts research on psychotherapy and family therapy, health services utilization, psychometric screening and assessment, and psychiatric epidemiology, including serving as the principal investi- gator on several federally funded studies evaluating TARGET and other evidence-based psychosocial interventions for families, adults, and youth. Dr. Ford has co-edited three recent books, Treating Traumatized Children (Routledge, 2008, with Danny Brom and Ruth Pat-Horenczyk), Encyclo- pedia of Psychological Trauma (Wiley, 2008, with Gilbert Reyes and Jon Elhai), and Treatment of Complex Traumatic Stress Disorders (Guilford, 2009, with Christine Courtois), and authored a textbook, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Scientific and Professional Dimensions (Elsevier/Academic Press, 2009).

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197 APPENDIX B Claudia García-Moreno, M.D., M.Sc., is a physician from Mexico with more than 25 years of experience in public health spanning Africa, Latin America, and parts of Asia. For the past 15 years her work has focused on women’s health and gender in health, including contributing to gender and women’s health initiatives at the World Health Organization (WHO). She has led WHO’s work on women and HIV/AIDS and on violence against women and coordinated the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence Against Women, which includes more than 14 countries. She has been involved in setting up several initiatives such as the Sexual Violence Research Initiative. She is on the editorial board of Reproductive Health Matters and has published and reviewed papers on women’s health for several international journals. Kathy Greenlee, J.D., was appointed by President Obama as the fourth assistant secretary for aging at the Administration on Aging (AoA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and confirmed by the Senate in June 2009. Ms. Greenlee brings more than 10 years of experience advancing the health and independence of older persons and their families and advocating for the rights of older persons. AoA is mandated by the Older Americans Act (OAA) to be the focal point and lead advocacy agency for older persons and their concerns at the federal level. AoA’s vision for older people, embodied in the OAA, is based on the value that dignity is inherent to all individuals and the belief that older people should have the opportunity to fully participate in all aspects of society and community life; be able to maintain their health and independence; and be free from vio- lence, abuse, neglect, and exploitation. AoA works with its partners at the federal, state, and community levels to help strengthen the nation’s capacity to promote the dignity and independence of older people. AoA works to stimulate programmatic and policy activity at the national, state, and local levels in order to advance the work of eliminating violence against older adults and elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation in the United States as well as with international organizations and researchers around the world. By doing so, AoA seeks to address the social, economic, and health impacts of violence against older adults and elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Rachel Jewkes, M.D., is director of the Medical Research Council’s Gender and Health Research Unit in Pretoria, South Africa. A public health physi- cian, epidemiologist, and social researcher, she has spent the past 15 years re- searching the interface of gender inequity and gender-based violence and their intersections with health, particularly concerning HIV. She has spent many years developing the health sector response to rape in South Africa through research and policy development. She is secretary of the Sexual Violence Research Initiative of the Global Forum for Health Research and member of

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198 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN the World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Advisory Panel on Injury and Violence Prevention and Control, WHO’s Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee for HIV–AIDS, and the PEPFAR scientific advisory board. She has published articles on intimate partner violence and HIV in numerous international journals, including The Lancet and the British Medical Journal. Julia Kim, M.D., M.Sc., is the cluster leader for universal access and the Millennium Development Goals in the HIV/AIDS group of the United Na- tions Development Programme (UNDP). She is an internal medicine special- ist and public health researcher by training. Prior to joining UNDP, she was based in South Africa for 10 years, where she held joint appointments as a senior researcher and policy advisor within the School of Public Health at the University of the Witwatersrand and the Health Policy Unit of the Lon- don School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Her research interests have included program and policy innovation to address gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS at multiple levels, including in the health, education, and criminal justice sectors. Dr. Kim’s recent work has included intervention research on structural drivers of HIV, including the potential of strategies such as microfinance to address the intersections between poverty, gender inequalities, and HIV. She has served on numerous national and global advisory groups and published across a range of issues, including gender and development, HIV post-exposure prophylaxis, integrating reproduc- tive health and HIV/AIDS, HIV/tuberculosis clinical services, rural health systems development, strengthening research utilization, and addressing social determinants of health. James L. Lang is program coordinator of Partners for Prevention, the regional joint program of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Population Fund, UN Women, and UN Vol- unteers for the primary prevention of gender-based violence in Asia and the Pacific. Mr. Lang is a development practitioner, trainer, and author with special interests in gender-based violence prevention and engaging boys and men in working toward gender equality. He has worked on these is- sues for the United Nations family and nonprofit organizations since 1997. Previously, Mr. Lang served as the UNDP’s regional gender advisor for the Asia-Pacific region and worked for UNDP in Laos and Sri Lanka. He has also worked with the Family Violence Prevention Fund in San Francisco, Oxfam Great Britain in the United Kingdom, and served as research coor- dinator for the UN International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women and UNDP in New York. In addition to project management and training, Mr. Lang has published numerous articles, and edited books on the topics of poverty, men and gender, gender-based vio- lence prevention, and other development issues.

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199 APPENDIX B Judy Langford, M.S.Ed., is senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy in Washington, D.C., where she provides technical assistance to foundations, governmental agencies, and private organizations on the development and implementation of family supportive practices and poli- cies. She is currently leading the national implementation of Strengthen- ing Families through Early Care and Education, funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Finance Project and the Southern Institute for Children and Families. Ms. Langford is former executive director of both the Family Resource Coalition and the Ounce of Prevention Fund. She has served as a consul- tant for the Pew Trusts Children’s Initiative, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, and the Casey Family Programs. She has served as chair of the Illinois Family Policy Task Force and member of the Illinois Child Welfare Advisory Board. Ms. Langford was previously an award-winning contributing editor for Redbook magazine and served as honorary chair of President Carter’s Advisory Committee for Women from 1977 to 1981. Additionally, she was a founder of the AIDS Foundation of Chicago and a fellow of Leadership Greater Chicago. Brigid McCaw, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., is medical director for the Family Violence Prevention Program at Kaiser Permanente (KP). Her teaching, research, and publications focus on developing a health systems response to intimate partner violence and the impact of intimate partner violence on health status and mental health. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Kaiser Permanente, a large nonprofit integrated health care organization serving 8.6 million members in nine states and the District of Columbia, has implemented one of the most comprehensive health care responses to domestic violence in the United States. The nationally rec- ognized “systems model” approach is available across the continuum of care, including outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care; advice and call centers; and chronic care programs. The electronic medical record includes clinician tools to facilitate recognition, referrals, resources, and follow-up for patients experiencing domestic violence and provides data for quality improvement measures. Over the past decade, identification of domestic violence has increased fivefold, with most members identified in the ambu- latory rather than acute-care settings. The majority of identified patients receive follow-up mental health services. Kaiser Permanente also provides prevention, outreach, and domestic violence resources for its workforce. Violence prevention is an important focus for KP community benefit invest- ments and research studies. The KP program, under the leadership of Dr. McCaw, has received several national awards.

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200 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN Margarita Quintanilla, M.P.H., is currently the country representative of PATH in Nicaragua. Previously, she was coordinator of the Child Domes- tic Work and Sexual Exploitation Programs of the International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor. She has worked with the Ministry of Health of Nicaragua and the Finnish Foreign Affairs Ministry, where she was responsible for the project component on policies and legislation for women’s health. Dr. Quintanilla is author of several publications on gender- based violence in the health sector including Comprehensive Response to Domestic Violence in the Health Services: Care Manual for Health Per- sonnel; Medico-Legal Care in Cases of Sexual Assault in Nicaragua; and Assessment of the Evidence Gathering, Submission, and Consideration Procedures in Cases of Intra-Family and Sexual Violence against Women, Children and Adolescents in Nicaragua (co-author). Lynn Rosenthal is the first-ever White House advisor on violence against women. She works with Vice President Joseph Biden and the White House Council on Women and Girls to coordinate efforts across federal agencies to address domestic violence and sexual assault. Her areas of focus since as- suming this post include increasing resources in the federal budget, chairing the Interagency Policy Group on Violence Against Women, and coordinating with other White House offices to integrate these issues into other adminis- tration priorities. Previously, Ms. Rosenthal served as executive director of the National Network to End Domestic Violence, where she worked on the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act and assisted states and local communities with implementation of this groundbreaking federal legis- lation. She also worked closely with corporate partners to bring funding to local communities to respond to domestic violence. Ms. Rosenthal has been widely recognized for her efforts to address domestic violence at the national, state, and local levels. She has been a shelter director and leader of state domestic violence coalitions in Florida and New Mexico. In 2006, she was the first recipient of the Sheila Wellstone Institute National Advocacy Award. Judith A. Salerno, M.D., M.S., was appointed executive officer of the Insti- tute of Medicine of The National Academies in January 2008. From 2001 to 2007, Dr. Salerno served as deputy director of the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In this capacity, Dr. Salerno had oversight of more than $1 billion in aging research conducted and supported annually by the institute, including research on Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases, frailty and function in late life, and the social, behavioral, and demographic aspects of aging. A geriatrician, Dr. Salerno is interested in improving the health and well-being of older persons and has designed public–private ini- tiatives to address aging stereotypes, novel approaches to support training

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201 APPENDIX B of new investigators in aging, and award-winning programs to commu- nicate health and research advances to the public. Dr. Salerno also serves on numerous boards and national committees concerned with health care issues ranging from the quality of care in long-term care to the future of the geriatric workforce. Bryan Samuels, M.P.P., is commissioner of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families and has spent his career formulating service delivery in- novations and streamlining operations in large government organizations on behalf of children, youth, and families. His commitment to public service is largely motivated by his own success in overcoming great personal hardship during his 11.5 years of growing up in a residential school for disadvantaged children. This experience helped shape his commitment to serve children who lived in foster care and reinforced his belief that dedicated people and well-designed programs can make a dramatic impact on the lives of at-risk youth. As chief of staff for Chicago Public Schools, Mr. Samuels played a leadership role in managing the day-to-day operations of the third largest school system in the nation. Prior to this role, he served as director of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, where he moved aggres- sively to implement comprehensive assessments of all children entering care, redesigned transitional and independent living programs to prepare youth for transitioning to adulthood, created a child location unit to track all run- away youth, and introduced evidence-based services to address the impact of trauma and exposure to violence on children in state care. Mr. Samuels has taught at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration and also has provided technical assistance to state and local governments to improve human service delivery to vulnerable populations. Kiersten Stewart is director of public policy and advocacy for the Fam- ily Violence Prevention Fund and manages its Washington, DC, office. In that capacity she advocates on behalf of abused women and children and works to prevent violence in our homes and communities here and around the world. Prior to joining the fund’s Washington, DC, office, she was the chief of staff to U.S. Rep. Maurice Hinchey, handling his legislative work around women’s issues, HIV/AIDS, civil rights, immigration, and poverty and managing his successful 1998 campaign. Cris M. Sullivan, Ph.D., is professor of ecological/community psychology and director of the Violence Against Women Research and Outreach Ini- tiative at Michigan State University (MSU). She also is associate chair of the psychology department and senior fellow of MSU’s Office on Outreach and Engagement. In addition to her MSU appointments, Dr. Sullivan is the director of research and evaluation for the Michigan Coalition Against

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202 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN Domestic and Sexual Violence and senior research advisor to the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence. Dr. Sullivan’s areas of research expertise include conducting longitudinal, experimental evaluations of com- munity interventions for abused women and their children; improving the community response to violence against women; and evaluating victim service programs. In addition to consulting for local, state, federal, and international organizations and initiatives, Dr. Sullivan also conducts work- shops on effectively advocating in the community for women with abusive partners, and their children; understanding the effects of domestic abuse on women and children over time; improving system responses to the problem of violence against women; and evaluating victim service agencies. Cheryl Thomas, J.D., is director of the Women’s Human Rights Program, a program she founded at the Advocates for Human Rights (formerly Min- nesota Advocates for Human Rights) in 1993. Since 1994 Ms. Thomas has traveled throughout Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and Morocco to work with local partners to promote women’s human rights. She has provided consultation and training to government officials, legal professionals, and civil society groups in Armenia, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Morocco, and Tajikistan on best practices in legal reform on violence against women. In 2008 she was selected to be 1 of 15 experts from around the world to participate in a United Nations expert group meeting and publish a report on good practices in legislation on violence against women. In 2009 she participated in a second UN Expert Group Meeting in Ethiopia focused on harmful practices against women, with a report published in 2010 (Good Practices in Legislation on “Harm- ful Practices” Against Women). She has published numerous articles and reports on violence against women as a human rights abuse, most recently a report titled Sex Trafficking Needs Assessment for the State of Minnesota. Previously, she was adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, where she taught women’s international human rights, and execu- tive director of WATCH, a court monitoring organization focused on cases of violence against women and children. Ms. Thomas was honored as a 2005 Changemaker by Minnesota Women’s Press. Agnes Tiwari, Ph.D., R.N., is an associate professor and assistant dean of the School of Nursing at Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong. More than a decade ago, Dr. Tiwari set up the first nurse- led health clinic providing health screening and interventions in a shelter for abused women in Hong Kong. To date, not only has the service been extended to more than half of the shelters, but also the health data gathered have provided much-needed information about the needs of Chinese women survivors of intimate partner violence in general and the mental health impact of psychological abuse on Chinese women in particular. Her decade-long

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203 APPENDIX B efforts to advocate for abused women, supported by her research program, have influenced the Hong Kong government to set up a territory-wide initia- tive providing crisis support services to families across Hong Kong, and she has been appointed as an advisor to the initiative. Dr. Tiwari has developed several models of intervention for abused women and evaluated their efficacy to promote resilience and prevent violence using randomized controlled tri- als. She also has designed and implemented different approaches of service delivery for primary prevention of violence against women and children in prenatal and community settings. Empowerment is a key feature of the models and approaches, which can be adapted to different settings, including those with resource constraints. The results of a recent randomized control trial that Dr. Tiwari led, focusing on advocacy intervention to improve the mental health of community-dwelling abused women, were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (2010). Monique Widyono, M.P.A., M.S.W., is a program officer for gender, vio- lence, and rights at the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH). At PATH, she has focused on gender-based violence and develop- ing a framework for understanding femicide. Previously Ms. Widyono was co-executive director of Equality Now, a New York-based women’s rights organization, and has been on the staff of the U.N. Division for the Ad- vancement of Women. - Denise Wilson, Ph.D., R.N., is associate professor at Maori Health AUT University and editor-in-chief of Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. Addi- tionally, she is a member of the Ministry of Health Family Violence Advi- sory Committee, Korowai Atawhai Advisory Group, Wharangi Ruamano - (Maori Nurse Educators), and the Nursing Network for Violence Against Women International. She is fellow of the College of Nurses Aotearoa (New Zealand) and Te Mata o te Tau (Academy of Maori Research & Scholar- ship). Dr. Wilson has served as a member of the 1998 Ministerial Taskforce on Nursing, the Nursing Council of New Zealand’s Education Advisor, and a board member of Te Rau Puawai. Prior to commencing employment at AUT, Dr. Wilson was senior lecturer in Nursing (Maori Health) at Massey University. Before her academic career, Dr. Wilson was a registered nurse in various acute-care and community settings. She has an extensive back- ground in undergraduate and postgraduate nursing education, teaching in - the areas of Maori/indigenous health, nursing practice, research design and methods, cultural safety, and family violence. Dr. Wilson is of Ngati Tah- inga Tainui Awhiro and Ngati Porou ki Harataunga descent. David A. Wolfe, Ph.D., is a psychologist and author specializing in issues af- fecting children and youth. He holds the inaugural RBC Chair in Children’s Mental Health at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH),

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204 PREVENTING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN AND CHILDREN where he is head of the Centre for Prevention Science located in London. He also is professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Toronto and editor-in-chief of Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal. His recent book is entitled Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Why Teens Experi- ment and Strategies to Keep Them Safe (Yale University Press, 2006, with Peter Jaffe & Claire Crooks). Dr. Wolfe has broad research and clinical interests in abnormal child and adolescent psychology with a special focus on child abuse, domestic violence, and developmental psychopathology. He has authored numerous articles on these topics, especially in relationship to the impact of early childhood trauma on later development in child- hood, adolescence, and early adulthood. Dr. Wolfe has been pioneering new approaches to preventing many societal youth problems such as bul- lying, relationship violence, and substance abuse. He recently received the Donald O. Hebb Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology as a Science from the Canadian Psychological Association, and the Blanche L. Ittleson Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Delivery of Children’s Services and the Promotion of Children’s Mental Health from the American Orthopsychiatric Association. Gail Elizabeth Wyatt, Ph.D., a licensed clinical psychologist and a board- certified sex therapist, is professor of psychiatry and biomedical sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). For the first 17 years of her career, Dr. Wyatt was the first ethnic minority to receive training as a sexologist. She received a prestigious K award from the National Institute of Mental Health to develop the expertise to develop culturally congruent measures, conceptual frameworks, and interventions to capture sexual decision mak- ing among ethnic minority men and women within a socio-cultural frame- work. She was the first African-American woman in California to receive a license to practice psychology and the first African-American woman Ph.D. in a school of medicine to reach full professor. Dr. Wyatt directs the Sexual Health Program, the National Institutes of Health–funded Phodiso Training Project in South Africa, and the HIV/AIDS Translational Training Program and is associate director of the UCLA CFAR/AIDS Institute. She has been internationally recognized for her work in Jamaica, Africa, India, and, most recently, South Africa where she conducts a longitudinal study of the after- math of rape among South African women. She has published numerous books and journal articles, including the best-selling book Stolen Women: Reclaiming our Sexuality Taking Back Our Lives (John Wiley and Sons, 1997). Dr. Wyatt was instrumental in the Call for a State of Emergency by numerous state, community, and religious organizations to address the AIDS epidemic in black communities and subsequent health and mental health disparities that continue to fuel the virus.