C

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF

Helen R. Quinn (Chair) is professor emerita of physics at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. A theoretical physicist, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and was president of the American Physical Society in 2004. In addition to her scholarship in physics, she has had long-term involvement in science education and in the continuing education of science teachers. She was an active contributor to the California State Science Standards development process. She is a former president and founder of the nonprofit Contemporary Physics Education Project. She served as chair of the Review and Evaluation of the Pre-College Education Program Committee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. At the National Research Council, she was a member of the Committee on Science Learning, K-8; the Federal Coordinating Committee on Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education; and the Center for Education Advisory Board. She has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University (1967).

Wyatt W. Anderson is the alumni foundation distinguished professor in the Genetics Department at the University of Georgia. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests include evolutionary genetics of mating behavior and chromosomal polymorphisms of the Drosophila species, evolutionary genomics of Drosophila, and science education and minority participation in college science curricula. At the National Research Council, he has served on a number of committees, including the Committee to Review Northeast Fishery Stock Assessments and the Committee on the Release of Genetically Engineered Organisms into the Environment. He has a B.S. in molecular evolution and



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 355
C BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF Helen R. Quinn (Chair) is professor emerita of physics at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. A theoretical physicist, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and was president of the American Physical Society in 2004. In addition to her scholarship in physics, she has had long-term involve- ment in science education and in the continuing education of science teachers. She was an active contributor to the California State Science Standards development process. She is a former president and founder of the nonprofit Contemporary Physics Education Project. She served as chair of the Review and Evaluation of the Pre-College Education Program Committee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. At the National Research Council, she was a member of the Committee on Science Learning, K-8; the Federal Coordinating Committee on Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education; and the Center for Education Advisory Board. She has a Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University (1967). Wyatt W. Anderson is the alumni foundation distinguished professor in the Genetics Department at the University of Georgia. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests include evolutionary genetics of mat- ing behavior and chromosomal polymorphisms of the Drosophila species, evolu- tionary genomics of Drosophila, and science education and minority participation in college science curricula. At the National Research Council, he has served on a number of committees, including the Committee to Review Northeast Fishery Stock Assessments and the Committee on the Release of Genetically Engineered Organisms into the Environment. He has a B.S. in molecular evolution and 355

OCR for page 355
an M.S. in population genetics and population biology from the University of Georgia and a Ph.D. in science literacy and education from Rockefeller University. Tanya Atwater is professor of tectonics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1997. Her research has concerned various aspects of tectonics, ranging from the fine details of sea floor spreading processes to global aspects of plate tectonics. She has par- ticipated in or led numerous oceanographic expeditions in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, including 12 dives to the deep sea floor in the tiny submersible, Alvin. She is especially well known for her works on the plate tectonic history of west- ern North America, in general, and of the San Andreas fault system, in particu- lar. She is devoted to science communication, teaching students at all levels in the university, presenting numerous workshops and field trips for K-12 teachers, and consulting for the written media, museums, television, and video producers. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the Geological Society of America and was a co-winner of the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received her education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the University of California, Berkeley; and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, completing a Ph.D. in 1972. Philip Bell is associate professor of the learning sciences and the Geda and Phil Condit professor of science and mathematics education at the University of Washington. He pursues a cognitive and cultural program of research across diverse environments focused on how people learn in ways that are personally consequential to them. He directs the ethnographic and design-based research of the Everyday Science and Technology Group as well as the University of Washington Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, which cultivates innovative projects in P-20 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics between university groups and community partners. He has stud- ied everyday expertise and cognition in science and health, the design and use of emerging learning technologies in science classrooms, children’s argumentation and conceptual change in science, culturally responsive science instruction, the use of emerging digital technologies in youth culture, and new approaches to inquiry instruction in science. He is a co-leader of the Learning in Informal and Formal Environments Science of Learning Center (http://life-slc.org/) and is a co-principal investigator of COSEE-Ocean Learning Communities (http://cosee-olc.org/). At the National Research Council, he is a member of the Board on Science Education A Framework for K-12 Science Education 356

OCR for page 355
and co-chaired the Committee on Learning Science in Informal Environments. He has a Ph.D. in education in human cognition and development from the University of California, Berkeley. Thomas B. Corcoran is co-director of the Consortium for Policy Research and Education (CPRE) at Teachers College of Columbia University. He has been a state policy maker, a designer of programs to improve teaching, a researcher, an evaluator, and an adviser to governors, state legislatures, foundations, and reform organizations. His research interests focus on the linkages between research and practice, the use of evidence-based instructional practices, the design of knowl- edge transfer systems for public education, the effectiveness of professional development, and the impact of changes in work environments on the productiv- ity of teachers and students. He heads the Center on Continuous Instructional Improvement and Teachers College projects in Jordan and Thailand. At the National Research Council, he served on the Committee on Science Learning, K-8. Since 1998 he has taught policy analysis at the Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs at Princeton University. He has an M.Ed. from the University of London. Rodolfo Dirzo is professor of biology at Stanford University. A tropical forest ecologist and conservation biologist, he has performed seminal work on evolution- ary ecology. He carried out classical experimental studies on the ecosystem signifi- cance of biodiversity loss, fragmentation, and deforestation. He is a foreign asso- ciate of the National Academy of Sciences as well as a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences and of the California Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded the Presidential Award in Ecology from the secretary of environment of Mexico. He was a Pew Scholar in Conservation and received its Outstanding Service Award: Teaching, Organization for Tropical Studies. He has M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wales. Phillip A. Griffiths is director emeritus and professor of mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study, which he led from 1991 to 2003. He was formerly provost and James B. Duke professor of mathematics at Duke University and professor of mathematics at Harvard University. Over the last four decades, he has made crucial contributions in several fields, including complex analysis, alge- braic geometry, and differential systems. He chaired the committee that produced the Carnegie Corporation report The Opportunity Equation. He served on the 357 Appendix C

OCR for page 355
National Science Board from 1991 to 1996. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a foreign associate of the Third World Academy of Sciences. At the National Research Council, he has served as a member, ex officio member, or chair of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board; the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education Advisory Board; and the U.S. National Committee for Mathematics; and he is currently a member of the Board on African Science Academy Development. He has an M.S. in mathematics from Wake Forest University and a Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University. Dudley R. Herschbach is emeritus professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University and professor of physics at Texas A&M University during the fall term. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He won the 1986 Nobel Prize in chemistry jointly with Yuan T. Lee and John C. Polanyi for their contributions concerning the dynamics of chemi- cal elementary processes. He has been a strong proponent of science education and science among the public and frequently gives lectures to students of all ages, sharing his enthusiasm for science and his playful spirit of discovery. He is engaged in several efforts to improve K-12 science education and public under- standing of science. He is a board member of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation and is the chairman of the board for Society for Science & the Public. At the National Research Council, he has served on the Committee on Education and Employment of Women in Science and Engineering; the Panel for National Science Education Standards and Television Project; the Board of Overseers; and the Communications Advisory Committee. He has a B.S. in math- ematics and an M.S. in chemistry from Stanford University. He has an A.M. in physics and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from Harvard University. Linda P.B. Katehi is chancellor of the University of California, Davis. Previously, she served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the John Edwardson dean of engineering and pro- fessor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University, and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. She led the effort to establish the Purdue School of Engineering Education, the first department at a U.S. university focused explicitly on engineer- ing education, particularly on K-12 engineering curricula, standards, and teacher A Framework for K-12 Science Education 358

OCR for page 355
education. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, chair of the nominations committees for the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and a member of the Kauffman National Panel for Entrepreneurship. She is currently a member of a number of National Academies committees, the Advisory Committee for Harvard Radcliffe College, and the Engineering Advisory Committees for Caltech, the University of Washington, and the University of California, Los Angeles. She has an M.S. and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles. Thomas E. Keller is a senior program officer with the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Science Education. In his current role, Keller is co-director of an NRC study committee that is developing a conceptual frame- work to guide new science education standards. In 2010, he was the vice presi- dent for education at the Biotechnology Institute in Arlington, Virginia. At the Institute, he was responsible for planning and implementing state leadership pro- grams and teacher professional development programs, including the National Biotechnology Teacher Leader Program. In 2007, while a program officer at the National Research Council, he directed the development of the award- winning Surrounded by Science: Learning Science in Informal Environments. From 1986 to 2007, he held several positions in K-12 education, including director of secondary instruction and state science supervisor for the Maine Department of Education. He served a term as president of the Council of State Science Supervisors and of the Maine Curriculum Leaders Association. He was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Science Education K-12 and the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment, which produced the National Science Education Standards. Keller has also served on the National Science Teachers Association board of directors. He has an Ed.D. in science edu- cation from the University of Massachusetts and has experience teaching high school science. John C. Mather is a senior astrophysicist at the U.S. space agency’s (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and is an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He won the Nobel Prize in physics jointly with George Smoot for their work on the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE). COBE was the first experiment to precisely measure the black body form and anisotropy of cosmic 359 Appendix C

OCR for page 355
microwave background radiation, helping cement the Big Bang theory of the uni- verse. He is also the senior project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Board on Physics and Astronomy and the Committee on Physics of the Universe. He has a B.A. in physics from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. Brett D. Moulding is director of the Utah Partnership for Effective Science Teaching and Learning, a five-district professional development collaborative. He was the director of curriculum and instruction at the Utah State Office of Education before retiring in 2008. He was the state science education specialist and coordinator of curriculum from 1993 to 2004. He taught chemistry for 20 years at Roy High School in the Weber school district and served as the district science teacher leader for 8 years. Moulding received the Governor’s Teacher Recognition Award, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, and the Award of Excellence in Government Service from the Governor’s Science and Technology Commission. He served on the Triangle Coalitional Board and the National Assessment of Educational Progress 2009 Framework Planning Committee and was the president of the Council of State Science Supervisors from 2003 to 2006. He has an administrative supervisory certificate from Utah State University; a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City; and an M.Ed. from Weber State University. Jonathan Osborne holds the Shriram family professorship in science education at Stanford University. Previously, he was a professor of science education at King’s College, University of London. His research focus is a mix of work on policy and pedagogy in the teaching and learning of science. In the policy domain, he is interested in exploring students’ attitudes toward science and how school science can be made more worthwhile and engaging, particularly for those who will not continue with the study of science. In pedagogy, his focus has been on making the case for the role of argumentation in science education, both as a means of improving the use of a more dialogic approach to teaching science and improv- ing student understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. He led the project on Enhancing the Quality of Argument in School Science Education, from which IDEAS (Ideas, Evidence and Argument in Science Education) materials to sup- port teacher professional learning were developed. He was one of the partners in A Framework for K-12 Science Education 360

OCR for page 355
the Centre for Informal Learning and Schools. He has a Ph.D. in education from King’s College, University of London. James W. Pellegrino is liberal arts and sciences distinguished professor and dis- tinguished professor of education at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). He is co-director of UIC’s interdisciplinary Learning Sciences Research Institute. His current work is focused on analyses of complex learning and instructional environments, including those incorporating powerful information technology tools, with the goal of better understanding the nature of student learning and the conditions that enhance deep understanding. A special concern of his research is the incorporation of effective formative assessment practices, assisted by technol- ogy, to maximize student learning and understanding. At the National Research Council, he has served on the Board on Testing and Assessment and co-chaired the Committee on the Cognitive Science Foundations for Assessment, which issued the report Knowing What Students Know: The Science and Design of Educational Assessment. He recently helped the College Board build new frameworks for curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development in Advanced Placement biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. He has a B.A. in psychology from Colgate University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Colorado. Stephen L. Pruitt is the chief of staff for the Office of the State Superintendent of Schools in the Georgia Department of Education. He is the current president of the Council of State Science Supervisors. Previously, he taught high school science for 12 years. He supervised the revision and implementation of Georgia’s new sci- ence curriculum. The Georgia Performance Standards have taken the state in a new direction in education with an emphasis on conceptual learning and inquiry. In the position of director of the Division of Academic Standards, he supervised the implementation of all content areas’ new curriculum. Currently, as the chief of staff for assessment and accountability, he supervises the development and opera- tion of all state testing and adequate yearly progress determinations. He has a B.S. in chemistry from North Georgia College and an M.Ed. from the State University of West Georgia. He is currently completing a Ph.D. in chemistry education from Auburn University. Brian Reiser is professor of learning sciences in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. His research examines how to make scientific 361 Appendix C

OCR for page 355
practices, such as argumentation, explanation, and modeling, meaningful and effective for classroom teachers and students. Reiser leads the MoDeLS project (Modeling Designs for Learning Science), to develop an empirically based learning progression for the practice of scientific modeling, and BGuILE (Biology Guided Inquiry Learning Environments), developing software tools for supporting stu- dents in analyzing biological data and constructing explanations. Reiser is also on the leadership team for IQWST (Investigating and Questioning our World through Science and Technology), a collaboration with the University of Michigan develop- ing a middle school project-based science curriculum. He was a founding member of the first graduate program in learning sciences, created at Northwestern, and chaired the program from 1993 to 2001. He was co-principal investigator in the Center for Curriculum Materials in Science, exploring the design and enactment of science curriculum materials. At the National Research Council, he served on the panel authoring the report Taking Science to School. He also served on the edito- rial boards of Science Education and the Journal of the Learning Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive science from Yale University (1983). Rebecca R. Richards-Kortum is the Stanley C. Moore professor of bioengineering at Rice University. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Her work has focused on translating research that integrates advances in nanotechnol- ogy and molecular imaging with microfabrication technologies to develop opti- cal imaging systems that are inexpensive and portable and provide point-of-care diagnosis. This basic and translational research is highly collaborative and has led to new technologies to improve the early detection of cancers and other diseases, especially in impoverished settings. Over the past few years, Richards-Kortum and collaborators have translated these technologies from North America to both low- and medium-resource developing countries (Botswana, Brazil, India, Mexico, and Taiwan). She served on the inaugural National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering for the National Institutes of Health (2002-2007) and was elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Biomedical Engineering Society (2008). At the National Research Council, she served on the Committee on Being a Scientist: Responsible Conduct in Research. She has a Ph.D. in medical physics and an M.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Heidi A. Schweingruber is the deputy director of the Board on Science Education at the National Research Council (NRC). She has worked in some capacity A Framework for K-12 Science Education 362

OCR for page 355
on most of the major projects of the board since it was formed in 2004. She served as study director for a review of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s pre-college education programs in 2007 and co-directed the study that produced the 2007 report Taking Science to School: Learning and Teaching Science in Grades K-8. She co-authored two award-winning books for practi- tioners that translate findings of NRC reports for a broader audience: Ready, Set, Science!: Putting Research to Work in K-8 Science Classrooms (2008) and Surrounded by Science (2010). Prior to joining the NRC, Schweingruber worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education where she administered the preschool curriculum evalu- ation program and a grant program in mathematics education. Previously, she was the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project. She holds a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition from the University of Michigan. Walter G. Secada is senior associate dean of the School of Education and chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning at the University of Miami (UM). Previously, he was professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the director of diversity in mathematics education. His research interests have included equity in education, mathematics education, bilingual education, school restructuring, professional development of teachers, student engagement, and reform. He was associate director and co-principal inves- tigator of Promoting Science among English Language Learners (P-SELL) with a High-Stakes Testing Environment, associate director and co-principal investigator of Science Made Sensible, and a member of the university’s social sciences insti- tutional review board. He has worked on the development of a secondary school mathematics and science academy at UM. As director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Hispanic Dropout Project, he was senior author of its final report, No More Excuses. He has a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Notre Dame and an M.S. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in education, both from Northwestern University. Deborah C. Smith is assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Pennsylvania State University. She teaches elementary science methods and graduate courses in science curriculum; the history, philosophy, and sociology of science; and science teacher knowledge. She is a former preschool and elementary school teacher, with a background in biology. Her research 363 Appendix C

OCR for page 355
focuses on how teachers and young children build communities of scientific discourses and practices in the early years of schooling. She was the author and co-principal investigator on a 5-year grant to the Lansing (Michigan) School District and Michigan State University, in which grade-level groups of K-8 teach- ers studied scientific content, standards-based and inquiry-oriented curriculum design, research-based teaching practices, and their students’ science learning. At the National Research Council, she served on the Teacher Advisory Council and was a consultant for the popular publication, Ready, Set, Science! She has a B.S. in biology from Boston University, an M.A.T. in science education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruc- tion from the University of Delaware. A Framework for K-12 Science Education 364