• Involving university deans and others who can help ensure implementation can be critical. Overseas visits can be very helpful.
  • Encouragement and support for student visits abroad and exchanges could be helpful. Some universities are doing a lot, but overall only a small percentage of U.S. students have a study abroad experience.
  • Cultural issues in U.S. academia can be an important factor. It is important for U.S. academics to understand some ways in which they might be different from academics elsewhere. For example, American faculty can be fiercely independent, and they might take the view that their actions do not reflect on their institution. They may lack awareness of centers of excellence outside the United States. Students can drive internationalization and encourage reluctant faculty to modify the curriculum or to give credit for courses taken elsewhere.
  • Sample suggestions for successful collaborations: (1) Seek mutual interests at the outset, (2) Identify benefits for each participant, (3) Ensure that collective resources are sufficient to achieve objectives, (4) Ensure that agreements are made at the right level to commit necessary resources.
  • Potential partners outside the department: (1) The business school, which may have international programs, (2) Federal labs which have international activities, (3) States with international consortia (e.g., Washington, Oregon), (4) International universities, INSEAD being an example.

 

REFERENCES

IRGC (International Risk Governance Council). 2010. IRGC Summary Information. Geneva. Available at http://www.irgc.org/IMG/pdf/IRGC_SumInfo_13July.pdf (accessed January 2011).

IRGC (International Risk Governance Council). 2007. Nanotechnology Risk Governance: Recommendations for a global, coordinated approach to the governance of potential risks (Policy Brief). Geneva.



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