Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Committee to Review EPA’S Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde

Jonathan M. Samet (Chair) is a pulmonary physician and epidemiologist. He is professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) and director of the USC Institute for Global Health. Dr. Samet’s research has focused on the health risks associated with inhaled pollutants. He has served on numerous committees concerned with public health: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board; committees of the National Research Council (NRC), including chairing Committee on Health Risks of Exposure to Radon (BEIR VI), the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter, and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; and committees of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He is a member of the IOM and is chair of the NRC Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials and a member of the National Academies Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Dr. Samet received his MD from the University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry.


Andrew F. Olshan (Vice-Chair) is professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. His research interests are the etiology of birth defects and cancer in children and adults. Recent work has focused on the role of environmental exposures, genetic factors, and adverse health effects in children and adults; risk factors for childhood tumors and neuroblastoma; and the effects of drinking-water disinfection byproducts on male reproductive health. He has served on several National Academies committees, most recently the National Research



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Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee to Review EPA’S Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde Jonathan M. Samet (Chair) is a pulmonary physician and epidemiologist. He is professor and Flora L. Thornton Chair of the Department of Preventive Medi- cine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) and director of the USC Institute for Global Health. Dr. Samet’s research has focused on the health risks associated with inhaled pollutants. He has served on numerous committees concerned with public health: the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board; committees of the National Re- search Council (NRC), including chairing Committee on Health Risks of Expo- sure to Radon (BEIR VI), the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter, and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; and committees of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He is a member of the IOM and is chair of the NRC Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Envi- ronmental, Health, and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials and a member of the National Academies Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Dr. Samet received his MD from the University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry. Andrew F. Olshan (Vice-Chair) is professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. His research interests are the etiology of birth defects and cancer in children and adults. Recent work has focused on the role of environmental exposures, genetic factors, and adverse health effects in children and adults; risk factors for childhood tumors and neuroblastoma; and the effects of drinking- water disinfection byproducts on male reproductive health. He has served on several National Academies committees, most recently the National Research 168

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Appendix A 169 Council Committee on Contaminated Drinking Water at Camp Lejeune and the Committee to Review the Evidence Regarding the Link between Exposure to Agent Orange and Diabetes. Dr. Olshan received his PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington. A. John Bailer is distinguished professor and chair in the Department of Statis- tics of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He is also a research fellow in the university’s Scripps Gerontology Center and an affiliate member of the Depart- ment of Zoology, the Department of Sociology and Gerontology, and the Insti- tute of Environmental Sciences at Miami University. His research interests in- clude the design and analysis of environmental and occupational health studies and quantitative risk estimation. He has served on several National Research Council Committees, including the Committee on Improving Risk Analysis Ap- proaches Used by the U.S. EPA, the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guide- lines, the Committee to Review the OMB Risk Assessment Bulletin, and the Committee on Toxicologic Assessment of Low-Level Exposures to Chemical Warfare Agents. He also has served as a member of the Report on Carcinogens Subcommittee and the Technical Reports Review Subcommittee of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Toxicology Program. Dr. Bailer received his PhD in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sandra J.S. Baird is an environmental analyst with the Massachusetts Depart- ment of Environmental Protection Office of Research and Standards. She sup- ports the air toxics and drinking-water programs through the development of cancer and noncancer toxicity values, evaluation of the implications of new toxicologic information and guidance, evaluation of site-specific toxicity and exposure assessment issues, and development of guidance in support of risk- based decision-making. Her research interests include probabilistic characteriza- tion of uncertainty in toxicity values for use in risk assessment and mixtures risk assessment. Dr. Baird received her PhD in toxicology from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Harvey Checkoway is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and the Department of Epidemiology at the Uni- versity of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. His expertise is in occupational and environmental determinants of chronic diseases. Research projects for which Dr. Checkoway has been the principal investigator include epidemiologic studies of cancer mortality in nuclear workers, of cancer mortality in phosphate-industry workers, of silicosis and lung cancer in silica- exposed diatomaceous-earth industry workers, of lung cancer in chromate- exposed aerospace workers, of reproductive hazards in lead-smelter workers, of cancer risks and parkinsonism in textile workers, and of environmental and ge- netic risk factors for Parkinson disease. Dr. Checkoway received his MPH from Yale University and his PhD in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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170 Review of EPA’s Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde Richard A. Corley is laboratory fellow in the biologic monitoring and biologic modeling group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operated by Bat- telle for the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Corley specializes in the develop- ment of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, real-time breath analy- sis, dermal and inhalation bioavailability, and the development of three- dimensional computational fluid-dynamic models of the respiratory system. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers on oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicology; on modes of action of a variety of industrial and consumer chemi- cals; and on pharmacokinetic modeling and its applications in human health risk assessment. Dr. Corley served on the National Research Council Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion and Standing Commit- tee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews. He received a PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. David C. Dorman is associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Veterinary Medicine of North Carolina State University. The primary objective of his research is to provide a refined understanding of chemically induced neurotoxicity in laboratory animals that will lead to improved assess- ment of potential neurotoxicity in humans. Dr. Dorman’s research interests in- clude neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Animal Models for Testing Interventions Against Aerosolized Bioterrorism Agents and as member and chair of two Committees on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants. He received his DVM from Colo- rado State University. He completed a combined PhD and residency program in toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicology. Charles H. Hobbs is a senior scientist emeritus at Lovelace Respiratory Re- search Institute (LRRI) and member of the board of directors of Lovelace Bio- medical and Environmental Research Institute. He was formerly director of toxicology at LRRI. His research interests centered on the long-term biologic effects of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they occur. His re- search has ranged from physical and chemical characterization of airborne toxi- cants to in vitro mechanistic and toxicologic studies in laboratory animals. Dr. Hobbs is an associate of the National Academies and has served on several committees of the National Research Council, including service as chair of the Committee on Animal Models for Testing Interventions Against Aerosolized Bioterrorism Agents, the Committee on Submarine Escape Action Levels, and the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures, and he is currently a member of the Committee on Biodefense at the U.S. Department of Defense. Dr. Hobbs earned a DVM from Colorado State University.

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Appendix A 171 Michael D. Laiosa is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin– Milwaukee. He had been a research assistant professor of environmental medi- cine at the University of Rochester. Dr. Laiosa’s research interests are focused on how environmental factors influence immunologically based human diseases, such as leukemia and autoimmunity. His specific interests involve identifying developmental and early-life environmental factors that influence cancer risks and autoimmune pathogenesis; identifying prenatal and early postnatal chemo- preventive agents that may reduce risk of such diseases as leukemia, atopy, and autoimmune disease; and determining the effect of early-life exposures to chemical mixtures on long-term immunologic health. Dr. Laiosa earned a PhD in microbiology and immunology from the State University of New York Up- state Medical University. Ivan Rusyn is professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences and En- gineering in the School of Public Health of the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. He directs the Laboratory of Environmental Genomics and the Carolina Center for Computational Toxicology in the Gillings School of Global Public Health of UNC. He also serves as associate director of the Cur- riculum in Toxicology and is a member of the Lineberger Comprehensive Can- cer Center, the Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility, the Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences. Dr. Rusyn’s laboratory focuses on the mechanisms of action of environmental toxi- cants and the genetic determinants of susceptibility to toxicant-induced injury. He is a member of the National Research Council Committee on Use of Emerg- ing Science for Environmental Health Decisions and was previously a member of the Committee on Tetrachlorethylene. Dr. Rusyn received his MD from Ukrainian State Medical University in Kiev and his PhD in toxicology from UNC at Chapel Hill. Mary Alice Smith is an associate professor and graduate coordinator of envi- ronmental health science at the University of Georgia. Her research interests are developmental toxicology and risk assessment. Her research focuses on the ef- fects of toxicants on reproduction and development, environmental and micro- bial risk-assessment methodology, and the effects of pathogens on pregnancy and development. She teaches courses in toxicology, developmental and repro- ductive toxicology, and risk assessment. Dr. Smith is member of the Teratology Society, the Society of Toxicology, and the International Association for Food Protection, and she is co-director of the Academy of the Environment at the University of Georgia. She has served on grant-review panels for the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Reg- istry. She has also served as a member of expert panels for the International Life Sciences—North America and the Food and Drug Administration, and she is a

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172 Review of EPA’s Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde member of the editorial board of Reproductive Toxicology. Dr. Smith earned a PhD in toxicology and pharmacology from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Leslie T. Stayner is a professor of epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research interests are occupational and environmental epidemiol- ogy, epidemiologic methods, risk assessment, and cancer and other chronic dis- eases. Dr. Stayner is a member of the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Public Health Association, and the International Commission on Oc- cupational Health, and he is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and the Institute of Medicine of Chicago. He has served on the editorial boards of several journals, including service as contributing editor of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine and editorial consultant for the American Journal of Epidemiology. He has also served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Making Best Use of the Agent Orange Exposure Reconstruction Model and the National Research Council Committee on Human Health Risks of Trichloro- ethylene. Dr. Stayner earned a PhD in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Helen H. Suh is the program area director for environmental health at the Na- tional Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. Until recently, Dr. Suh was on the faculty of Harvard University in the department of environ- mental health. Her research examines critical questions about the public-health consequences of air pollution through interdisciplinary, biologically relevant exposure-assessment research. Specifically, her research combines traditional measurement methods with novel exposure risk-assessment methods. Her work has been published in several journals. Dr. Suh has served on the National Re- search Council Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure and is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. She received her Sc.D. from Harvard University. Yiliang Zhu is professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the University of South Florida College of Public Health. He is also director of the college’s Center for Collaborative Research. His current research is fo- cused on quantitative methods in health risk assessment, including physiologi- cally based pharmacokinetic models, dose-response modeling, benchmark dose methods, and uncertainty quantification. He also conducts research in disease surveillance, health-outcome evaluation, and health-care access and use in de- veloping countries. Dr. Zhu has served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on EPA’s Exposure and Human Health Reassessment of TCDD and Related Compounds and the Committee on Tetrachloroethylene. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto.

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Appendix A 173 Patrick A. Zweidler-Mckay is an assistant professor at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and a member of the faculty of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. His research is directed at un- derstanding the critical genetic events that lead to the development of leukemia and to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches through molecular strate- gies. Clinically, Dr. Zweidler-McKay specializes in treating children who have particularly difficult or relapsed forms of leukemia and lymphoma. He is certi- fied by the American Board of Pediatrics and is a member of the American So- ciety of Hematology, the American Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncol- ogy, the Harris County Medical Society, and the Texas Medical Society. Dr. Zweidler-McKay earned a PhD in molecular biology and genetics and an MD from Temple University.