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Appendix C Committee Biographies Linda Rosenstock, M.D., M.P.H. (elected to the Institute of Medicine [IOM] in 1995), is dean of the School of Public Health, University of Cali- fornia at Los Angeles (UCLA). She is a recognized authority in occupational and environmental health as well as global public health and science policy. Prior to going to UCLA in 2000, Dr. Rosenstock served for seven years as the director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, where she led a staff of 1,500 at the only federal agency mandated to under- take research and prevention activities in occupational safety and health. In recognition of her efforts, Dr. Rosenstock received the Presidential Distin- guished Executive Rank Award, the highest executive service award in the federal government. In 2003 she cochaired the IOM committee addressing public health workforce needs that authored the report Who Will Keep the Public Healthy? Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Cen- tury. Dr. Rosenstock is immediate past chair of the Association of Schools of Public Health and immediate past president of the Society of Medical Administrators. Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H., is professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle. Dr. Berg received his professional education in family medicine and in general preventive medicine and public health at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; the University of Missouri; and the University of Wash- ington and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Berg’s research has focused on clinical epidemiology in primary care settings. He has been active on many expert panels using evidence-based methods to develop 223

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224 CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES FOR WOMEN clinical guidelines, including chair of the United States Preventive Services Task Force, cochair of the otitis media panel convened by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), chair and moderator of the STD Treatment Guidelines panel of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), member of the American Medical Association-CDC panel producing Guidelines for Ado- lescent Preventive Services, and chair of the CDC’s Evaluation of Genetic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group. He has served on the Institute of Medicine’s Immunization Safety Review Committee (mem- ber), the Committee on the Treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (chair), and the Committee on Standards for Systematic Reviews of Clinical Effectiveness Research (chair). Claire D. Brindis, Dr.P.H., M.P.H., is professor of pediatrics and health policy in the Department of Pediatrics and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Health Sciences at the University of Cali- fornia, San Francisco. Dr. Brindis is director of the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, executive director of National Adolescent Health Information and Innovation Center, and director of the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health. Dr. Brindis’s research interests are in the area of developing and evaluating innovative, community-based, comprehensive, integrated services for children, youth, and women and in combining quali- tative and quantitative approaches to program evaluation. Her research focuses on child and adolescent health policy and women’s health, with a special focus on Latina health. Dr. Brindis’s educational background in- cludes a doctoral degree in public health and behavioral sciences from the University of California at Berkeley and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California at Los Angeles. Angela Diaz, M.D., M.P.H., is the Jean C. and James W. Crystal Professor of Pediatrics and Community Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. After earning her medical degree in 1981 at the Columbia University Col- lege of Physicians and Surgeons, she completed her postdoctoral training at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1985 and subsequently received a master’s in public health from Harvard University. Dr. Diaz is the director of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center, a unique program that pro- vides comprehensive, integrated, interdisciplinary primary care, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, and health education services to teens. She has been a White House Fellow, a member of the Food and Drug Ad- ministration Pediatric Advisory Committee, and a member of the National Institutes of Health State of the Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health Risk Social Behaviors in Adolescents. She serves on an advisory panel for the National Institutes of Health Reproductive Sciences

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225 APPENDIX C Branch. She is a frequent speaker at conferences throughout the country and around the world. Francisco Garcia, M.D., M.P.H., is the director of the University of Arizona Center of Excellence in Women’s Health. Dr. Garcia is the Distinguished Professor of Public Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pharmacy and Mexican-American Studies at the University of Arizona and Chair of Fam- ily and Child Health of the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. He also serves as the codirector of the Cancer Disparities Institute of the Arizona Cancer Center. He is the past director of the Arizona His- panic Center of Excellence (until 2007), as well as former director of the Division of Gynecology (until 2006). Dr. Garcia has served as a consultant to and collaborator on a variety of domestic and international agencies and nongovernmental organizations concerned with cervical cancer prevention, including the Department of Health of the State of Sonora, Population Council, the Pan-American Health Organization, the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas (Peruvian National Cancer Institute), IMSS- Solidaridad, Programa de Salud Reproductiva (the Mexican Social Security Institute-Reproductive Health Program), JHPIEGO, and PATH. Kimberly Gregory, M.D., M.P.H., is vice chair of Women’s Healthcare Quality and Performance Improvement, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. She also serves as professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and the UCLA School of Public Health. Dr. Gregory is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and maternal-fetal medicine. Her research interests include obstetrical health care utilization, rates of delivery by cesarean section, and the management of complications of la- bor and delivery as it relates to patient safety and health care quality. Dr. Gregory served on the U.S. Public Health Service’s Prevention Task Force (2006 to 2010). Dr. Gregory received her bachelor’s degree from UCLA and her medical degree from the Charles Drew University School of Medicine and Science. She completed her internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and her fellowship in mater- nal-fetal medicine at Los Angeles County, University of Southern California Medical Center. Dr. Gregory received her master’s of public health from the Harvard University School of Public Health in 1991. Paula A. Johnson, M.D., M.P.H., an internationally recognized cardiologist, is the executive director of the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology and chief of the Division of Women’s Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Johnson brings a broad range of experience as a phy-

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226 CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES FOR WOMEN sician, researcher, and expert in public health and health policy to bear in the effort to transform the health of women. Central to the Connors Cen- ter’s mission is discovering how disease is expressed differently in women and men, integrating leading-edge research about women’s health into the delivery of care, influencing health policy, addressing the health of women globally, and training the next generation of leadership in the field. Dr. Johnson is a graduate of Harvard and Radcliffe Colleges, and received her M.D. and M.P.H. from Harvard. Dr. Johnson has been recognized with many awards for her contributions in women’s and minority health and public health and is featured as a national leader in medicine by the Na- tional Library of Medicine. Anthony Lo Sasso, Ph.D., is a professor and senior research scientist in the Division of Health Policy and Administration at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health and the Institute of Government and Pub- lic Affairs at the University of Illinois. He joined the University of Illinois at Chicago faculty in 2004. Dr. Lo Sasso is an economist whose research spans several dimensions of health economics and health services research. Dr. Lo Sasso is keenly interested in how government policies affect private- sector decisions. Dr. Lo Sasso has studied the impact of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program on uninsurance among children and the extent to which public coverage crowded out private coverage. In addition, he has examined how community rating provisions affected non-group health insurance coverage and uninsurance. Dr. Lo Sasso also studies the effects of health savings accounts and other high-deductible health insurance prod- ucts on service use and spending. He is currently working with the Upstate Health Research Network in New York to calculate usual and customary reimbursement rates for the health insurance industry. Dr. Lo Sasso received his doctorate in economics in 1996 from Indiana University, Bloomington. Jeanette H. Magnus, M.D., Ph.D., is Cecile Usdin Professor in Women’s Health; professor of public health and chair of the Department of Com- munity Health Sciences at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; and a clinical professor in the Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine. She is also the director of the Tulane Xavier National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health and the Mary Amelia Douglas-Whited Community Women’s Health Edu- cation Center. Dr. Magnus’s work bridges clinical medicine and science, epidemiology, public health, and community research. She has extensive experience in rheumatology and internal medicine. She developed and es- tablished the Tulane University Total Woman Health Care Clinic in 2000, providing primary and specialty care to women across the life span. Her research interests are in gender and race disparity in health and disease;

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227 APPENDIX C the association between health behaviors, self-evaluated health or mental health, and chronic disease; cardiovascular disease; and osteoporosis. Dr. Magnus has more than 130 publications and extensive experience in net- work building and coordination of projects that involve research scientists and practitioners with different backgrounds. She is the associate editor for the Epidemiology and Population Health Section for Gender Medicine and a member of the editorial boards of the Biology of Sex Differences and the Journal of Women’s Health. Dr. Magnus earned both her M.D. and Ph.D. from University of Tromsø in Norway. Heidi D. Nelson M.D., M.P.H., is a research professor of medical infor- matics and clinical epidemiology and medicine at the Oregon Health & Science University and medical director for cancer prevention and screening at Providence Health and Services, Portland, Oregon. Dr. Nelson received her M.D. and M.P.H. at the University of Minnesota and completed her internal medicine residency at the Oregon Health & Science University and fellowship in clinical epidemiology at the University of California, San Francisco. Since 1998, Dr. Nelson has conducted systematic evidence re- views and comparative effectiveness reviews for the United States Preventive Services Task Force, National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Healthcare Program, and Drug Effective- ness Review Project, among others, at the Oregon Evidence-Based Practice Center. Her work has been used in developing clinical recommendations, practice guidelines, and consensus statements primarily in areas of women’s health. At Providence, a not-for-profit, community-based, integrated health system in the western United States, she has developed patient data regis- tries for quality improvement and research purposes, including a breast cancer screening and treatment registry. She has also led planning, imple- mentation, and evaluation of health care programs and practices across the state to improve health care for women. Roberta B. Ness, M.D., M.P.H., is dean, M. David Low Chair in Public Health, and professor in epidemiology at The University of Texas School of Public Health. Dr. Ness was formerly chair of the Department of Epidemiol- ogy at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and served as interim dean in 2005 and 2006. Dr. Ness received her M.D. from Cornell University and her M.P.H. from Columbia University. Dr. Ness was one of the first to propose the research paradigm now termed “gender-based biology” in her book titled Health and Disease Among Women (1999). Dr. Ness is also known for her work on teaching innovation. She recently authored Innovation Generation, an instructional program for innovative thinking (to be published in 2012 by Oxford University Press). Dr. Ness is a fellow of the American College of Physicians; member of the Academy

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228 CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES FOR WOMEN of Medicine, Engineering, and Science of Texas; and member of the Insti- tute of Medicine of the National Academies. She is president-elect of the American Epidemiologic Society and past president of the American Col- lege of Epidemiology. She is an elected member of the prestigious American Society for Clinical Investigation, Delta Omega Honorary Society, and the American Epidemiologic Society. She was selected by the Society for Gen- eral Internal Medicine to be the 2008 Distinguished Professor of Women’s Health. In 2011 she was named a U.S. presidential appointee to the Mickey Leland Center for Environmental Air Toxicant Research. Magda G. Peck, Sc.D., professor of public health and pediatric at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), in Omaha, is a national leader in maternal and child health. Dr. Peck’s specific areas of expertise include prevention and public health for women and children, translating science into effective programs and policies, and leadership and workforce development. She received master’s and doctoral degrees (1983, 1986) from the Harvard University School of Public Health, specializing in maternal and child health and social policy. For more than two decades, Dr. Peck has worked to build public health capacity to make a measurable differ- ence for women and children. In 1988, Dr. Peck founded CityMatCH (www.citymatch.org), which has become the leading national public health organization dedicated to improving the health and well-being of women, children, and families in America’s urban communities. While serving as CityMatCH’s chief executive officer (until 2007), she lead the design and dissemination of innovative approaches to improving local understanding and action to address mother-to-baby transmission of human immunodefi- ciency virus and AIDS, reduce health disparities, and improve women and infant’s health, including the perinatal periods of risk approach. She served as a member of the Select Panel for Preconception Care with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to shape national recommendations on the care of women prior to pregnancy, and co-led the Public Health Work Group of the National Preconception Health Steering Committee. Dr. Peck has been a pioneer for academic public health in Nebraska. She was found- ing director of the state’s only master of public health program and helped establish the Great Plains Public Health Leadership Institute, which she has directed since 2005. As the new associate dean for community engagement and public health practice of the new UNMC College of Public Health, she ensures a dynamic, mutually beneficial interface between academe and community. E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., is currently vice president, Univer- sity of Maryland, and dean of the School of Medicine. Previously, he was vice chancellor and dean of the University of Arkansas College of Medi-

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229 APPENDIX C cine. Dr. Reece received his undergraduate degree (B.S., magna cum laude) from Long Island University, his M.D. degree from New York University, his Ph.D. degree in biochemistry from the University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica, and his M.B.A. degree from the Fox School of Busi- ness and Management of Temple University. He completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University Medical Center and a fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at Yale University School of Medicine. He served on the faculty at Yale for almost 10 years and was the Abraham Roth Professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at Temple University. Dr. Reece has published more than 500 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts, and 9 textbooks, with revisions. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Maternal-Fetal Medicine and a reviewer for several scientific journals. He directs a Na- tional Institutes of Health-funded laboratory studying the biomolecular mechanisms of diabetes-induced birth defects. Dr. Reece is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Alina Salganicoff, Ph.D., is vice president and director of Women’s Health Policy at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. She directs the foun- dation’s work on health coverage and access to care for women, with an emphasis on challenges facing underserved women. She also directs KaiserEDU.org, the foundation’s educational website. Dr. Salganicoff has written and spoken extensively on a broad range of health policy concerns facing women, ranging from health disparities to long-term care. She was also an associate director of the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, specializing on the access challenges facing low-income families, Medicaid managed care, and state health reform. Prior to joining Kaiser, she worked on the program staff of the Pew Charitable Trusts. She has served on numerous federal, state, and nonprofit advisory committees, including the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Women’s Health Research. Dr. Salganicoff received a B.S. from the Pennsylvania State University and holds a Ph.D. in health policy from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Sally W. Vernon, Ph.D., is director of the Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, Blair Justice Professor in Mind-Body Medicine and Pub- lic Health, and professor of epidemiology and behavioral sciences at the Uni- versity of Texas-Houston School of Public Health (UTSPH) and the Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research. Dr. Vernon’s training is in epidemiology and behavioral sciences. She received her B.A. in Spanish from the University of Oklahoma, her M.A. in sociology from New York Univer- sity, and her Ph.D. in community health sciences from UTSPH. Dr. Vernon conducts interdisciplinary research in cancer prevention and control, with

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230 CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES FOR WOMEN an emphasis on breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. Her work has been conducted in community, work-site, and medical care settings, where she has developed and tested interventions to promote cancer screening behaviors. Dr. Vernon has published more than 150 scientific articles and book chapters and is currently a member of several editorial boards including those of the Journal of National Cancer Institute, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Preventive Medicine, and Cancer Causes and Control. She is a fellow and past president of the American College of Epidemiology. Carol S. Weisman, Ph.D., is distinguished professor of public health sciences and obstetrics and gynecology at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, with a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Administration, and associate dean for faculty affairs. Dr. Weisman is a sociologist and health services researcher with a principal interest in women’s health care and policy. Her research focuses on improving access and qual- ity in women’s primary care and on how health care and health risks affect women’s health. She is director of the Central Pennsylvania Center of Excel- lence for Research on Pregnancy Outcomes and of the Central Pennsylvania Women’s Health Study (CePAWHS); Principal Investigator of the Penn State BIRCWH (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health) K-12 Program; and Associate Editor of Women’s Health Issues. She received her B.A. from Wellesley College with a major in sociology and anthropol- ogy and her Ph.D. in social relations (sociology) from the Johns Hopkins University.