Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

WORKSHOP ON THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS
OF VIOLENCE: THE VALUE OF PREVENTION

April 28-29, 2011

APPROACH: This workshop will present an ecological life course framework for thinking about the impact of violence, to explore how the costs can be greater than typically conceived. Building from the individual to the community to the societal level, the workshop will examine the effect that violence has on development. Speakers will explore the ways in which a community can mitigate violence or the associated impacts.

OBJECTIVES:

  • To examine the social and economic costs of violence through a common framework that accounts for both life course and ecological impacts.
  • To explore the value of preventing violence through early interventions, multisectoral responses, and community-based approaches.


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Appendix A Workshop Agenda WORKSHOP ON THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE: THE VALUE OF PREVENTION April 28-29, 2011 ApproAch: This workshop will present an ecological life course framework for thinking about the impact of violence, to explore how the costs can be greater than typically conceived. Building from the individual to the community to the societal level, the workshop will examine the effect that violence has on development. Speakers will explore the ways in which a community can mitigate violence or the associated impacts. objectives: •  To examine the social and economic costs of violence through a common framework that accounts for both life course and ecologi- cal impacts. •  To explore the value of preventing violence through early interven- tions, multisectoral responses, and community-based approaches. 141

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142 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE Day 1—ThursDay, april 28 section i. Setting the Stage 8:15 Am-9:15 Am 8:15 Am—Opening Remarks Patrick kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H. Institute of Medicine 8:30 Am—Welcome Mark rosenberg, M.D., M.P.P. The Task Force for Global Health 8:45 Am—Keynote stePhen lewis AIDS-Free World section ii. A Framework for Understanding the Costs 9:15 Am-12:10 pm This session will introduce a qualitative framework that seeks to compre- hensively identify the impact of violence across the life span and through the ecological levels. What are the kinds of social and economic costs asso- ciated with different types of violence? How would an economist attempt to quantify these costs? What are the critical challenges involved in measuring and evaluating costs? Moderated by PaMela teaster, Ph.D. University of Kentucky 9:15 Am—Framework for Assessing the Costs of Violence Phaedra corso, Ph.d. University of Georgia Panel: Types of Violence •  9:40 aM—Interpersonal violence: Hugh Waters, M.D., Ph.D., RAND Health •  10:05aM—Suicide: Michael Phillips, M.D., M.P.H., Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine 10:05 Am—breAk

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143 APPENDIX A Panel: Risk Factors •  10:45 aM—Firearms: David Hemenway, Ph.D., Harvard University •  11:10 aM—Alcohol: Philip Cook, Ph.D., Duke University 11:35 Am—Discussion with All Panelists Lunch 12:10 pm-1:00 pm section iii. Beyond Injury: The Indirect Costs 1:00 pm-2:20 pm Like secondhand smoke, the impact of violence extends beyond the direct victims and beyond acute injuries. What are the consequences for individu- als, for families, and for communities? Using the framework, speakers will consider both immediate and longer-term effects. Moderated by Peggy Murray, Ph.D., M.S.W. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism 1:00 pm—Impact of Violence as Contagion rowell huesMann, Ph.D., M.S. University of Michigan 1:25 pm—Q&A with Dr. Huesmann 1:40 pm—Impact on Direct Victims in the Long Run deborah Prothrow-stith, M.D. Spencer Stuart 2:05 pm—Q&A with Dr. Prothrow-Stith 2:20 pm—breAk section iv. Shaping the Impact: The Context of Violence 2:40 pm-5:15 pm Different contexts result in different experiences of violence. How does the environment, including its risk and protective factors, shape the nature of violence and its costs? Presenters will examine the outcomes and costs related to violence in different contexts (in terms of both geography and the nature of the violence).

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144 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE 2:40 pm—Opening Remarks Mindy Fullilove, M.D. Columbia University 2:55 pm—Case Study Presentations: •  2:55 PM— Drug cartel-related violence in Juárez, Mexico: Arturo Cervantes, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H., Ministry of Health, Mexico •  3:15 PM—Collective violence in Sierra Leone: Theresa Betancourt, Sc.D., M.A., Harvard University •  3:35 PM—Youth violence in Kingston, Jamaica: Elizabeth Ward, M.B.B.S., M.Sc., University of the West Indies •  3:55 PM—Intimate partner violence in Bangladesh, Morocco, and Uganda: Aslihan Kes, M.S., International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) 4:15 pm—Discussionwith Panelists Led by Mindy Fullilove Columbia University 5:00 pm—Summary of Day 1 Mindy Fullilove and david heMenway Day 2—FriDay, april 20 section i. Violence and Development 8:30 Am-9:45 Am 8:15 Am—Welcome and Introduction of Day 2 Mark rosenberg The Task Force for Global Health 8:20 Am—Keynote: From the Individual to the Community How does exposure to violence in early childhood impact an individual’s development throughout his or her lifetime? How can intervening in early developmental stages prevent violence or minimize its impact? How do these impacts carry through to the community level? Jack shonkoFF, M.D. Center on the Developing Child Harvard University 8:50 Am—Q&A with Dr. Shonkoff

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145 APPENDIX A 9:10 Am—Implications in the Global Development Context How does violence affect the achievement of economic and human devel- opment goals? What role does development play in promoting individual and community resilience to violent events? Are there opportunities for synergies between the global development and violence prevention agendas? gary Milante, Ph.D. The World Bank 9:35 Am—Q&A with Dr. Milante 9:45 Am—breAk section ii. Who Pays?: The Costs of Violence Across Society 10:00 Am-11:30 Am The comprehensive framework for understanding costs demonstrates that the costs of violence do not fall upon a narrow portion of society, but on everyone. All sectors, therefore, have a part to play in preventing violence. Representatives from various sectors and government agencies will talk about what they perceive as both the overt and the hidden costs of violence. How can different sectors work together to produce a broad and integrated response that will more effectively combat violence? 10:00 Am—Opening Remarks XinQi dong, M.D., M.P.H. Administration on Aging Department of Health and Human Services 10:10 Am—Panel: Violence and Violence Prevention Across Sectors • e. christi cunningham, J.D., Department of Labor • Kevin Sabet, Ph.D., White House Office of National Drug Control Policy • Michael Wells, Ph.D., Safe and Drug Free Schools, Department of Education 11:00 Am—Open Discussion: Opportunities for Collaborative Prevention Lunch 11:30 Am-12:30 pm

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146 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC COSTS OF VIOLENCE section iii. The Case for Violence Prevention 12:30 pm-3:00 pm Although the costs of violence are enormous, they are not inevitable. Building on the framework from Day 1, the speakers will examine why investments in violence prevention make economic sense. What are the measurable benefits of investing in interventions that reduce risk factors or promote protective factors? How can the strengths of individuals, families, and communities be leveraged for violence prevention? 12:30 pm—The Value of Prevention rachel davis, M.s.w. Prevention Institute 1:00 pm—Panel: Promoting Resilience Through Community-Based Interventions 1:00 PM—Developing effective interventions: Juma Assiago, UN •  Habitat •  1:25 PM—Choosing an approach: The Communities That Care Model: J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., University of Washington 1:50 PM—Organizing diverse community stakeholders: Rodrigo •  Guerrero, M.D., Dr.P.H., Vallenpaz 2:15 PM—Reaching the community: Ivan Juzang, M.B.A., MEE •  Productions 2:40 pm—Discussion with Panelists Led by rachel davis Prevention Institute 3:00 pm—breAk section iv. The Road Ahead 3:15 pm-4:00 pm Moderated by Mark rosenberg, The Task Force for Global Health, and rodrigo guerrero, Vallenpaz A guided discussion with the audience will examine how we can use our new understanding of the costs to mobilize the necessary stakeholders and resources to push violence prevention forward. What are the knowl- edge gaps that we need to address to make a more effective case for these investments? How can violence prevention be incorporated into existing initiatives?