A
Statement of Task

The committee will:

  • Examine whether current and planned U.S. R&D efforts in materials for aerospace propulsion are sufficient (a) to meet U.S. military needs and (b) to keep the U.S. on the leading edge of propulsion technology.

  • Consider mechanisms for the timely insertion of materials in propulsion systems and, if necessary, how these mechanisms might be improved.

  • Consider mechanisms in place that retain intellectual property (IP) securely and how IP might be secured in future R&D programs.

  • Describe the general elements of an R&D strategy to develop materials for future military aerospace propulsion systems.

The committee will consider both air breathing and self contained fuel/oxidizer systems including scramjet capabilities and take account of: (a) fuel-efficiency and materials-technology challenges at both subsonic and supersonic (up to Mach 5); (b) findings and recommendations in the recent NRC report entitled A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs issued in 2006; (c) the impact of current non-U.S. investments in propulsion materials technologies; (d) the lead time for insertion of new materials into aerospace propulsion technologies and what would it take to shorten the timeline, if it is too long; and (e) the evolution of U.S. R&D on materials for aerospace propulsion with due consideration of:



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OCR for page 147
A Statement of Task The committee will: • Examine whether current and planned U.S. R&D efforts in materials for aerospace propulsion are sufficient (a) to meet U.S. military needs and (b) to keep the U.S. on the leading edge of propulsion technology. • Consider mechanisms for the timely insertion of materials in propulsion systems and, if necessary, how these mechanisms might be improved. • Consider mechanisms in place that retain intellectual property (IP) securely and how IP might be secured in future R&D programs. • Describe the general elements of an R&D strategy to develop materials for future military aerospace propulsion systems. The committee will consider both air breathing and self contained fuel/oxidizer systems including scramjet capabilities and take account of: (a) fuel-efficiency and materials-technology challenges at both subsonic and supersonic (up to Mach 5); (b) findings and recommendations in the recent NRC report entitled A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs issued in 2006; (c) the impact of current non-U.S. investments in propulsion mate- rials technologies; (d) the lead time for insertion of new materials into aerospace propulsion technologies and what would it take to shorten the timeline, if it is too long; and (e) the evolution of U.S. R&D on materials for aerospace propulsion with due consideration of: 147

OCR for page 147
m at e r i a l s n e e d s r & d s t r at e g y m i l i ta ry a e ro s Pac e P ro P u l s i o n 148 and for — Historic funding levels; — Government agencies involved; — Government investments (for both defense and civil applications) and industrial investments in propulsion R&D; and — Outside drivers such as non-defense and non-NASA investments and needs.